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PsycheTuesday 28th of June 2005 09:01:23 PM
NOUNS - *Under construction*

Norwegian grammar is fairly easy. The nouns are considered to be the hardest grammatical aspect of the Norwegian language and here follows a guide to help you through it.

First of all what is a noun?

A noun is a word that refers to a person, place, thing, event, substance or quality.

Examples of nouns:

A boy, a girl, a house, a tree, a beauty..

Here comes the tricky part:

Norwegian nouns have three genders (masculine, feminine and neuter) and their inflection depends on the gender. You can`t really tell from looking at a word which gender it has, but there are certain "rules" that will make it easier.

Masculine nouns

Where we in English would put an a/an in front of a noun, in masculine Norwegian nouns we`ll put an "en".

En gutt (a boy)
En hund (a dog)
En katt (a cat)

The noun inflects by adding the suffix -en in definite singular, -er in indefinite plural and -ene in def. plural.

En gutt(a boy)-gutten(the boy)-gutter(boys)-guttene(the boys)

En hund (a dog)- hunden (the dog)- hunder (dogs)- hundene
(the dogs)

En katt (a cat) - katten (the cat) - katter (cats)- kattene
(the cats)


If you have to guess what a noun`s gender is, and you don`t know if it`s masculine or feminine and have no ability to check it out, go for the masculine gender.

Feminine nouns

Many feminine nouns can be inflected like masculine nouns (in Bokmål) and many nouns can be both masculine and feminine and you can choose which gender it has.

Where we in English would put an a/an in front of a noun, in feminine Norwegian nouns we`ll put an "ei".

Feminine nouns inflects by adding the suffix -a to the definite singular, and the rest of the inflections follows the same procedure as the masculine nouns.

Ei jente (a girl) - jenten/jenta (the girl) - jenter (girls) - jentene (the girls)

Ei seng* (a bed) - sengen (the bed) - senger (beds) - sengene (the beds)


Note: Every word for a female being, such as jente (girl), kvinne (woman) etc, are feminine nouns. But the others can be masculine and feminine and you can choose which gender you want. Just see how the noun seng can be masculine also:

En seng (a bed) - sengen (the bed) - senger (beds)- sengene (the beds)


Neuter nouns

Most nouns that refers to a non-living thing, is neuter.

E.g

A tree, a house, a fridge, a mountain..

Where we in English would put an a/an in front of a noun, in neuter Norwegian nouns we`ll put an "et".

The nouns inflects by adding the suffix -et to the definite singular, - "no ending" in the indefinite plural and -ene or additionally -a in the definite plural.

Et tre (a tree) - treet (the tree)- tre (trees) - treene/trea (the trees)

Et hus (a house) - huset (the house)- hus (houses) - husene/husa (the houses)


And there are always exceptions to the rule...

You just have to memorize the exceptions as you come across them, but here is a list over common nouns:

En bror (a brother) - brødre (brothers)
En/ei søster (a sister) - søstre (sisters)
En far (a father) - fedrene (the fathers)
En/ei mor (a mother) - mødrene (the mothers)
En fot (a foot) - føtter (feet)
En/ei rot (a root) - røtter (roots)

UlvenTuesday 28th of June 2005 10:12:52 PM
- En gutt = a boy. haha
WARNING: Swedish/Danish-educated person trying to write in Norwegian... (Good luck, me! :D)
Jeg har trodd å på norsk, boy ville være sammen så dansk eller svensk. Men nej. Vi har nu dreng, pojke og gutt :p. Lige finskasprogs 'boy' er mer sammen til svensksprogs boy - poika.

English...
I would have assumed the Norwegian word for boy would be the same as either Swedish or Danish. But no, now we have three different words for boy. Even Finnish's word for boy is more similar to Swedish.
Just for the record-
dreng (Danish)
gutt (norwegian)
poika (Finnish)
pojke (Swedish)

Hvad er norsk for 'girl', så?
Også, er 'å' norsk for at (Danish), att (Swedish), that (English)?

Takk ska du ha. Låt dig være i fred å rette norsk mit.

*I don't know if I was supposed to put 'norsk mit' in that order :S)
PetrWednesday 29th of June 2005 05:04:16 AM
- Hehe Eg sei "kørv" (tenk i forrhold til svensk (hehe)), men det er spesiell ranværing. (Jada av og til gut (lang vokal)).
CharonPluWednesday 29th of June 2005 06:31:57 AM
- girl (English) = pike (Norwegian). en pike/piken/piker/pikene
å (Norwegian) = to (English)
stjerneWednesday 29th of June 2005 01:47:40 PM
- another norwegian word for girl is Jente (feminine gender)

ei jente/jenta/jenter/jentene