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AshleeFriday 01st of October 2004 04:57:00 AM
Pimsleur Approach - [url=http://www.pimsleurapproach.com]www.pimsleurapproach.com[/url]

I've had my eye on the Pimsleur Approach tapes for a while.. I know that they alone couldn't teach a language, and would probably only help with pronunciation and comprehension.. but I'm still a bit unsure about them. The whole site seems awfully scam-ish to me.

E.g. For some of the languages you can learn they have only Level 1, for others they have Level 1 and 2, and some (like Russian) have a Level 3 as well. Yet no matter how many levels listed for the different languages, they all claim to teach you to speak the language fluently (using the 2,500 distinct words and phrases a native would use on a daily basis).

So you can speak Norwegian fluently in 10 hours! But you can also speak Russian fluently in 45 hours! What's the difference between learning Norwegian and Russian, if you're learning it 'as though you were a child'? The only difference I see is that they only have Level 1 tapes for Norwegian, but they have Levels 1, 2 and 3 Tapes/CDs for Russian and it costs a whole lot more too.

I checked the English learning Cassettes, and depending on how many Levels they have available (whether it be 'English for Italian speakers', 'English for Russian speakers' etc.) it takes you a different amount of time to learn English fluently. E.g. 15 hours if you're a Russian speaker (although it would take us 45 hours to learn their language) and 45 hours if you're Japanese, because they have more tapes, but only 15 hours if you're Chinese, because they have less tapes =\

So I really don't know what to think. Norwegian tapes are $95 which is one of the cheapest things there.. and I'm thinking of getting them to be a starting point for how the language sounds and pronunciation and stuff, but I'm still a bit skeptical.. Has anyone here bought any Pimsleur products before?
Peter fra LASaturday 02nd of October 2004 01:24:26 PM
Pimsleur - [quote]Originally posted by ashleejs
So I really don't know what to think. Norwegian tapes are $95 which is one of the cheapest things there.. and I'm thinking of getting them to be a starting point for how the language sounds and pronunciation and stuff, but I'm still a bit skeptical.. Has anyone here bought any Pimsleur products before?[/quote]

Probably $67 at Amazon.com...... shop around! Oh, and get the CD version as it is much easier to transfer to computer so you can mix and match your own lessons later on if you feel inclined to do so.

Pimsleur Norwegian is good for introduction to pronunciation and getting yourself a good start. But do remember the emphasis is on the word start.

In general, both Female and Male voices interact in a social setting such as at a bar/cafe dealing with simple conversational phrases and builds up the conversation through new lessons into a typical tourist chit-Classroom conversation when two people meet for the first time.

A small booklet is included giving just a tiny list of words for use during the last section of the lessons which deal with learning how to pronounce the written form of the language.

Pimsleur had an interesting method, but he died before completing a lot of language products.

I also use Linguaphone and Eurotalk for language products, the latter has Norwegian offerings, I am not sure regarding the former yet.
WolfkamiWednesday 22nd of December 2004 02:45:12 AM
- I think their audio tapes are usfull, you just
need the time to listen to them.It's funny but I just
started listening to some of them because I wanted to see if they are any good.
tinkerbThursday 23rd of December 2004 09:36:32 AM
-
I'm a big fan of the Pimsleur method and use it when I can afford to buy the tapes (the pricetag is sometimes cost prohibitive). The ability to learn phrases without being attached to a book or computer is fantastic.

It's the same methodology as Phrasebase, only it teaches you to understand and recall basic conversations that you will need while abroad.

I posted a little bit more info here:

http://www.phrasebase.c../../discuss/read.php?TID=2220

And just so you know, if you order online and are willing to investigate different prices, you can find the sets used and new for very, very cheap. Some of the $345 USD sets are available for $100, and I've found some of the compacts (retailing for $95) for $20.
HyacinthGardenThursday 30th of December 2004 10:45:15 AM
- I first bought a very condensed version of Russian 1 from Pimsleur for 20$ from Barnes and Noble (www.bn.com if you don't have a Barnes and Noble in your area). It worked really well for me. If you're just looking for a start, then Pimsleur is a good one I think. The Russian CDs were so productive for me that I got the same condensed version of Japanese, Spanish, and French. I realize I'm not going to be fluent in these languages from Pimsleur, but it's sending me down that road...

