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MaryamSunday 15th of August 2004 11:08:34 AM
Most Beautiful - I was wondering... many of you are studying Spanish; but what are the words (or phrases) that you most enjoy pronouncing or hearing?
I remember a Canadian student. She loved to say: "Mañana por la mañana" , she always smiled when I said " Los balcones tienen flores de todos los colores"

It seems that spanish language excerces a kind of fascination to some students who find it very musical.

What are the words or phrases you most like pronouncing? Any reason in particular?
happyturnipSunday 15th of August 2004 12:06:11 PM
- I love mañana por la mañana, too. Also, "muchedumbre" and "paisaje" are fun to say. Bien bien makes everyone sing as it sounds like the song from the BN advert.
surfpantherSunday 15th of August 2004 06:43:35 PM
Musical Spanish - Well, my favorite phrase in spanish is "intente volar" ... excuse the lack of accent marks ... which has nothing to do with its musical qualities! =) My other favorite phrase (for its amazingly cool musical qualities) is "pasamelo" ... it's fun to say really fast!

More on the subject, I've always enjoyed having Spanish teachers who lived in Mexico, becuase there is some odd way that they seem to "sing" the language, with musical inflections and the like. It's interesting how Spanish speakers from different parts of the world will inflect the language differently!
AnyaSunday 15th of August 2004 07:25:51 PM
- I found speaking spanish in Cuba was melodical. It took some getting used to but the mystery of the missing word endings was intriguing.
No recuerdo frasas particulares, pero me gustaba revolver para oir mas!
Maryam, me gusta mucho tu foto.

MaryamTuesday 17th of August 2004 09:37:27 AM
- That's interesting, I have to say that "muchedumbre" sounds special, it's true. "Bien, bien" sounds funny; you guys are making me realize interesting details... Thanks.

[quote]Originally posted by happyturnip


I love mañana por la mañana, too. Also, "muchedumbre" and "paisaje" are fun to say. Bien bien makes everyone sing as it sounds like the song from the BN advert.[/quote]
MaryamTuesday 17th of August 2004 09:39:56 AM
- Hi there Kayguarnay,

By the way, I like your member name, what does it mean?

Thanks for the compliments, I was wondering what language do you want to learn, if any? Gracias por tus palabras, me gustaria saber de donde eres.

Abrazos,

Maryam

[quote]Originally posted by kayguarnay


I found speaking spanish in Cuba was melodical. It took some getting used to but the mystery of the missing word endings was intriguing.
No recuerdo frasas particulares, pero me gustaba revolver para oir mas!
Maryam, me gusta mucho tu foto.
[/quote]
eilla883Tuesday 17th of August 2004 03:31:44 PM
- my favorite words/phrases in spanish are...
bienvenidos
digamelo
equivocadamente
immediamente
quinceañera
spanish is a beautiful, musical language. thank you maryam for helping us to better understand it.
MaryamThursday 19th of August 2004 05:50:11 PM
Thanks Eilla - I am going to write down all words and sentences you people are writing here. And when I have a huge amount... I'll compose a song! :)


[quote]Originally posted by eilla883


my favorite words/phrases in spanish are...
bienvenidos
digamelo
equivocadamente
immediamente
quinceañera
spanish is a beautiful, musical language. thank you maryam for helping us to better understand it. [/quote]
MaryamSunday 22nd of August 2004 04:06:23 PM
Reply to surfpanther - Hi surfpanther,

Pásamelo sounds very musical, yes. Now I want to challenge you: Try to read this

El cielo está enladrillado
¿Quién lo desenladrillará?
El desenladrillador que lo desenladrille
Buen desenladrillador será
(arghhhhhhh!)


[quote]Originally posted by surfpanther


Well, my favorite phrase in spanish is "intente volar" ... excuse the lack of accent marks ... which has nothing to do with its musical qualities! =) My other favorite phrase (for its amazingly cool musical qualities) is "pasamelo" ... it's fun to say really fast!

