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SuymezFriday 12th of November 2004 11:08:10 AM
Which word is same in most languages - Suddenly an idea came to my mind that there were many words were same in some languages. e.g. computer, telephone...etc.

who else intersted in this topic, or who can tell me more words.
mugshotFriday 12th of November 2004 03:36:09 PM
hmmm well........ - Im not that advanced at languages (if any are wrong correct me ppl) so dont know to many words but I thought the word mum seems to be fairly similar in a few languages.....does anyone know the word mum in any other language to see how close they are

English - Mum
Bulgarian - Mama
French - Mere
German - Mutter
not sure which asian language but - Mumaje


sudsarFriday 12th of November 2004 06:45:44 PM
- ma - Hindi, Bengali, Urudu
amma - Tamil, Kannada, Telugu, Sinahala
amme - Malayalam
aayee - Marati

joziboyFriday 12th of November 2004 11:38:16 PM
- ma - Afrikaans
mama - isiZulu
mama - isiXhosa
... You have a point :)
PepperlandSaturday 13th of November 2004 04:09:21 AM
- Virus,same in all languages I guess

suymezSunday 14th of November 2004 09:48:29 AM
Vielen Dank für ihnen !!! - Thank you for everyone's post reply.

I'm very glad you are interested in this topic. But "chess" is " shahmat/ shaah- maat/ " in my language, however, to my surprise that's same as in German ( I mean the pronunciatuon) though Uyghur is an Asian language and German is European.

So can anybody tell me how to say " shahmat" in your language?

Thanks.
magyar chunsaMonday 22nd of November 2004 01:40:58 AM
- mother:

hungarian: anya/anyu/anyuci
korean: uh-muh-ni/ummuh
japanese: haha/okaasan

so those aren't similar to mom/mother
magyar chunsaMonday 22nd of November 2004 01:43:35 AM
- [quote]Originally posted by suymez

I'm very glad you are interested in this topic. But "chess" is " shahmat/ shaah- maat/ " in my language, however, to my surprise that's same as in German ( I mean the pronunciatuon) though Uyghur is an Asian language and German is European.

So can anybody tell me how to say " shahmat" in your language?

Thanks.[/quote]

in hungarian it's "sakk" (pronounced kinda like "shuhk").
kifli can correct me on this if i'm wrong :)
keaWednesday 22nd of December 2004 12:33:28 AM
- chess in Estonian is 'male'
But I think the word that is pretty much the same in most languages (at least the ones I have heard) is SEX ;-)
tinkerbWednesday 22nd of December 2004 01:18:15 AM
-

The word that is most alike in all languages, albeit not exactly the same, is tea. If I am not mistaken, the original words for tea come from the Chinese and are t'e in the Amoy dialect and ch'a in the Mandarin. All languages adopted this word using one of these two roots, as far as I know. It would be interesting to have people post here about the words for tea in the languages they know.
FizzWednesday 22nd of December 2004 03:18:56 AM
Tea - Tee (German)
Thee (Dutch)
Tee (Afrikaans)
Herbata (Polish)
teetä (finnish)
bennylinWednesday 22nd of December 2004 03:35:53 PM
-
IMHO, computer-related words sure to be same almost everywhere.

CPU, CD, CD-ROM, DVD, umm.. that's all abbreviation that i think used widely

internet, discuss, file, login, logout, bug, Megabyte, bit, classroom, cut-copy-paste, edit, hack, data, hard disk, software, hardware, install... and many more - are just some of words that is the same with what Indonesian people use...

other than common abbreviation, i think words are less possibly spoken the same due to different set of alphabets, like latin, or chinese, or japanese, or hindi... but usually those languages share the same common abbreviated words.

SuymezSunday 30th of January 2005 06:22:43 PM
tea and KEBAB - Thank you everyone's feedback for this issue.
This might be very interesting topic.

one of my chinese teacher has told me that the word for tea was orginally borrowed from chinese. TEA /ti:/ which is vastly used in wetern European Languages comes from the southern Chinese dialects and the other one CHA / cha:/ which is vastely used among the other Asian languages comes from the northern Chinese or the Chinses mandarin.

I found that the word ' kebab' which is originally a Turkic word might be same among all the languages in the world.
JadokesaMonday 31st of January 2005 01:28:15 AM
- I read in a scientific magazine that the words "papa" and "mama" (with small differences in spelling) existed in 800 of the 1000 languages they checked.

Swedish:
chess - schack
tea - te
mum - mamma
kebab - kebab
keaTuesday 01st of February 2005 02:43:09 PM
in Estonian again - tea=tee
mother='ema' or 'emme' for kids
haiquMonday 28th of February 2005 01:21:47 PM
- [quote]Originally posted by suymez


Thank you for everyone's post reply.

I'm very glad you are interested in this topic. But "chess" is " shahmat/ shaah- maat/ " in my language, however, to my surprise that's same as in German ( I mean the pronunciatuon) though Uyghur is an Asian language and German is European.

So can anybody tell me how to say " shahmat" in your language?

Thanks.[/quote]

In English, it translates as CHECKMATE which is used to signify the end of the game. Shahmat literally means "the king is dead", afaik.

Rob

EmDee1B86Thursday 10th of March 2005 11:51:52 AM
- For mother:

Tagalog=ina
Ilocano (Filipino dialect)=inang

For tea:
Tagalog=tiahe
PsycheTuesday 15th of March 2005 11:40:15 PM
Norwegian - chess - sjakk
tea - te
mum - mamma /mor / mutter
kebab - kebab

Interesting topic! I think the word "no" is similar in some languages..

English: No
Norwegian: Nei
German: Nein
Russian: Njet
French: Non




UlvenWednesday 16th of March 2005 01:05:43 AM
- Something I find amusing about 'no' being similar in so many languages, is that in the middle of all of the European 'n'-based no's, is Greek 'ne'. Which means... ""yes"" :s. lol.
Peter fra LAWednesday 16th of March 2005 04:26:38 AM
- As mentioned earlier the best words that will be used almost across all languages will be technical words, scientific and medical words.