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malvaeTuesday 12th of October 2004 11:53:00 PM
Teach Yourself Norwegian - Hei!!!
Jeg er Polsk men jeg snakker litt norsk.Jeg snakker godt
engelsk ogsa darfor jeg har kjopte bokene TEACH YOURSELF NORWEGIAN ! I must admit that this learning kit is very -well constructed and gives all the necessary explanation one needs.The tape that accompanies the book serves as a great pronunciation guide and gives you confidence in listening and understanding spoken norwegian...
but the best of all is the price of this resource because I was able to buy it for not more than $11.87 .
It worked nice for me ,I hope that you'll find it as much interesting as I did!

Hilsen fra Polen!
Ha Det !
Malvae
HisGirlFridayWednesday 13th of October 2004 10:02:48 AM
- I am using the same system as well. I think it works very well and i have progressed very fast on the book and audio as well. There have just been some cases where they through out a word and never really described how to use it properally. For example the word 'om'. The definition was in/about.

The example in the book was in chapter 6: Jeg skal ringe til deg om et par uker. ( I shall call you in a few weeks.)

When i read this, i thought: what about the usage for the word 'about'. I questioned what if, for example, i want to speak to my friend about something going on in October. Could i have said: Jeg vil gjerne snakker med deg om oktober. (I would like to speak to you ABOUT october?)
Or even about the difference between using the words mye and meget.

I just think that the book could spend a little more time seperating the differences between two words that mean the same thing or one word that can me two different things.

But over all, i do recommend this book and it is helpful.
HisGirlFridaySunday 17th of October 2004 09:03:25 AM
!!!!!!!!! - This is what i wrote to my friend in Norway, trying to get some help: it's another example what the book fails to explain.


Okay, i have a grammer thing in Norwegian that i understand what i am looking at but i don't exactly know what the difference is. It's about possessives.

For example what my book gives:

Min tante er tykk-----------( I understand that this is the indefinite form.)

and

Tanten min er tykk-------------( I understand that this is the definite form)

I suppose the only thing I don't understand is, it they both come out to mean "My aunt is fat", how do you know when to either use indefinite or definite form? What's the difference?

Or does tanten min er tykk...is that "the aunt of mine is fat?"

Because the definite singular is suppose to be like bussen, kurset, etc.
The one thing i hate about my text book is that they don't explain these types of things. Stupid book!
Peter fra LAMonday 18th of October 2004 12:46:38 PM
- [quote]The one thing i hate about my text book is that they don't explain these types of things. Stupid book![/quote]

The author of the book Norwegian Verbs And Essentials of Grammar was kind enough to help you out.

Louis:

Just as an aside, what's the difference in English between 'my aunt' and 'the aunt of mine'?


The difference in Norwegian between "min bil" and "bilen min" is partially a matter of style. Both mean "my car".

As a more general answer, the form [possessive + noun in indefinite] tends towards more abstract, while the [noun in definite + [possessive] tends toward more concrete. For example, min kirke would most likely mean 'the institution of my church' while kirken min points towards 'my church building'.

A similar (but not parallel) factor is that family terms usually follow the [noun in definite + [possessive] form -- but that's far from a rule, it's a tendency for oral speech.

Another observation, definitely not a scientific explanation, is that [possessive + noun in indefinite] sounds more historic Danish-influenced. While the other construction [noun in definite + [possessive] sounds more folksy, jordnær -- earthy, Norwegian.

I don't know of any linguistic studies of the differences, but that would make some interesting research! I have a meeting with a native Norwegian speaker this morning, and maybe I'll ask her, but this is the kind of question natives do not have any easy answers to, one or the other form just 'sounds better' depending on tone, style, context.

Med vennlig hilsen

Louis


David writes:

I think it has to do with whether or not your aunt is in the room. If the fat aunt is in the room and you know it, then you would use the indefinite, ³min tanten², especially if she gets angry. Then you can say that you were referring to another fat aunt. If the fat aunt is not in the room, you can not only say ³tanten min er tykk², but you can also say, ³Tanten min, Ingrid, er tykk.² Seriously, with the definite, such as in this case, a name would likely follow the definite to avoid any further ambiguity.
dP

Peter fra LA:

I would suggest the above book as a resource you should consider obtaining. I would also like to stress if you want to have another resource to get answers while we still develop our Norwegian section that you sign up for norskklassen as well -- soon you will be able to help answer the questions of our new members!