More on the subject, I've always enjoyed having Spanish teachers who lived in Mexico, becuase there is some odd way that they seem to "sing" the language, with musical inflections and the like. It's interesting how Spanish speakers from different parts of the world will inflect the language differently![/quote]
zarkannTuesday 31st of August 2004 12:16:30 PM
- bahh.. i don't know anything in Spanish :( so i don't know wich word i prefer.. but i can say something.. i like spanish, how it sounds to the ear.. it's a latin language like french, but for us in french is not the same.. French is not a musical sound.

Personally, i think that Spanish is the most beautiful language after Japanese :D

[quote]El cielo está enladrillado
¿Quién lo desenladrillará?
El desenladrillador que lo desenladrille
Buen desenladrillador será
(arghhhhhhh!)
[/quote]

What that this mean ? :) it's verbs ?
ZelleThursday 02nd of September 2004 04:41:08 AM
segunda mano - Es que appredo hablar español a mi casa nueva, y me gustan muchos los frases y las expresiónes que yo oigo en la calle todo los dias, como: "qué precioso; qué lujo; qué rico; qué bien..." Tambien me gusta "todo la vida" o "todo de Madrid" a dice toda cosa todo tiempo.
MaryamThursday 02nd of September 2004 08:27:01 AM
To Zarkann - Well... Guess what?

French is my favorite language. And to me it's very special and full of shades: one can explain almost any kind of feelings because it is very rich in ways of expressing emotions. Spanish is very rich too, and I like it of course. Sounds more musical too as you say.
I am sure you will make it:)

I will also try to add more musical links to the discuss.
Take care
[quote]Originally posted by zarkann


bahh.. i don't know anything in Spanish :( so i don't know wich word i prefer.. but i can say something.. i like spanish, how it sounds to the ear.. it's a latin language like french, but for us in french is not the same.. French is not a musical sound.

Personally, i think that Spanish is the most beautiful language after Japanese :D

[quote]El cielo está enladrillado
¿Quién lo desenladrillará?
El desenladrillador que lo desenladrille
Buen desenladrillador será
(arghhhhhhh!)
[/quote]

What that this mean ? :) it's verbs ?[/quote]
MaryamThursday 02nd of September 2004 08:30:15 AM
- Hello Zelle,

I will help you as you asked on your email.

Me gusta la expresión ¡Que maravilla! and ¡Ay, que risa!

Maryam

[quote]Originally posted by Zelle


Es que appredo hablar español a mi casa nueva, y me gustan muchos los frases y las expresiónes que yo oigo en la calle todo los dias, como: "qué precioso; qué lujo; qué rico; qué bien..." Tambien me gusta "todo la vida" o "todo de Madrid" a dice toda cosa todo tiempo. [/quote]
zarkannThursday 02nd of September 2004 09:32:28 AM
- [quote]Well... Guess what?

French is my favorite language. And to me it's very special and full of shades: one can explain almost any kind of feelings because it is very rich in ways of expressing emotions. Spanish is very rich too, and I like it of course. Sounds more musical too as you say.
I am sure you will make it

I will also try to add more musical links to the discuss.
[/quote]

Of course, you can express basically all emotions in French language.. I don't know if spanish can have as many expression as we have in French to show our emotions, but i want to know :P i'll do all my best to learn Spanish !

and i know the perfect discuss to practice it :P

Voilà, c'est décidé :P


drumingbeetThursday 02nd of September 2004 10:06:09 AM
- A mi me gusta "Qué maravilloso!" tambien, porqué esta como un reir en un sonrisa.

*por favor, corregir.
MaryamThursday 02nd of September 2004 10:16:19 AM
- A mi me gusta "¡Qué maravilloso!" también, porque es como reír en una sonrisa.

Please note:

Es = permanent situation
Estar = non permanent situation

For example
Antonio es guapo. Means he was born with these features or they make part of him naturally

but

Antonio está guapo or Antonio está guapo hoy means he did something to look handsome. Maybe he is feeling good today or maybe he put nice clothes etc.

Este papel es amarillo (natural color or natural from factory)
Este papel esta amarillo (it has become this color through time but it was not like this before)

La casa esta triste (something happened there that it looks sad)
La casa es triste (it has always been a sad house)

Hope it helps .

Maryam


[quote]Originally posted by drumingbeet


A mi me gusta "Qué maravilloso!" tambien, porqué esta como un reir en un sonrisa.

