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carla1604Tuesday 22nd of March 2005 06:00:01 PM
grammar questions - Buon giorno a tutti :)
This thread is intended for your Italian questions.

Please, post here specific questions like "how do I say this in Italian"? "How do I use this italian word/expression?" "What does it mean?".
Please, avoid asking about too wide subjects like "verbs in Italian"... I don't want to write a grammar textbook in this thread ;)

Carla

JayveeWednesday 23rd of March 2005 10:42:05 AM
question - To ask for the complete shedule of the doctor, specific with time and day. To ask also if ever they have secretary or assistant for doctor and the name?
carla1604Wednesday 23rd of March 2005 10:14:24 PM
- [quote]Originally posted by Jayvee


To ask for the complete shedule of the doctor, specific with time and day. To ask also if ever they have secretary or assistant for doctor and the name?[/quote]

Ciao Jayvee, :)
ecco le frasi che mi hai chiesto:

Per favore, può dirmi in quali giorni e in che orari riceve il dottore? (Please, could you tell me what’s the complete schedule of the doctor?)

C’è una segretaria o un’assistente? Come si chiama? (is there a secretary or assistant? What’s her name?)

Posso avere un appuntamento col dottore? (Can I make an appointment with the doctor?)

Carla ;)

ZackFriday 25th of March 2005 09:50:06 AM
- Dear Carla,
In my Italian book, I believe it said the way to say "come here" was "qui va". I thought va meant to go in the you/he/she form. Also, how would you say "Are you ok?" On www.bbc.co.../../languages it said suo, sua, tuo, and tua were the ways to say "your" when speaking to one person. How would you say "you are funny." Would it start out as "sua/suo" or "Lei sono"? You should check out the language section of BBC and see if there is anything you can expand on their information. You may also get some great game ideas. The site has been extremely helpful to me e grazie, Carla, per la sua aiuta. Is that right?

Zack
carla1604Friday 25th of March 2005 06:37:45 PM
- Hi Zack, :)
1)Come here in italian is vieni qui.
Vieni is the imperative tense of venire, to come, 2nd person singular.
E.g. Vieni con me = Come with me

2)Va is present tense of andare (to go), 3rd person singular,
E.g. Mio figlio va a scuola tutti i giorni = My son goes to school every day

3) Va’ (with the apostrophe) is the truncated form of vai, imperative tense of andare, 2nd person singular.
E.g. Vai (or Va’) a scuola! E’ tardi! = Go to school! It’s late!

4) Suo, sua, tuo, tua are both possessive adjectives and pronouns.
Please notice that the English “your” (possessive adjective) is different from “you are” (personal pronoun + verb to be).
In the sentence “you are funny” there’s no possessive.

“You are funny” in italian is either “tu sei divertente” (2nd singular person) or “voi siete divertenti” (2nd plural person), depending on you are talking with one or more people. The subject is usually omitted, so it’s good to say “sei divertente” or “siete divertenti”.
If you want to use formal speech, you should say: “lei è divertente”. Formal speech is used mostly when addressing a person you do not know. With friends, relatives, colleagues, children the pronoun “tu” is used.

Please, address me with “tu”, and let me know if you need more explanations. ;)

Carla


ZackThursday 07th of April 2005 08:31:45 AM
- Grazie, per la Sua aiuta. I have another thing to ask. Can you give me some examples of masculine and feminine ways of saying of and from. I know some are da, di, dalla, and dagli. Thanks
ZackSaturday 09th of April 2005 09:57:04 AM
- Ciao, Carla!!!!! Questo è stupendo! Guarda che cosa io fado!......à è Ì Ò Ù ù ì. Finalmente! Cool beans, huh? Adesso posso dico "Questo è mio fratello" and "Dov'è la mia penna?" Ciao, e grazie. Ha un buongiorno.
jeffphillySaturday 09th of April 2005 08:31:36 PM
- una dormanda per favore (beh, due dormande veramente...)