Besides, most language courses on tape or CD cost a lot... I don't really think Pimsleur's pricing is unique, or maybe it's just my area where the language stuff costs a lot?
SchnorkMonday 03rd of January 2005 01:41:30 AM
- Hi there I'm new. My experience with Pimsleur (Russian) is that it is good for giving you a good start on the language. It would be a great advantage for someone who was about to move to another country but if you are not you had better get out the text books and finish learning. Well either way you will have to get out some text books. Pimsleur is good for giving you practice speaking and comprehending.You should be able to construct your own sentences in a short amount of time. The trouble with Pimsleur is that 3 levels is not enough to get you fluent by any means. Needs maybe 10 I'd, guess just to get you comfortable. Maybe more. Then you have to consider the cost. Is it worth it. For me it surly is but I bought the entire course (3 levels) for $15. I am also fortunate to live where there are plenty of native Russian speakers to check myself with. Although Pimsleur gives no lessons in grammar, it does allow one to see a definite pattern in the word endings that you use. This helps me to understand the concepts laid out in my text book. All in all, I'd say that if they made level four in Pimsleur Russian that I would find a way to get it. I just don't know if I would pay $200 bucks for it.
AlexWednesday 05th of January 2005 01:23:42 AM
My bad - I guess I'm the only one who has a problem with Pimsleur.

While I don't argue that the Irish tapes helped me with initial pronounciation, the only thing that I could really do at the end of the cycle was to ask a girl out, offer her a glass of beer or wine and ask her if she wanted to come back to my hotel room.

Not exactly fluency there.

I have been told by those who purchased the Romanian version that the subject matter is identical.

I would qualify the method as a good primer or something useful if you intend to take a trip and want to go to a local bar, but no more than that.

Listen to the tapes, and if you like the language, get some real materials, and someone on Phrasebase to help you with pronounciation.

Just my two cents.
krs240Tuesday 11th of January 2005 11:07:37 AM
- I would suggest checking your library to see if they have pimsleur tapes. My library has quite of few, and where I live we have a very small library. I decided to give the russian tapes a go. It is the condensed russian version, and I cant say that Ive learned much new content. However it definately reinforced what I already knew. I am probably going to buy Russian II, once I see a used set on ebay. The only gripes I have about Pimsleur is that so far it seems to only teach the most polite sayings, and doesnt give much of a vocabulary. Vocab is the easy part in my humble opinion, so you be the judge on that one.

Pimsleur has also turned out to be great at helping me keep the house clean. Im serious too, Pimsleur makes cleaning my room or doing the dishes no big deal.
GoranBcnWednesday 12th of January 2005 08:58:42 AM
- A lot of Pimsleur lessons can be downloaded from internet if you use p2p software, "e-mule" or similar
english-test.netSunday 16th of January 2005 05:16:48 AM
learning a language - Hello everyone,

First off, Phrasebase.com is a fantastic place to find interesting people like who I can share my language learning experiences with.
In this thread you are discussing the Pimsleur method. May I ask you, did Dr. Pimsleur really develop a method? A systen that enables you to learn another language? I mean, do you think such a method or system actually exists? Aren't the Pimsleur audio tapes just well marketed products for people who are too lazy to analyze their own language situation? I'm truly convinced of this: Any person is able to learn any language provided they create the appropriate environment. So, what Pimsleur tapes actually do is give you exposure to the language you want to learn. Mind you, Pimsleur is not a method. It's just cassettes or CD's with audio recordings on them. The recordings don't contain anything Pimsleur has created. Instead of spending hundreds of Dollars on Pimsleur tapes you could as well get authentic resources that are appropriate for your learning needs. In order to learn a language you basically need two things: A keen interest in a subject and language rescources related to your subject. What you have to do is view the language not as the goal but the means to achieve that goal.
Let me know what you think and maybe we can continue this discussion?