*por favor, corregir.[/quote]
ZelleFriday 03rd of September 2004 02:33:13 AM
estar/ser - Es hermoso en la lengua español que el adjetivo 'muerta/muerto' es considerado temporal: mi amiga esta muerta... ella es en mi corazón siempre y tocará ésta vida.
mohamed_am83Friday 03rd of September 2004 07:47:59 AM
Rie de moscas - hi,
in Mexico, there's a legend about a man that had upnormal capabilities to control mosquitos, the legend says that he was always followd by a great cloud of mosquitos.
The legend says more details about this man which are not very pleasing, but what is important is that mexicans called that man "Rie de moscas" which means king of mosquitos , i find this phrase lovely regardless the legend :)
regards
MaryamSaturday 04th of September 2004 09:30:48 AM
- Yes, Zelle , very beautiful and insigthful thoughts can come up just with what you say here. For us who speak many times without thinking, we are very grateful when someone makes us stop and think realize "¡qué bonita es nuestra lengua!"

[quote]Originally posted by Zelle


Es hermoso en la lengua español que el adjetivo 'muerta/muerto' es considerado temporal: mi amiga esta muerta... ella es en mi corazón siempre y tocará ésta vida. [/quote]
MaryamSaturday 04th of September 2004 09:36:41 AM
To Marlo - Hello there Marlo!

I can tell you that we also have a legend in Spain about these kind of insects but this time it was Saint Narcisse who saved the napoleonian guard that had been victim of a plague of blue and terrible flies, so "el rey de las moscas" this time was a dead man who had been canonized as Saint...
[quote]Originally posted by mohamed_am83


hi,
in Mexico, there's a legend about a man that had upnormal capabilities to control mosquitos, the legend says that he was always followd by a great cloud of mosquitos.
The legend says more details about this man which are not very pleasing, but what is important is that mexicans called that man "Rie de moscas" which means king of mosquitos , i find this phrase lovely regardless the legend :)
regards[/quote]
pepperlandWednesday 08th of September 2004 07:27:51 AM
Maryam I got a nice one for you - Hola Maryam!I got a nice saying for you,it´s something we are taught at school here to learn how to pronounce english properly,see if you can translate this into spanish and post a reply!!
"The rain in Spain stays mainly in the plains"
Try to say it very fast,it´s like a tongue twister....
pepperlandWednesday 08th of September 2004 07:30:59 AM
if I were to pick a nice saying in spanish... - I would have to say that the words "tuercebotas" and "muerdeesquinas" really do my head in.Also "saltacunas" and "papanatas" crack me up quite a lot!!!!
pepperlandWednesday 08th of September 2004 07:33:06 AM
I forgot to mention one more word! - There´s a figure in the Burgos Cathedral they like to call "Papamoscas" I wonder where it got that name from and what it really means to be a "papamoscas"....anyone??
PrincessAmy618Thursday 09th of September 2004 07:18:52 PM
Espanol! - My favorite phrase in Spanish is "vaya con Dios." I dunno why, it just has such a sense of everything you want to say when someone you love is going for a long journey.
MaryamSaturday 11th of September 2004 06:29:03 AM
Re: Pepperland - Hi there! I have heard of this saying, that´s funny! It´s translation as you know is "la lluvia en España se queda sobretodo en el llano". Here "plain" can have different synonyms:
"llano", "llanura", "planicie" or even "páramo".
Thanks for your contribution.

Maryam.
[quote]Originally posted by pepperland


Hola Maryam!I got a nice saying for you,it´s something we are taught at school here to learn how to pronounce english properly,see if you can translate this into spanish and post a reply!!
"The rain in Spain stays mainly in the plains"
Try to say it very fast,it´s like a tongue twister....[/quote]
MaryamSaturday 11th of September 2004 06:32:55 AM
Re: If I were to pick a nice saying in Spanish... - These words are rarely used in common spoken Spanish. But "papanatas" is very used in daily life. It´s a very old word indeed, meaning "simple person, simpleton". For example, someone who is discussing an issue that is completely irrelevant in a certain situation will be a "papanatas" because he is acting folishly and with absurdity, and people make fun of him-her.