A cui si riferisce "ci" con farcela?....per esempio..ce la faccio, ecc

[what does the "ci" refer to in farcela (to make it, to manage)? ]

A cui si riferisce "ne" con andarsene? Si puo' usare molti verbi in questo modo? Non capisco esattamente cosa vuol dire "ritornarsene", "restarsene", "starsene", e non posso trovare nell mio dizionario.

[what does the "ne" refer to in andarsene (to go away)? I see its use with ritornarsene, restarsene, starsene but these are hard to find in the dictionary]


carla1604Saturday 09th of April 2005 10:22:54 PM
- [quote]Originally posted by Zack


Grazie, per la Sua aiuta. I have another thing to ask. Can you give me some examples of masculine and feminine ways of saying of and from. I know some are da, di, dalla, and dagli. Thanks[/quote]
:)
Hi Zack,
In Italian the prepositions di, a, da, in, su, are often combined with definite articles to form compound prepositions (preposizioni articolate).
See my post at [url]http://www.phrasebase.c../../discuss/read.php?TID=3547[/url] for an explanation about definite articles.

Definite articles

il, lo - masculine singular
la - feminine singular
i, gli - masculine plural
le - feminine plural

Compound prepositions (preposition + article)

di + il, lo = [color=blue]del, dello[/color]
di + la = [color=blue]della[/color]
di + i, gli = [color=blue]dei, degli[/color]
di + le = [color=blue]delle[/color]
Examples:
il calore [color=blue]del[/color] sole, il cane [color=blue]dello[/color] zio, l'inizio [color=blue]della[/color] primavera, il capo [color=blue]dei[/color] ribelli, il canto [color=blue]degli[/color] uccelli, il profumo [color=blue]delle[/color] rose
the heat of the sun, my uncle’s dog, the beginning of spring, the leader of the rebels (or the rebel leader) , the scent of roses, birdsong (or the song of birds)

a + il, lo = [color=blue]al, allo[/color]
a + la = [color=blue]alla[/color]
a + i, gli = [color=blue]ai, agli[/color]
a + le = [color=blue]alle[/color]
Examples
andare [color=blue]al[/color] parco, guardarsi [color=blue]allo[/color] specchio, vedere un film [color=blue] alla[/color] televisione, dare da mangiare [color=blue]ai[/color] pesci, dare da mangiare [color=blue]agli[/color] uccelli
to go to the park, to look at oneself in the mirror, to watch a movie on tv, to feed the fishes, to feed the birds

da + il, lo = [color=blue]dal, dallo[/color]
da + la = [color=blue]dalla[/color]
da + i, gli = [color=blue]dai, dagli[/color]
da + le = [color=blue]dalle[/color]
Examples:
andare [color=blue]dal[/color] dottore, venire [color=blue]dallo[/color] spazio, guardare [color=blue]dalla[/color] finestra, una bambina [color=blue]dai[/color] capelli lunghi, una donna [color=blue]dagli[/color] occhi azzurri, [color=blue]dalle[/color] due alle sette
to go to the doctor, to come from the space, to look out of the window, a long-haired little girl, a blue-eyed woman, from 2:00 to 7:00

in + il, lo = [color=blue]nel, nello[/color]
in + la = [color=blue]nella[/color]
in + i, gli = [color=blue]nei, negli[/color]
in + le = [color=blue]nelle[/color]
Examples:
[color=blue]nel [/color]bosco, [color=blue]nello[/color] stagno, [color=blue]nella[/color] cucina, [color=blue]nei[/color] boschi, [color=blue]negli[/color] stagni, [color=blue]nelle[/color] cucine
in the wood, in the pond, in the kitchen, in the woods, in the ponds, in the kitchens

su + il, lo = [color=blue]sul, sullo[/color]
su + la = [color=blue]sulla[/color]
su + i, gli = [color=blue]sui, sugli[/color]
su + le = [color=blue]sulle[/color]
Examples:
[color=blue]sul[/color] tavolo, [color=blue]sullo[/color] scaffale, [color=blue]sulla[/color] sedia, [color=blue]sui[/color] tavoli, [color=blue]sugli[/color] scaffali, [color=blue]sulle[/color] sedie
on the table, on the shelf, on the chair, on the tables, on the shelves, on the chairs