HyacinthGardenSunday 16th of January 2005 10:31:27 AM
- [quote]First off, Phrasebase.com is a fantastic place to find interesting people like who I can share my language learning experiences with.[/quote]

Yes, it is.

[quote]In this thread you are discussing the Pimsleur method. May I ask you, did Dr. Pimsleur really develop a method? A systen that enables you to learn another language? I mean, do you think such a method or system actually exists?[/quote]

Of course there's no such thing as a "method" that works for everyone. However, I do think there is such a thing as a style of learning that works for certain people... And yes, I would call that a "method".

[quote]Aren't the Pimsleur audio tapes just well marketed products for people who are too lazy to analyze their own language situation?[/quote]

I do not see anyone lazy in this thread. Also, do YOU know their language needs? How do you know whether or not Pimsleur would help these people? You don't know the ways in which they learn best.

[quote]In order to learn a language you basically need two things: A keen interest in a subject and language rescources related to your subject.[/quote]

You're stating the obvious. All the people in this thread have "a keen interest" in their target languages, and... it certainly looks to me as though they're asking and giving advice on language resources.

[quote]What you have to do is view the language not as the goal but the means to achieve that goal.[/quote]

I disagree. It's wonderful to learn a language for access to another culture, but what about people who simply enjoy languages themselves? Learning a language is a fullfilling thing on its own, enriching. I enjoy the process of learning languages almost more than I enjoy using the languages.
english-test.netSunday 16th of January 2005 03:31:25 PM
Apologies - Hello again,

You see, I'd like to apologize to all of you participating in this thread for my remarks about people being too 'lazy' to analyze their language situation. You are of course right - I don't know your particular situation and your initial question was whether Pimsleur is good or not.
Of course, those audio tapes will be helpful to someone who really wants to learn a language. However, you might find better and more effective resources for the same monetary investment. Why not use authentic materials? Why pay hundreds of dollars for a set of (artificial?) dialogues? You could as well listen to a 'real' audio book that contains a story as well as dialogues. Find something that suits your current language level. This gives you the opportunity to hear an interesting story on top of learning a new language.
chinita96Monday 17th of January 2005 07:08:19 AM
- I do not like the Pimsleur approach. I think it is a good tool for hearing pronunciation, but not for learning more in depth about any language. Of course, this is my opinion.

Everyone learns in their own personal way, some might learn by listening, while others learn by a more structured approach. I am the type of person that has to see the words being spoken and the grammar structure behind it. Pimsleur does nothing for me except frustrates me.

I stick to my traditional lesson book, grammar book, and cassettes(cds) if available. I am the type of person that likes to figure out how the language is structured while learning it. Grammar is very important to me.

I think the only thing Pimsleur will help me with is pronunciation, but I've heard that the Pimsleur Irish (which would be most useful to me right now) is not spoken by all native speakers and varies in dialects. I think if they're going to develop a listening only learning tool, then atleast stick to one dialect and don't confuse us with the other ones.
tinkerbTuesday 18th of January 2005 09:20:11 AM
-

I can't speak for Pimsleur Irish; if it isn't done with all native speakers from some of the more prominent dialects, it should be redone.

I have thought about this a bit, especially the problems that Alex mentioned earlier.

Pimsleur has a lot of different programs. The Compact program is a series of 10 lessons. They always start out with an American man (usually on an airplane) seated next to a native woman. The first conversation always goes something like this:

Man: Excuse me, do you speak English? Do you understand?
Woman: No, sir. Do you speak [target]language?
Man: A little.
Woman: Are you American?
Man: Yes, ma'am, I am American.

The series follows teaching you how to invite someone out to eat, to get a drink, and other small social functions.

The Comprehensive courses (usually numbered I,II, and III) teach you more practical information, such as how to ask directions, basic social courtesies, culture tips, and more. It's a longer series of lessons. I haven't done one in awhile, but the Russian series was a great review before my last trip over there. It all depends on what you are looking for in a method.