Thanks,

Maryam
[quote]Originally posted by pepperland


I would have to say that the words "tuercebotas" and "muerdeesquinas" really do my head in.Also "saltacunas" and "papanatas" crack me up quite a lot!!!![/quote]
MaryamSaturday 11th of September 2004 06:44:36 AM
Re: I forgot to mention one word! - Precisely, "papamoscas" has the same meaning than "papanatas" but it also describes a little bird that can be easily tammed and people use it to clean the rooms from flies. I have personally never seen this kind of bird and I am sure it´s very well known in the countryside. About its meaning regarding the Cathedral in Burgos, if you recalled, there is a figure on its dome, it´s a curious boy doll created in the 16th century that opens its mouth every time that the bells strike.

Hope this helps .

Maryam
[quote]Originally posted by pepperland


There´s a figure in the Burgos Cathedral they like to call "Papamoscas" I wonder where it got that name from and what it really means to be a "papamoscas"....anyone??[/quote]
MaryamSaturday 11th of September 2004 06:50:06 AM
To PrincessAmy -
Hello Princess,
This is true, but this expression is very typical from Latin american countries. In Spain we don´t use this expression, possibly in the south of Spain yes, and other interior areas of the country. It sounds more like Mexican. And we know that Mexico is a country with very deep feelings of faith. Not that we don´t use religious expressions in Spain :)

That would be good to know how hispanic countries express this concern whenever someone dear leaves for a long trip.
In Spain we say : Buen viaje, simply. And sometimes "que Dios te acompañe".

Maryam
[quote]Originally posted by PrincessAmy618


My favorite phrase in Spanish is "vaya con Dios." I dunno why, it just has such a sense of everything you want to say when someone you love is going for a long journey.[/quote]
Peter fra LAMonday 13th of September 2004 01:37:02 PM
The rain in Spain - [quote]Originally posted by pepperland
"The rain in Spain stays mainly in the plains"
Try to say it very fast,it´s like a tongue twister....[/quote]

Hola pepperland!

I always hated this phrase the most "Sally sells sea shells by the sea shore."

Give that phrase a few repeats at a fast speed and see how your mouth feels when you are done.
Panama_redTuesday 14th of September 2004 09:31:19 AM
Quisiera Colaborar!! - Hey..i was reading all the messages and is cool that u think that spanish is a cool language.,..well spanish is my native language, and in fact i think its a little difficult, u know for the accents and that things...im just learning english..hey and is very cool to learn it..well hope some one can help me with my english and i can help with spanish..:)...Hey Maryam, me alegra que haya gente como tu que ayde a difundir lo bonito del español..ahh por cierto eres muy linda..;) ;)..adios y cuidense mucho...
SverrianWednesday 15th of September 2004 04:55:10 PM
Favorite phrases - My favorite is
Chuchaqui(it's an Ecuadorian idiomatic expression meaning hangover


DouglasUSAThursday 16th of September 2004 04:05:20 AM
Favorite Spanish Phrase - Yo espejo verte pronto y sus ojos aparece las estrellas en el cielo del noche.
MaryamFriday 17th of September 2004 08:00:07 AM
Thanks - Hi everyone!

I must say "thanks A LOT for your collaboration and words that improve Spanish knowledge. As you see, Spanish is a very rich language especially for the variety of words and expressions coming from different countries all over the world. Thanks for the ecuatorian word, I didn't know it. And the poetic -although mispelled sentence-by Douglas.
I think you wanted to say "yo espero verte pronto" and "tus ojos son como las estrellas que aparecen en el cielo de la noche"...?

Please keep in mind that it's better that you resize your avatars when they are too big. It will make the pages look better.
Keep on thinking what words and expressions you like most.
Here is something I like. Try reading it and discover how beautiful the words sound.

Pegasos, lindos pegasos,
caballitos de madera.
Yo conocí siendo niño
la alegría de dar vueltas
sobre un corcel colorado
en una noche de fiesta.

En el aire polvoriento
chispeaban las candelas
y la noche azul ardía,
¡toda sembrada de estrellas!