The preposition con may or not be combined with definite articles. The compound forms are mostly used in spoken language, but I like better to use con and the article separately.
con + il, lo = [color=blue]col, collo[/color]
con + la = [color=blue]colla[/color]
con + i, gli = [color=blue]coi, cogli[/color]
con + le = [color=blue]colle[/color]

Notice that the compound prepositions dello, della, dallo, dalla, allo, alla, nello, nella, sullo, sulla become dell', dall', all', nell', sull' before nouns - either masculine or feminine - starting with a vowel.

Carla
;)
carla1604Saturday 09th of April 2005 10:55:50 PM
- [quote]Originally posted by jeffphilly
una dormanda per favore (beh, due dormande veramente...)

A cui si riferisce "ci" con farcela?....per esempio..ce la faccio, ecc

[what does the "ci" refer to in farcela (to make it, to manage)? ]

A cui si riferisce "ne" con andarsene? Si puo' usare molti verbi in questo modo? Non capisco esattamente cosa vuol dire "ritornarsene", "restarsene", "starsene", e non posso trovare nell mio dizionario.

[what does the "ne" refer to in andarsene (to go away)? I see its use with ritornarsene, restarsene, starsene but these are hard to find in the dictionary]

[/quote]

Hi Jeff, :)
It’s hard to explain what “ci” and “ne” mean because most Italians just use idioms without asking themselves what every single word means.

Farcela
I guess that “ci” in “farcela” means “here”, in this particular situation.

Andarsene, ritornarsene, restarsene
I think “ne” in these idioms refers to a generic place to where one is coming back or going away from.
“Ne” in “andarsene” means “via”, “away”. Andarsene and andare via have the same meaning.
“Ne” in “tornarsene” and “restarsene” means “lì”, “there”.
With “ritornarsene” and “restarsene”, the use of “ne” is pleonastic, that is unnecessary. It would be the same thing to say “ritornare”, “restare”.

In some other idioms, “ne” has a different meaning.
“Fregarsene”, “infischiarsene” (to not give a damn): here “ne” means “of it”, “of that thing”.

If you look up the base verb (andare, tornare, stare etc.) in the dictionary, you will find idioms in which that verb is used.
Is that clear enough? Any other questions?

Carla ;)

jeffphillySunday 10th of April 2005 06:52:50 AM
- ok..grazie..so andarsene = andare via

and other verbs ritornarsene, restaresene...it is superfluous...starsene also?

fregarsene = cheat oneself of something?
carla1604Sunday 10th of April 2005 07:15:51 PM
- Hi Jeff,
:)
Yes, “ne” is superfluous in “starsene” also.

Fregare (transitive form) literally means “to rub”, “to scrub”.

Fregare has several slang meanings:
1- “to steal, to pinch, to nick”, as in: “mi hanno fregato il portafogli” – “someone has stolen my wallet”
2 - “to cheat”, as in: "In quel negozio mi hanno fregato: mi hanno venduto un telefono che non funziona" – “They cheated me(?) in that stole: they sold me a telephone that doesn’t work (?)”
3 - Fregarsene (intransitive form) means “not to care about something”, “not to give a damn about something”
"lui se ne frega del lavoro" – “he doesn’t give a damn about his work”

Carla ;)
ma_jaThursday 14th of April 2005 01:32:30 AM
telefono - Ciao Carla,

puoi aiutarmi? Come faccio per presentarmi al telefono? Dico: "Buon giorno, ecco Maja..." oppure "sono Maja"?
M.
carla1604Thursday 14th of April 2005 02:56:01 PM
telefono - Ciao Maja,
puoiu dire "buon giorno, sono Maya", "salve, sono Maya", "Ciao, sono Maya".

Ecco due esempi di brevi conversazioni telefoniche, la prima formale e la seconda informale.