In all Pimsleur courses, the dialogues try and encourage the listener to imitate pronunciation and syntax, which is very important. At the very beginning, pronunciation is important, but a series of these tapes plus working with a native speaker is likely to push the user into the intermediate-mid or intermediate-high level. This is something that concerns me as of late--the fact that most language learners never reach the intermediate-high or advanced stages. Perhaps this is brings up to a topic for another thread, but I thought it was a good idea to point out a few flaws in the method as well as some of the positive points for those who can use the method to actually learn and remember.
JadokesaWednesday 19th of January 2005 04:27:25 AM
- It also depends on what language you are learning, and previous experience of it. It is good to know the basics of pronunciation, as repeating a word aloud often helps remembering it. But, as the lover of knowledge and studies I am, I'd prefer knowing basic grammar, vocabulary and phrases before practicing pronunciation. Unless you are going for a trip and would not be interested in the language otherwise.

I have a tape with Estonian (not Pimsleur, though), and I find it very easy to use. First a man says the word(s) slowly, then a woman repeats them fast (as in normal speech). I have two books, one with the Estonian phrases/words, and another with the Swedish Phrases. Estonian sounds very similar to Swedish, and I hear clearly what they say. I knew some basic Estonian before I started listening to them.

I dislike the Pimsleur approach, and find my tapes much better. It is quite fun hearing the Swedish one as a native speaker, though. Haha.
UlvenWednesday 19th of January 2005 01:12:50 PM
- I've never bought one of their products because the way they're marketed fills me with "an air of dodginess". It seems money based, without a passion for language. I'd only ever try one if I found it cheaply in a secind hand store.
But, this is an outsider's view. But I've heard enough horror stories about them muffing up dialects and pronunciations to feel pretty confident that its a matter of luck as to whether or not the language you want is well represented. On the Arabic one, I couldn't possibly risk buying it because it gave contadictory information on what dialect was being used. I remember a review confirming my suspicion by saying "Nobody speaks this dialect. The only use you'll get out of it is if you visit a small village called 'so and so' in Syria". I'd pay coins for one, but not notes.
But as I said, this view is just from my picking up ques from its presentation, its price and rewiews from others. The biggest scepticism inducer is its outrageous claims, as if your own input and learning ability and concentration and prefered methods play no role whatsoever in a product's success. No amount of great teaching can replace the learner's role. So, those claims are always a dead give away that the company involved has no idea what it is selling. But, that doesn't mean you can't be lucky that they 'just happen to' get your language right.

I'm just curious- Of those of you who deem Pimsleur good (or bad, for that matter), has you Pimsleur education actually beem tested in conversations with native speaker of the target language. I haven't heard any tell of whether natives deem your Pimsleur education as a success or a bit dodgy.:)Anyone got stories f natives pinning holes in your application of what you'd learnt from the product? Or, praise praised application?
riproarUMThursday 20th of January 2005 04:25:27 AM
- I've used Pimsleur before and had a very good experience with it. You might consider staying away from the programs that do not have any Comprehensive levels to advance into (IE: Irish only has a 4 CD version available). I got the Spanish combo (I,II,III,Plus) from a Pimsleur dealer ([url]www.learnitlanguage.com[/url]).

The thing about Pimsleur that needs to be understood is it is not for a person who NEEDS to know and recite the rules for grammar, it is more for people who want to learn fast and subtly recognize grammar through speaking (not reading), hence "learning as a child does". Everyone here should have been able to SPEAK their native tongue long before they were actually able to recite grammar rules and READ it. It works, but if you want to learn the specific rules, you've got to use a program like Rosetta Stone afterwards.

