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martingaleSaturday 25th of June 2005 07:17:04 PM
numerals - Dav Freja!
I've been looking for inuit numerals and couldn't find it anywhere. Could you give them plz?

Mange tak
FrejaSunday 26th of June 2005 12:58:01 AM
- Aluu martingale! - and welcome to the new discuss :D

In Greenland the Greenlandic numerals for 1-12 are used. This is caused by a system of numerals used in the past where you used the toes and fingers to count with and because of that 20 was called inuk naallugu - a complete human. Therefore e.g. 79 was called four complete humans minus one.
The numerals coming after 12 are Danish where you add an -i like in other foregin words (mostly Danish)
tretteni (13) - tyvi (20)

0 - nuulu, noor'lu
1 - ataaseq
2 - marluk
3 - pingasut
4 - sisamat
5 - tallimat
6* - arfineq,arfinillit
7 - arfineq marluk
8 - arfineq pingasut
9 - qulingiluat, qulaaluat (North Greenlandic), qulaaluat (South Greenlandic)
10 - quilt
11* - aqqaneq, aqqanillit, isikkaneq, isikkanillit (North Greenlandic)
12 - aqqaneq marluk, isikkaneq marluk (North Greenlandic)

* Here the short expression is used with time and when couting. The long expression is used when couting things (years, dogs, houses)

martingaleSunday 26th of June 2005 08:43:50 PM
:) - Dav Freja. Hvordan har Du det? Mange tak.
Thanks for quick answer.
Are all eskimo-aleut languages written in latin? I found some examples written in a strange way, something like all old danish runa.
By the way. You know maybe what "koyaanisqatsi", "powaaqatsi" and "naqoyqatsi" mean. I saw two of those movies and have no idea what the titles mean. They sound like inuit, I believe.
UlvenSunday 26th of June 2005 09:02:43 PM
- haha Martingale, Jeg havde ikke troet om de ord ligne kalaallisut/grønlansk. Det er jo sandt, de ligner grønlandsk.:)
-haha Martingale, I hadn't thought of those words' likeness Kalaallisut/Greenlandic. It's true, they do resemble Kalaallisut (or another aleut/eskimo/inuit language).

Gratulation for den nye discuss, Freja ;).
-Congratulations on the new discuss, Freja.

Jeg synes om hvordan ord for nummer er lavet... "en hel menneske mindre en". Det er sjøvt. :p lol
-I like how Kalaallisut forms its numeral words... "one whole human minus one". So funny and cute.

Freja, do you know what the difference between all the terms eskimo, aleut and inuit are? (Or anyone else who knows).
FrejaSunday 26th of June 2005 09:13:15 PM
- Hej martingale. Jeg har det fint nok. Hvad med dig?
You're welcome. Well, I think they are, but I'm not sure. It's not exactly like runaR. I think they look more like
hieroglyphics.
I've been looking for the Phrases. I could see it wasn't Greenlandic. It's Hopi and isn't exactly an Inuit language, though they may be related somewhere. It's a Northern uto-aztecan language

koyaanisqatsi
n. 1. crazy life. 2. life in turmoil. 3. life disintegrating. 4. life out of balance. 5. a state of life that calls for another way of living
powaqqatsi - Life in transformation
naqoyqatsi - Life as war


FrejaSunday 26th of June 2005 09:27:05 PM
- Inuktitut is an Eskimo-Aleut language spoken across the entire northern span of North America - each dialect is easily mutually intelligible with its neighbors, but not with dialects further away. Yupik, the form used in Siberia and part of Alaska, may be considered a distinct language. It is (or they are) not recognizably related to any other language in the world except Aleut, that of a very few people in the Aleutian Islands. For practical purposes, linguistic chains are treated as a single language, and so the Alaskan dialects Inupiaq and Inupiatun, the Eastern and Western Inuktitut languages of Canada, and Greenlandic are all classified together. "Eskimo" is considered an offensive term by many Inuit today.
The term Inuit is preferred to Eskimo by many in Canada, the term is retained here because it properly refers to any Eskimo group, not only the Inuit and its use is widespread in Native communities in Alaska.


Hmm, if that makes any sense? :D

Ulveven! Qujanaq! :D Yep, Greenlandic is funny :p