Il telefono squilla...

[color=blue]persona n.1: Pronto? /Pronto, chi parla? [/color]
[color=red]persona n.2: Buon giorno/buona sera, sono xxx. Potrei parlare con yyy?[/color]
[color=blue]persona n.1: Certo, glielo passo subito/No, non è in casa, richiami più tardi.[/color]
[color=red]persona n.2: Grazie, arrivederci[/color]
[color=blue]persona n.1: Prego, buon giorno/buona sera[/color]

[color=blue]persona n.1: Pronto? /Pronto, chi parla?[/color]
[color=red]persona n.2: Ciao, sono xxx. Mi passi yyy per favore?[/color]
[color=blue]persona n.1: Si, subito/Sì, sta arrivando/No, non c’è, puoi richiamare più tardi?[/color]
[color=red]persona n.2: Ok, grazie, ciao[/color]
[color=blue]persona n.1: Prego, ciao[/color]

Carla

:) :) :)
ma_jaThursday 14th of April 2005 04:04:56 PM
- Molto grazie, Carla.
:)


ZackSunday 24th of April 2005 08:08:49 AM
- Ciao, Carla. Aiutarmi, per favore. Nel mio librio è dice "alla" è "to the" in inglese, e anche " of the." Cosi, è questo preciso?

A presto,
Joseph Zachary Brewer
carla1604Sunday 24th of April 2005 11:31:56 PM
- Hi Zack, :)
Please could you give me some example?

"of the" usually means "del", "dello", "della", "degli", "delle".

Though, bear in mind that often English verbs require different prepositions as the correspondent Italian verbs.
E.g.
She's thinking of you - Lei sta pensando a te
He's very kind to me - Lui è molto gentile con me
He's trying to learn Italian - Lui sta cercando di imparare l'Italiano

;)
Carla


carla1604Sunday 24th of April 2005 11:57:57 PM
- [quote]what are the question words in italian?

who
what
where
when
why
how
how many
[/quote]
Hi everyone,
:)

I've been asked that question, here's my answer:

Who = chi (interrogative pronoun - used only in interrogative sentences)
Chi bussa alla porta? - Who's knocking at the door?

what = che cosa, often shortened with che or cosa (interrogative pronoun)
Che cosa fai? - What are you doing?

Where = dove (adverb)
Dove vai? - Where are you going?

When = quando (adverb)
Quando torni? - When are you coming back?

Why = perché (conjunction)
Perché studi l'italiano? - Why are you studying Italian?

How = come (adverb)
Come stai? - How are you?

How many = quanti/quante (indefinite adjective - it has to agree with the noun that it refers to)
Quanti fratelli hai? - How many brothers do you have?
Quante sorelle hai? - How many sisters do you have?

Carla ;)


ZackMonday 25th of April 2005 12:58:20 AM
- Ecco esempi: Vada ALLA tavola. <<<(alla: to the)

Lei è davanti ALLA porta. <<<(alla: of the)



jeffphillyMonday 25th of April 2005 05:23:08 AM
- Zack: the prepositions to use vary a bit..there is no one way to translate "to" in Italian..they depend often on the preceding verb or adverb, or the noun to follow:

1. andare + a ... you often use "a" with the verb andare when followed by an infinitive

2. davanti + a.... davanti = in front, davanti a = in front of

this is different than "to Mario's place" ..here you use "da" example: da Mario, etc

"alla" can be used in a sense of "in the way of" example:
le lasagne alla ....
carla1604Monday 25th of April 2005 05:46:51 AM
- Hi Zack,
As I said in a previous post, each italian verb (as well as english verbs) require its own preposition (or prepositions, according to the various meanings), in most cases they are not the same as the english ones.
So, when you want to use an italian verb, you should look at the examples on the dictionary. Unfortunately, there are no rules about prepositions.
Prepositions (english prepositions) are hard for me too :(

Carla

Carla
ZackTuesday 26th of April 2005 06:26:11 PM
- Va bene, io conosco adesso. Grazie a tutti.