Imagine you are talking to an 8 year old kid. You can hold a conversation with him, but if you ask him about verb conjugation and grammar rules, he will stare at you blindly. He doesn't NEED to know them to SPEAK the language.
UlvenThursday 20th of January 2005 05:06:35 AM
- I agree RiproarUM that reading isn't neccessary for speaking. And as for grammatical rules, even after studying the basics of 20+ languages, I still don't know what 'elessive' means (nor how to spell it:)), nor what exactly is the difference bewteen an 'adverb' and an 'adjective'. I could guess at it well enough, though. But, pretty much every product with an audio tape with speech done at a measured pace can do what you say Pimsleur does. I'm not saying Pimsleur is better or worse at it for the language you used it for. I've not tried it. But English-test.net is totally correct in that there's nothing to suggest that Pimsleur has actually created 'a method'. He may be a great teacher, though. I don't know. But 'listening' isn't exactly an original method of learning languages. Other products have the same. But they also have a grammar book with it, and always suggest listening to the dialogues first without reading. So perhaps Pimsleur is merely excusing itself from the cost of printing up a grammar book. But, if the price is right, then that is not a problem. It's just that I have the impression that it is really expensive. It may be a success for some languages, but a method unto its own? I think that part is a lie and an insult on the products that have just as good an audio set, yet do the extra effort to put in a grammar book aswell for the same price as Pimsleur. I often don't read whilst I listen to my owned products, but at least if I get stuck and need help, there is someone there (the book) to help. Reading is not an ability I'm willing to waste in teacing myself the spoken language. The same as visuals and picture books. They help. And I have conjugation tables books. They help me 'visualize' the verb forms. But I must admit, I do get caught up in being too analytical in my learning. I'd like to ease off and 'just listen' without focusing too hard. But there are childrens book looking items that are a fraction of the cost that help me ease off in the over-thinking department. And they have pictures that are very helpful in helping it stick. In answer to the thread question, my answer says it is both helpful and a scam. Its price says that it should have more than just the tapes. I've never been convinced that Pimsleur has done its homework on language and culture. It seems to have just churn out its products mass-production style. So, even if it is a good product, it doesn't do a good job of 'not feeling like' a scam. To me, anyhow. It comes across as those 'get rich quick' schemes. As if one size fits all. But, it seems that alot of people have been glad they bought Pimsleur, so it must have postives, even if their marketing suggests otherwise.
riproarUMThursday 20th of January 2005 06:48:11 AM
- Ulven,

I hear your concerns! I had those same concerns as do most people who are considering such an investment. You are right, some people are just more analytical learners. Perhaps Pimsleur is not for them. But I will tell you I can't even regurgitate my own language rules accurately, and I WOULD consider myself a fluent English speaker.

As far as the "method" that the Pimsleur system preaches. It is truly a method, yet one would not really be able to distinguish it immediately in comparison to other learning systems if they were not explicitly searching for it:

In my reading, the main difference is HOW the information is being presented, not entirely the information itself. The Pimsleur method hinges on two key principles: Graduated Interval Recall and Principle of Anticipation. If you are unfamiliar with the concepts (I was), consider this excerpt:

[quote]Two Key Principles: Graduated Interval Recall & Principle of Anticipation

Graduated Interval Recall

Graduated Interval Recall is a complex name for a very simple theory about memory. No aspect of learning a foreign language is more important than memory, yet before Dr. Pimsleur's work, no one had explored more effective ways for building language memory. This method reintroduces information at key intervals during the learning process to effectively maximize retention until no reminders are needed.

Principle of Anticipation

The Principle of Anticipation works by challenging you, the listener, to retrieve answers to questions from your own memory. Without interaction with native speakers, stored information becomes meaningless and therefore useless. Pimsleur's teaching method simulates direct interaction between you and a native speaker, immersing you in a meaningful exchange of communication.[/quote]

Now here I didn't quite understand these concepts until I actually used the program. They are different, and they DID help me. The Graduated Interval Recall thing was most noticeable. During times I felt like something was slipping my memory, it was reintroduced - almost as if my memory loss was calculated to the exact point. After later intervals of reintroduction, my retention was much better (hence graduated intervals). This with two native speakers (male and female) and an English tutor. Comprehensives come with booklets too.

I had read a LOT before making my purchase (I am a very analytical buyer), but I am very pleased with my decision. I can hold conversations with my mother-in-law (Spanish) without a hitch.

As far as I've read, the method is patented too (not 100% on that). So it really is a "unique method." I have used Rosetta Stone as well...good results, but I was up and running conversationally with Pimsleur in an exponentially faster period of time (I was surprised). With Rosetta Stone, there was a lot of in-between time with learning rules that really slows you down into SPEAKING Spanish; which, in most cases, is the reason people opt to learn a second language anyway.