Mini Overview of Norsk Pronouns: I

Subject
jeg
Object
meg
Reflexive
meg
Possessive
min, mi, mitt, mine
Reflexive Possessive
Not Applicable

Mini Overview of Norsk Pronoun Usage:

Subject
Jeg bor her.
Object
Erik liker meg.
Reflexive
Jeg vasker meg.
Possessive
Broren min er 16 år.
Reflexive Possessive
Not Applicable

Mini Overview of Possessive Pronouns:
Masculine
pennen min
Feminine
hytta mi
Neuter
huset mitt
Plural
bilene mine

Mini Overview of sin, si, sitt, sine
1. There is a third person subject of the clause
2. The third person subject is the owner of the thing/person in question
3. The thing/person owned is not part of the subject
HisGirlFridayTuesday 19th of October 2004 07:46:03 AM
- [quote]Originally posted by Peter fra LA


David writes:

I think it has to do with whether or not your aunt is in the room. If the fat aunt is in the room and you know it, then you would use the indefinite, ³min tanten², especially if she gets angry. Then you can say that you were referring to another fat aunt. If the fat aunt is not in the room, you can not only say ³tanten min er tykk², but you can also say, ³Tanten min, Ingrid, er tykk.² Seriously, with the definite, such as in this case, a name would likely follow the definite to avoid any further ambiguity.
dP

Peter fra LA:

I would suggest the above book as a resource you should consider obtaining. I would also like to stress if you want to have another resource to get answers while we still develop our Norwegian section that you sign up for norskklassen as well -- soon you will be able to help answer the questions of our new members!

[/quote]

Thank you. That does help alot and explains more than the book. The book just gave examples with out looking at the grammer or situation in depth. Takk!

And i signed up for the Norskklassen. (Norword, or something wasn't it?)But it hasn't helped me yet because i am way over the basics.


Peter fra LATuesday 19th of October 2004 12:05:11 PM
- [quote]And i signed up for the Norskklassen. (Norword, or something wasn't it?)But it hasn't helped me yet because i am way over the basics.[/quote]

Norskklassen is a yahoo group.

Norword you will need to be patient, there are 160 lessons with one sent out per day.
HisGirlFridayTuesday 19th of October 2004 04:15:38 PM
- [quote]Originally posted by Peter fra LA


[quote]And i signed up for the Norskklassen. (Norword, or something wasn't it?)But it hasn't helped me yet because i am way over the basics.[/quote]

Norskklassen is a yahoo group.

Norword you will need to be patient, there are 160 lessons with one sent out per day.[/quote]

Just kidding ^___^ haha...

here's what my friend said:

Okay, i have a grammer thing in Norwegian that i understand what i am looking at but i don't exactly know what the difference is. It's about possessives.

For example what my book gives:

Min tante er tykk-----------( I understand that this is the indefinite form.)

and

Tanten min er tykk-------------( I understand that this is the definite form)

ME: I suppose the only thing I don't understand is, it they both come out to mean "My aunt is fat", how do you know when to either use indefinite or definite form? What's the difference?

MY FRIEND: I think you have to think about where you put min. It's a bit hard for me to explain, for in my dialekt I say Tanten min er tykk about both, I don't use the other form. (Sorry if that confuses you even more...) It's acctually very few that say min tante, it's most old fine east (Oslo) women that say that (Or at least I think so, because I don't hear so many saying it...)

ME: Or does tanten min er tykk...is that "the aunt of mine is fat?"
MY FRIEND: I think that would be the right way of saying it, yes.

ME: Because the definite singular is suppose to be like bussen, kurset, etc.
The one thing i hate about my text book is that they don't explain these types of things. Stupid book!

MY FRIEND: Sorry it took so long, but I had to think about how to explain it, I really don't quite know how to do it now either...


so it seems as if it all depends on where you come from in Norway. I am going to send her what you wrote to me, peter, to try and get to the bottom of this.
HisGirlFridayWednesday 20th of October 2004 02:50:21 PM
- my friend Vanja said that what the situation that the man Dave said would fit also. But like she said, it's not commonly used in her part of Norway ( the west side). She just usaully says 'tanten min'.