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CrimsonWolfMonday 24th of May 2004 09:02:06 AM
kan je mij helpen - I'm studying Dutch and my brother studies German. However neither of us are fluent but there are some obvious similarities. I'm curious to know if any of you out there know of or have seen any comparisons between the two. I'll put down some Dutch phrases and someone who knows German can transcribe them. I'd like to see the written differences in common simple phrases.

Dutch English German
Wat is jouw naam? - what is your name? -
Hallo. hoe gaat het?- hi how's it goin? -
Ik spreek Nederlands en Engls.- i speak dutch and english -
mag ik je iets vragen?- may i ask you something? -

if someone could transcribe these to german i would appreciate it.
anschub86Monday 24th of May 2004 09:57:09 AM
- Wie ist dein Name?
Hallo.Wie geht's?
Ich spreche Niederländisch und Englisch.
Kann ich dich was fragen?

I think if Dutch people speak slowly and clearly we Germans can understand them without learning Dutch and the other way around. Tot ziens!
rainbowMonday 24th of May 2004 10:14:41 AM
- I agree, I can understand German too. Well, most of it. but I also have it at school. I can understand most Germans, but I can't talk back in German, because there are some difficult differences.
CrimsonWolfMonday 24th of May 2004 10:28:31 AM
- so is it safe to say that germans can understand dutch and the dutch can understand german but speaking it is the problem? i guess its comparable to modern english and old english. we can read it and understand it, but speaking it is a different story. now, what about flemmish? as i understand, they speak a variation of dutch. so i would assume that they can function quite well in a dutch-rich environment but do you think they can understand german as you have implied? and vice versa? im facinated and jealous. one of these days i will be fluently bilingual!
StefanMonday 24th of May 2004 12:39:19 PM
- [quote]Originally posted by CrimsonWolf


so is it safe to say that germans can understand dutch and the dutch can understand german but speaking it is the problem? i guess its comparable to modern english and old english. we can read it and understand it, but speaking it is a different story. [/quote]

You have the same situation with Swedish/Norwegian/Danish - You speak your own language and the other party replies in their language and you both understand each other (given you WANT to understand each other to begin with... ;))

The same relasionship applies with also eg Finnish/Estonian and Spanish/Portugese (however in the latter case you often get into the situation where people don't want to understand each other due to historical reasons :D).
CrimsonWolfMonday 24th of May 2004 12:48:12 PM
- this is all very interesting. thanks guys to the insight
rainbowTuesday 25th of May 2004 11:12:10 AM
- Flemmish is pretty much like CrimsonWolf has said. But I can understand Flemmish better than German, because it is more like Dutch. The most of the Flemmish words are the same as in Dutch, they only sound softer, a bit more like singing, like the French language. I am not sure, but I think Flemmish people understand German too, because there are living also Germanspeaking people in Belgium.
CrimsonWolfTuesday 25th of May 2004 11:44:04 AM
- one of my friends is from belgium and he speaks vlaanders nederlands duits en engles. he has said that they are all very comparable and most are interchangable when you listen closely. its kinda funny though, cause he feels like nederlands is an abomination of vlaanders and my other friend thinks the opposite. guess its like the queen's english and american english.
dag!
SpartikusTuesday 25th of May 2004 01:40:16 PM
Swiss - Has anyone ever heard schweizerdeutsch? i can understand it about 99% as good as regular german, but cant speak a word of it. =P
CrimsonWolfTuesday 25th of May 2004 01:43:24 PM
- cant say ive ever heard of it. what is it exactly? a bastardization of german like esperanto was to spanish? what a joke! i cant believe anyone thought that language would go anywhere.
SpartikusWednesday 26th of May 2004 12:25:54 PM
what it is - Schweizerdeutsch is SwissGerman, its whats they talk in Switzerland.sounds kindal like a combination of french/german.
HermanMonday 31st of May 2004 01:07:08 AM
German Phrase - Wie ist dein Name {Is wrong}
The Correct Form in German is!!

Wie heisst du ? or
Wie heissen Sie ? for the polite form

kathy84Monday 07th of June 2004 12:36:40 PM
- I know I'm quite late to answer on this. But there are some things here I really which to correct.
I'm a Flemish person and I have to say that the differences between Dutch and Flemish are really minor. The main difference is ofcourse the pronounciation (as every Flemish and Dutch person would agree with me). There are also some vocabulary differences (e.g. wortel in Flanders-peen in the Netherlands; carrot in English) but these differences are really minor. You could ALMOST compare the difference with American and British English, but Dutch and Flemish are closer to another. We can easily use the same dictionaries and spelling guides ('Het Groene Boekje' like 'Duden' in for the German language) Dutch literature is read by Flemish people and visa versa.
Oh and by the way, the Flemish don't usually say they speak Flemish but they say they speak Dutch. Which is another prove the languages are actually the same.
Conclusion: like someone has said: the Flemish pronounciation is just softer, and that's mainly it.
Kathy84Monday 07th of June 2004 12:49:21 PM
- @CrimsonWolf: I wouldn't count on being bilingual once you mastered Dutch. What everyone said here is very exaggerated to my personal opinion. ok, German and Dutch are alike, but they're still different languages. If they would be so similar like some has said here we could say Dutch is a variation of German or visa versa. As a Dutch-speaking person (both Flemish and Dutch!) it is easier to understand German that's right but I'm sure you can't make a good conversation between a Dutch and a German. You will understand something, but that's not a conversation isn't it?
So I'm sorry to disappoint you. If you want a conversation with a German, you'll have to learn German (or be lucky your companion speaks English or Dutch)