I like Pimsleur better than most programs, but that is just my opinion. Perhaps another's style would demand a different approach. My 2 pennies.

[EDIT]
By the way, I did some additional digging on the company "Pimsleur Approach" (www.pimsleurapproach.com). Clever name! They are not actually the manufacturers of the Pimsluer system. It is owned by Simon and Schuster (www.pimsleur.com), Pimsleur being a division of their published products. (It is even written on their boxes)

Moral: Pimsleur may seem like a scam product on Pimsleur Approach's site, but they are just a reseller. Just happens to be his way of pushing the product. But if you see the prices on Simon and Schuster's site, you will immediately try and find a different vendor to buy from! They charge full retail price!

Also, Dr. Pimsleur himself did not manufacture the product. So the product line did not die with him as posted earlier. I hear Polish Comprehensive I is out now.

HyacinthGardenSunday 30th of January 2005 05:27:17 AM
- [quote]
I'm just curious- Of those of you who deem Pimsleur good (or bad, for that matter), has you Pimsleur education actually beem tested in conversations with native speaker of the target language. I haven't heard any tell of whether natives deem your Pimsleur education as a success or a bit dodgy.:)Anyone got stories f natives pinning holes in your application of what you'd learnt from the product? Or, praise praised application?[/quote]

I have a native Russian friend who found my progress in Russian from Pimsleur to be impressive... Of course, that was only my starting point, but she seemed to think it was a good one.
Pathfinder05Wednesday 02nd of February 2005 10:03:45 AM
- I started with the Pimsleur Russian series, first hearing the demos on the website SimonSays. I thought that the method was great, especially people that want to start speaking their target language right away. For me, looking at a book all day in a school classroom is boring, and I don't learn much - right away. I like to get the train to accelerate, instead of taking it's time to gain full speed.

The downside to some Pimsleur tapes, is the listening comprehension, especially with French. I just gave up with the French course from Pimsleur. The other tapes are easy to understand, but the French one is just too hard for me t understand.

I've heard other people complaining that Pimsleur doesn't teach you much vocabulary. Well, that's from their own point of view. I think that you should take a bit of time to learn vocabulary. I like to rush some things, but vocabulary should sink in, and you should get familar and comfortable to use.

Pimsleur is expensive, and many think that it is just a scam to get more money. But, I listened to the first 5 lessons in the Russian series, and I was totally excited. I spoke any Russian word a could to my Russian friend. He was impressed that I knew what I did. I got my moneys worth out of the tapes.

Now, Pimsleur does have a good method, revision. The tapes make you revise the words over and over again, but later on, they fade a way a bit.. but when you just thought that the word would never come up again, bam, you are on lesson 10 and you just got asked that word. I have bought quite a few German and Russian cassette courses which give you the phrase really quick, and then a new phrase comes up. The tapes do not slow down for you, and do not get in detail about the meanings of each and every word.

I would give Pimsleur a 9/10. I would give higher, but it really needs a better 'learn-to-read' section.


ConfuzzWednesday 09th of February 2005 05:54:25 PM
- has anyone had any experience with the "Learn in your car" audio stuff? I managed to win the level 1 for russian for like $2, lol, so I'm not really losing anything if it doens't work....
Pathfinder05Wednesday 09th of February 2005 06:31:54 PM
- Try and see what it does for you. Everyone has their preferences to language learning, so you can't really judge the course upon opinions of others.
mlomkerFriday 11th of February 2005 04:31:32 AM
- I'm very pleased with the Pimsleur Mandarin Chinese I that I'm almost finished with. I'm taking a conventional class at a community college as well and I placed into the 2nd semester of their yearlong program based on that tape set.