Alegrías infantiles
que cuestan una mondeda
de cobre.
Lindos pegasos,
¡caballitos de madera!.

Antonio Machado.
Sevilla, 1875- Colliure, France, 1939




HayleyTuesday 21st of September 2004 12:47:48 AM
- Well those sayings are all really beautiful. One I like is really silly....it's "Hay siempre nubes en el cielo" which just means there are always clouds in the sky! I just like the way it sounds....does anyone know how I could make it make sense, for example, by saying at the ending "pero ten cuidado con la plata" ? I'm trying to say something about looking out for the silver. Can anyone help?
MaryamFriday 24th of September 2004 04:41:54 PM
RE; Hayley4orli - Perhaps it would be suitable "Siempre hay nubes en el cielo... pero ten cuidado con la tempestad" if you mean by this that one must be careful and not take all things for granted.

If not, then try to give further explanations?
Thanks,

[quote]Originally posted by hayley4orli


Well those sayings are all really beautiful. One I like is really silly....it's "Hay siempre nubes en el cielo" which just means there are always clouds in the sky! I just like the way it sounds....does anyone know how I could make it make sense, for example, by saying at the ending "pero ten cuidado con la plata" ? I'm trying to say something about looking out for the silver. Can anyone help?[/quote]
HayleyWednesday 29th of September 2004 01:43:36 AM
- Thanks heaps Maryam! That was exactly what I was trying to say. Do you know how you could also say that "every cloud has a silver lining" ?
Would it be: "Todo los nubes tiene un forro de plata" or am I wrong??
MaryamWednesday 29th of September 2004 08:40:27 AM
Reply to Hayley4orli - Hello Hayley,

This would be the "literal translation", but without much sense in Spanish. Because as you know this means that from all the problems there is always some good coming up. In this sense, I could use a spanish proverb that is quite close with this idea:

"No hay mal que por bien no venga"(There's no bad that something good doesn't come from it) - Every cloud has a silver lining would then be the English translation more or less. Or... There's no evil that does not bring some good. Probably it is also correct.
And as for a cultural tip... When Carrero Blanco (General Franco´s secretary) was killed by ETA back in the 70´s, Franco made this sentence famous when he said after his death: No hay mal que por bien no venga.




[quote]Originally posted by hayley4orli


Thanks heaps Maryam! That was exactly what I was trying to say. Do you know how you could also say that "every cloud has a silver lining" ?
Would it be: "Todo los nubes tiene un forro de plata" or am I wrong?? [/quote]
HayleyMonday 04th of October 2004 08:37:41 PM
- Gracias Maryam :):)
KeynFriday 08th of October 2004 09:05:12 AM
My favorite Spanish phrase - Yo solo tengo cinco classes y necesito tomar seis.

That's it! Pretty exciting huh?
MaryamSunday 10th of October 2004 09:19:35 AM
- Hi there Keyn,

I guess it's because of the many "s" ?

Then try to say this : Las casas típicas catalanas


tasya-la-poliglotaSaturday 16th of October 2004 03:21:52 PM
las palabras españolas que me gustan -
....seran las palabras

"madrugada"
"serenidad"
"afortunadamente"

....pues, por ninguna razon...solo prefiero estas porque me gusta mucho la manera de pronunciarlas...:D

MaryamSunday 17th of October 2004 10:08:13 AM
- Son bonitas... y poéticas también. Gracias Tasya.
alequin0923Tuesday 19th of October 2004 02:07:44 PM
éstas son mis palabras españolas preferidas - hispanohablante...
te amo...
corazon...
cuidado...
hola!...

aleq
lightfoot27Tuesday 19th of October 2004 02:59:24 PM
Most fun word - The most fun word to say in Spanish has to be guagua, which is spanish for bus, however it is only used in the Carribean.
MaryamTuesday 19th of October 2004 03:16:33 PM
- the spanish equivalent for "guagua" is "autobús".
Etymologycally speaking, "guagua" could be a deformation of the english word "wagon" .But guagua (literally "wawa" is a quechua word meaning "little child" and it is used in Ecuador and the Andean mountains.


