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CroppyBoy722Saturday 26th of March 2005 01:43:44 PM
Studying Japanese - Sure, there are tons of resources out there, but how do you use them?
I know it sounds like a stupid question, but what I mean is; how do you study and learn japanese? How do you memorize everything? What are somethings some of you have done to make it easier?
thanks
ancsisanSunday 29th of May 2005 01:56:33 PM
Learning Japanese - There are two things that work for me:
1. cards: e.g. you take a little card, write the word in kanji on one side, the reading and meaning on the other and just practise, practise, practise everywhere, I practise even while on my way to the universtiy / work, waiting in lines, etc... making cards is a little time-consuming but it's worth it ... oh, and if you're lucky, you can even buy pre-printed cards, e.g here there is a possibility to buy such cards with the kanjis printed on them necessary for the four levels of the Nouryoku shiken (international Japanese language exam)
2. listening&learning by heart: sometimes it is worth memorizing the listening texts-at least it works for me:)

Aniko
AxystosSunday 29th of May 2005 05:42:14 PM
- I also (try to) practise kanji on a regular basis, but sometimes I noticed that when you haven't seen a particular kanji for a while, I forget the way how it was written. This is very frustrating.
PsyMonday 30th of May 2005 08:23:05 AM
- If you're doing flash cards with kanji, it's best to write them yourself. That way it will be less problematic remembering the stroke order. Once you've done around 1,000 of them-- aside from being utterly sick of it-- the drawing of all but the strangest characters will become intuitive.

Regarding study methods, the best option is to have constant exposure to the language. Considering 99% of the learners here don't have that, studying Japanese-- as I've become rather fond of pointing out-- is a royal pain in the navy-blue. What to do? Speak and listen as often as possible. Don't try to learn everything at once. It's better to learn one verb conjugation, a use of a particle, and two or three words at a time then to try packing a way two or three chapters of difficult grammar in a sitting. There is a proverb that goes chiri mo tsumoreba yama to naru. Small things add up-- and it's true.
krisguyMonday 04th of July 2005 11:54:30 PM
- I'm forcing myself to use whatever spare time I have to learn on my own. For example, I have a kanji book that I read between calls and on breaks at work, plus I have various audio lessons stored on my iPod for quick listens to and from work, and on breaks.