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eric151Tuesday 22nd of March 2005 11:25:24 AM
rolling the "r"s - i bought a mic the other day and talked with my friend from norway. he said i sounded chinese because i can't roll my r's.

my first question is: are there any tips for rolling r's?

second question: which r's do you roll? i don't think it's every single one, is there a rule perhaps?

third question: this is unrelated to the first 2, but how do you know when to say "bare" or "god"? i think bare means well and god obviously good but to me they are kind of intertwined... is there a simple explanation or rule for this?




UlvenTuesday 22nd of March 2005 01:05:18 PM
- I also wouldn't mind hearing about some Norwegian pronunciation. I know Swedish pronunciation and Danish.
I regard to the r's in swedish anyhow, you don't roll them before a consonant. eg. bord, barn, orsak. And, in Swedish, an r followed by an s becomes 'sh' (I don't know if Swedes follow it strictly for liason, eg 'flickar ser'. Norwegian is far more similar to swedish pronunciation than to Danish, but I still wouldn't mind hearing of some specific patterns.
stjerneTuesday 22nd of March 2005 01:07:00 PM
- [quote]my first question is: are there any tips for rolling r's?[/quote]

I'm unsure how to start explaining this one...

[quote]second question: which r's do you roll? i don't think it's every single one, is there a rule perhaps?[/quote]

I have been told by my norwegian tutor that you roll every r.

[quote]third question: this is unrelated to the first 2, but how do you know when to say "bare" or "god"? i think bare means well and god obviously good but to me they are kind of intertwined... is there a simple explanation or rule for this?[/quote]

Bare means only, just, merely. One would use it in a reply when someone asks how are you.. you would say bare bra, takk meaning just fine, thanks, or in some other question, sentence that has only, just, merely in it, such as: bare vent - just you wait, den som bare hadde penger - If only one had money

God means good, you use it to say god ettermiddag (good afternoon), god påske (happy Easter) god tur (have a good trip)..and so on.
eric151Wednesday 23rd of March 2005 01:02:39 AM
- oh i meant "bra"! sorry about that! "bra" & "god" yeah. i'll figure it out though.

and every r? wow. that'll take some time. english is so monotone compared to norwegian!!

thanks for the help ;P
stjerneWednesday 23rd of March 2005 05:18:45 AM
- [quote]oh i meant "bra"! [/quote]

velbekomme! :)

Yeah bra means well, good..

some examples would be:

bare bra - just fine
ha det bra - take care of yourself.
det var bra - that's good
å ha det bra - to be fine

Hope this helps :)
sqzSaturday 26th of March 2005 07:58:44 AM
- [quote]Originally posted by DustBunny
I have been told by my norwegian tutor that you roll every r.
[/quote]

well, almost every R.. the R in the words "norsk" and "barn" do not roll, and there are more words I think, just can't remember them right now.
nochnaya vedmaFriday 01st of April 2005 07:39:13 PM
- http://www.travlang.c../../languages

scroll down to find norwegian. there's also this:
http://www.apronus.com/norskaudio/samfunnslaere.htm

my impression of the norwegian i've heard (as well as norwegian accents) is that r's are rolled except in an "ort" combination (so "fortsatt" is something like "fot-shatt" or "fot-shott"), and before an s (when the "rs" becomes "sh", as in "norsk", which sounds like "noshk"). i also hear the r being palatized (softened), especially after e, but unless you know russian (i don't know of any other language that distinguishes between palatized consonants and unpalatized), you probably won't know what that means or how to do it.
SallemanFriday 08th of April 2005 06:04:09 AM
- r's in Norwegian/Swedish mate with the succeeding consonant if that is an l, t, d, n, or s-sound, and form retroflex consonants. The retroflex s would be the sj-sound. For the other consonants, see the right column of this chart:

http://hctv.humnet.ucla.edu/departments/linguistics/VowelsandConsonants/course/chapter1/consonants1.html

Oh, and by the way – a retroflex r would also be referred to as an English r, and does not appear at all in any Scandinavian language. :)

Also note that dialects such as bergensk and skånska, which uses uvular r's, does not display this feature.
PetrFriday 17th of June 2005 12:02:55 AM
- Actually not all Norwegians do roll their R. In Bergen and around (it's spreading) they prononce it much like r in standard Paris French or Duch/Germain. Sorry poor explanaiton, but they don't roll their "r"s propperly.
And by the way the "English" R do exist in certan dialects in the northern parts of Norway. The sound even had its own "rune" in the early futhark

LyddiFriday 17th of June 2005 03:18:54 AM
- Have you found written texts?
I cannot find them.
http://www.apronus.com/norskaudio/samfunnslaere.htm


[quote]Originally posted by nochnaya vedma


http://www.travlang.c../../languages

scroll down to find norwegian. there's also this:
http://www.apronus.com/norskaudio/samfunnslaere.htm

my impression of the norwegian i've heard (as well as norwegian accents) is that r's are rolled except in an "ort" combination (so "fortsatt" is something like "fot-shatt" or "fot-shott"), and before an s (when the "rs" becomes "sh", as in "norsk", which sounds like "noshk"). i also hear the r being palatized (softened), especially after e, but unless you know russian (i don't know of any other language that distinguishes between palatized consonants and unpalatized), you probably won't know what that means or how to do it.[/quote]