[quote]Originally posted by lightfoot27


The most fun word to say in Spanish has to be guagua, which is spanish for bus, however it is only used in the Carribean.[/quote]
surfpantherThursday 21st of October 2004 06:30:48 PM
- I found another good musical phrase (just learned it in spanish class yesterday!):

le da el mal de ojo

I like it because the words seem to blend together and it's difficult for me to understand unless I'm really paying attention and somewhat expect it. Another phrase that I love to say is "preocuparse por" because of the way it forces your mouth to shape around the words, which is so much different than English ... !!! Honestly, if you compare the English way of saying the same word (pree-ock-you-par) to the Spanish pronunciation (pray-oh-coo-par) ... I much prefer the way Spanish shapes your lips around the word.
MaryamThursday 21st of October 2004 06:52:05 PM
Surfpanther - Well ... mal de ojo is something that can be arranged putting "un poco de sal debajo de la alfombra", as people say here:)

About "preocuparse", you seem the kind of student that likes difficult words for the pleasure to learn their pronounciation no matter how many tries it costs... and that is beautiful. Maybe you would like to pronounce "empecinarse" or the name "Jorge". You know, I am going to post soon a list of difficult-to-pronounce words for those who like what is difficult (what is the most beautiul as well).

Take care,

Maryam
AnyaSunday 24th of October 2004 11:39:44 PM
- The more I think about this topic, the more I realize how much I love the way subject and verb (sometimes object too) can be put together in Spanish:
Muestramelo (show it to me)
Dígame, por favor (tell me, please)
Sentémonos (Let's sit down)
Abrazame, si quieres (hug me)

They are commands, but I feel like they are softened by 'por favor' or other modifiers.

Makes me wonder if it's possible to go overboard in using this construction when talking?!
(I do know that it's an artifact of learning with my wonderful high school teacher who was fond of subjuntivo :))
JamesBondurant_USAMonday 25th of October 2004 03:02:10 PM
- Anaranjado is my favorite spanish word. I think it is fun to say, it's very rhythmic.
MaryamWednesday 27th of October 2004 07:59:15 PM
James - ... And that's true; a canadian student I had used to say the same. She liked also the word encarnado (flesh coloured). Anaranjado sounds more musical though.
ZelleMonday 01st of November 2004 04:01:25 AM
dia de los muertos/ dia de todos los santos - Hola amigos. Hoy es el Dia de los Muertos, Dia de Todos los Santos...

Today is known as Day of the Dead, or All Saints Day to much of the world.

¿Qué haces para la celebración? Here in Madrid, I have created a table to honour and invite the spirit of my old dog, who died a year and a half ago. Usually, people who celebrate this time use today to create such a display, in order to welcome the spirits of friends, relatives or animals back for the whole month. This is beautiful. Abrazos - Zelle
ticoWednesday 03rd of November 2004 12:43:06 PM
- It may sound corny but I like the way "I love you" sounds in spanish ... te quiero

I also have a friend from Uruguay that always says "es asi .. pero no debe ser asi" and I've gotten used to saying that or just simply "es asi" from time to time
maryamWednesday 03rd of November 2004 06:22:20 PM
- Hi Tico,

Well this is an expression many foreigners like saying in Spanish! And it's funny when some say "te quero" instead of "te quiero".
As for "es así", it sounds quite musical as well. My big hugs go to Nassau, where I spent some time and enjoyed the people and ... the conch fritters as well!

Maryam

[quote]Originally posted by tico


It may sound corny but I like the way "I love you" sounds in spanish ... te quiero

I also have a friend from Uruguay that always says "es asi .. pero no debe ser asi" and I've gotten used to saying that or just simply "es asi" from time to time[/quote]
LL12Monday 08th of November 2004 06:09:27 PM
- Well i used to love to say 'creo que esta roto' - at the wrong times, however i now love to say 'vamos aver' (i know... a definite flaw in spelling) sounds very rhythmic I think.
JamesBondurant_USAThursday 11th of November 2004 01:30:25 PM
- Yo tengo una palabra favorito nueva, trabajaba. Es tan cómico cuando yo hablo.
MaryamSaturday 13th of November 2004 04:48:17 PM
- ¿...Y por qué es cómico, James :)??