I just received the new Vietnamese I comprehensive set today and can't wait to start Classroomting with my Vietnamese friends!
AshleeTuesday 15th of February 2005 02:19:06 PM
- Thanks for your replies, it's good to hear all the viewpoints... So far I think if I can find the program at a low price, it'd be good to learn pronunciation/intonation - something I particularly need help with in Russian. I have seen Pimsleur Instant Conversation, which is a smaller, cheaper version of the program. I personally learn better straight out of grammar books and when given verb conjugation and noun declension tables to memorise, so all I would use audio casettes for is speaking correctly, not to actually learn the language, which is why I think the smaller program would be better ;)

If anyone else has had experiences with the Pimsleur products I'd still be grateful to hear of them.
imiThursday 17th of February 2005 11:48:07 AM
- Yeah I've almost finished Pimsleur Greek I (there is only one level). 30 lessons. It has taught me great conversational Greek, just as has been said in the posts above. I can also read Greek, but it is still close to impossible for me to open a Greek magazine and understand what is being said. The language in real life is far more complex than what Pimsleur prepares you for.
globetrotterSunday 20th of February 2005 06:44:58 AM
Pimsluer French - I have covered the full Pimsleur course in French (about 50 tapes and three levels) I found it excellent. It is necessary to listen to a tape for about 20 to 30 minutes each day, every day. I would also recommend using a dictionary and grammer book.

[quote]Originally posted by Pathfinder05


I started with the Pimsleur Russian series, first hearing the demos on the website SimonSays. I thought that the method was great, especially people that want to start speaking their target language right away. For me, looking at a book all day in a school classroom is boring, and I don't learn much - right away. I like to get the train to accelerate, instead of taking it's time to gain full speed.

The downside to some Pimsleur tapes, is the listening comprehension, especially with French. I just gave up with the French course from Pimsleur. The other tapes are easy to understand, but the French one is just too hard for me t understand.

I've heard other people complaining that Pimsleur doesn't teach you much vocabulary. Well, that's from their own point of view. I think that you should take a bit of time to learn vocabulary. I like to rush some things, but vocabulary should sink in, and you should get familar and comfortable to use.

Pimsleur is expensive, and many think that it is just a scam to get more money. But, I listened to the first 5 lessons in the Russian series, and I was totally excited. I spoke any Russian word a could to my Russian friend. He was impressed that I knew what I did. I got my moneys worth out of the tapes.

Now, Pimsleur does have a good method, revision. The tapes make you revise the words over and over again, but later on, they fade a way a bit.. but when you just thought that the word would never come up again, bam, you are on lesson 10 and you just got asked that word. I have bought quite a few German and Russian cassette courses which give you the phrase really quick, and then a new phrase comes up. The tapes do not slow down for you, and do not get in detail about the meanings of each and every word.

I would give Pimsleur a 9/10. I would give higher, but it really needs a better 'learn-to-read' section.

[/quote]
noi_nhunWednesday 23rd of February 2005 03:56:03 AM
Pimsleur (I think I spelled it right) - I just finished the first course (5 CD's) of Vietnamese and I wish I had found them years ago. I'm planning to get the 30 CD course as soon as I can come up with the money. I think what I like about it is that it really puts you through the grind. You have to use your head. A lot of repitition and that's what I need. I found them a lot cheaper on ebay. Check it out.
english-test.netMonday 23rd of May 2005 11:18:53 PM
Pimsleur questions - Hello everyone,

Could you please help me answer a few questions on the Pimsleur approach. For example I'd like to know how you can effectively learn any language based on an audio program only. I mean, how do you know the spelling of new words? You might be able to speak all right but what if you want to communicate with somebody in writing? Also, how many content and function words do the courses contain? I understand this number depends on the language and the course level but maybe you can give me some information?
Thanks in advance,
Torsten
craig22Tuesday 24th of May 2005 02:42:43 PM
- I found that the Pimsleur approach is good way of learning how to pronounce the words as it will break them down. I have been listening to the Polish CD's and have found them great for speaking and putting together very basic conversations. I have also though bought a phrase book so that I can see how the words are spelt.

Unfortunatly Pimsleur only have level 1 of Polish as far as I am aware. I'm hoping they will bring out perhaps a level 2 or 3!
english-test.netSaturday 25th of June 2005 07:12:41 PM
learning Polish - Hi Graig,

Many thanks for your answer, yes, as of now there is only Pimsleur Level 1 available. If you want to practise your Polish , you might want to get in contact with Polish speakers - I've always find that the most efficient way of learning a language. Maybe, you can get to meet Polish people in your area?