@Stefan: I'm studying swedish, and you're right when you're saying Swedish and Norvegian are understandable to another. But Danish... I really have difficulties with understanding this. Maybe that's because I'm not a native speaker, but I guess you have to admit Danish is not as close to Swedish as Norvegian is to it.
StefanMonday 07th of June 2004 08:30:14 PM
- [quote]Originally posted by Kathy84
@Stefan: I'm studying swedish, and you're right when you're saying Swedish and Norvegian are understandable to another. But Danish... I really have difficulties with understanding this. Maybe that's because I'm not a native speaker, but I guess you have to admit Danish is not as close to Swedish as Norvegian is to it.[/quote]

Depends a bit on which part of Sweden you are from. The dialects in south of Sweden is much closer to Danish then the dialects in middle & north of Sweden.
Kathy84Tuesday 08th of June 2004 03:19:08 AM
- I'm not learning any dialects actually (not yet at least, I'm still in the first fase of learning) So are Danish and the OFFICIAL Swedish (spoken in Stockholm if I'm not mistaken) close to one another?
StefanTuesday 08th of June 2004 08:18:36 AM
- [quote]Originally posted by Kathy84
I'm not learning any dialects actually [/quote]

Actually you are always learning one dialect or another, even if it happens to be the "official" :)

[quote]
So are Danish and the OFFICIAL Swedish (spoken in Stockholm if I'm not mistaken) close to one another?[/quote]

The dialect in Stockholm is not the official one, but pretty close. If you think "official" Danish and "official" Swedish are close or not I guess depends on what you define close as.
For me, originally from Malmö, Swedens third largest city located only 15km from the Danish capital Köbenhavn "official" Danish certainly is close to Swedish.

I guess that is as accurate an answer as you are going to get, becuse with dialects and languages with a common origin it's never a black and white issue but a greyscale.

CrimsonWolfTuesday 08th of June 2004 08:20:39 AM
- @CrimsonWolf: I wouldn't count on being bilingual once you mastered Dutch. What everyone said here is very exaggerated to my personal opinion. ok, German and Dutch are alike, but they're still different languages. If they would be so similar like some has said here we could say Dutch is a variation of German or visa versa. As a Dutch-speaking person (both Flemish and Dutch!) it is easier to understand German that's right but I'm sure you can't make a good conversation between a Dutch and a German. You will understand something, but that's not a conversation isn't it?
So I'm sorry to disappoint you. If you want a conversation with a German, you'll have to learn German (or be lucky your companion speaks English or Dutch)


Kathy,
I was not implying that i would be bilingual. I was demonstrating that the two languages are indeed very similar though they are not interchangable. I am not naive enough to think that i can cut corners in the language world. I however do want to thank you for your insight and help.
MichiganderSaturday 03rd of July 2004 05:48:10 PM
Comparitive Language - One of the strangest languages I have ever heard is Letzenburgish, the language of Luxembourg. It is a combination of German and French, both of which they all understand. Most of them also speak English and can understand Dutch. Dutch and German, of course, are not as distinct as one might think. Along the Dutch-German border the dialects can be almost indistinguishable, and they can readily understand each other. Of course a person from Berlin speaking with an Amsterdamer has more troubles. It is interesting in reading 15th century Dutch because there are some more similarities with German that no longer exist. For example many older Dutch dialects used 'du' instead of 'je.' Frisian uses 'do' Ik hoop deze iets interesants is. het beste.
dawnSunday 25th of July 2004 01:51:17 PM
- i come from scotland but moved to the nederlands when i was 20 (6 years ago) i taught myself nederlands and now speak very well. recently i worked in the keukenhof as gastvrouw (Jacoba van Bieren!) where i encountered tourists of every nationality, although i have got to admit it, there was alot of pulling faces and arm flapping going on, i manage on many occations to converse with german speakers. my dutch colleuges however were all able to speak german very well, but mostly they had studied it for a few years at school (which helps). it is very easy to understand belgian i find africaans difficult, whenever there are africaans on the telivision it is sub titled. i noticed there are also vauge similarities between scandinavian lanuages and dutch. i have never heard frisian spoken.
Leto_AtreidesMonday 08th of November 2004 07:41:16 AM
- [quote]Originally posted by Spartikus


Has anyone ever heard schweizerdeutsch? i can understand it about 99% as good as regular german, but cant speak a word of it. =P[/quote]

My father went to his german colleuges once, and he said the germans think that the Swiss talk like farmers :)