[quote]Originally posted by JamesBondurant_USA


Yo tengo una palabra favorito nueva, trabajaba. Es tan cómico cuando yo hablo.[/quote]
MaryamWednesday 17th of November 2004 10:26:24 AM
- Me gusta cómo suena la palabra "arquitectónico"
También "emblemático" y "extremadamente"...
tinkerbTuesday 30th of November 2004 04:58:02 PM
-

¡Trabajaba es una palabra favorita mía también!

No sé cómo explicarlo...hay una expresión en inglés que dice "roll of the tongue." Por decirlo casí hay una sensación de bailar que me hace pensar en "Alf Layla wa Layla."

Además es parte del imperfecto que es algo que me gusta mucho enseñar.
MaryamFriday 03rd of December 2004 10:28:15 AM
- Me gustan las palabras

cantarín
cantarina
malabarista
emprendedor
caminante

Y...
tres tristes tigres comen trigo en un trigal :)!

RickRaeMonday 20th of December 2004 07:24:31 AM
Credit Cards! (No, - Hello, all.

I've only been self-studying Spanish for a few weeks now, so I haven't much to contribute (other than many questions and lots of confusion). But I'll throw in my dos pesos (I'm studying Latin American Spanish, else I'd say pesetas...)

I find a lot of Spanish words and phrases beautiful to listen to, but during my studies I've found one phrase that is fun to say (at least to me): Una tarjeta de crédito. There is something about the rhythm of my tongue hitting the roof of my mouth, or similar. This is one of the phrases I can roll off very quickly... and it feels quite comfortable and natural doing so (which is a novelty so far!)

Also fun is the opening "ah-ow" sound of "autobús," which coincidentally was mentioned earlier in the thread.

[quote]Originally posted by Maryam

Please note:

Es = permanent situation
Estar = non permanent situation
[/quote]

As I told my wife (who is also trying to self-study Spanish) after I realized I had made an earlier soy/estoy error: Soy corto e estoy alto, pero soy no alto.

Which may be horrid Spanish, but the point was: I am short... permanently. I am (temporarily) tall when I wear my "tall shoes" (platforms), but my state of being is not tall and never will be.

It was a very pleasing (if small) victory when I finally understood the distinction between soy and estoy. :) And the little exercise of talking about being temporarily tall in certain shoes has helped cement the difference.

More than enough rambling from me. Thanks Maryam (and all) for the wonderful resources here.

Regards,
Rick


MaryamMonday 20th of December 2004 10:55:16 AM
Rick - All right Rick, very interesting remarks. I will point out here that 'short' when related to people is 'bajo, or baja' and you can use the term "corto de estatura" with the same sense of 'short' as in English. There you can say either "soy corto de estatura" or "soy bajo de estatura"
But if you only say "i'm short" it becomes "soy bajo" in Spanish. Corto de mentalidad (narrow minded), este chico es un corto (too shy), soy corto de vista (difficult sight), etc.

Una mesa baja, un lápiz corto (short dimension) un lápiz largo (long dimensions)
But: un arbol alto (extended, high, tall)
¨
So: corto-largo (horizontal sense, most of times)
and: alto - bajo (vertical sense)

RickRaeMonday 20th of December 2004 01:19:34 PM
- Maryam,

As I mentioned, I've only been studying for two or three weeks, so most of it's still "magic" to me. :) Thanks for the input and the corrections... every little bit helps.

Thanks also for not mentioning my gender error in saying "El tarjeta..." I realized that slip a bit ago and corrected it to "Una tarjeta..." (Yes, I do know "el" is he/it masculine (versus "la") and "una" is "a" feminine (versus "un")... it was "Una tarjeta de crédito" that had the wonderful cadence for me. I have no idea where the "El" came from when I posted earlier!)

¡Muchas gracias por la ayuda! (I hope I got that right...)

Rick
MaryamThursday 23rd of December 2004 09:31:37 PM
- It´s ok Rick, I´m glad you remarked it. Eres perfeccionista. This will lead you far in Spanish, you´ll see.:)

RickRaeFriday 24th of December 2004 08:21:56 AM
- [quote]Originally posted by Maryam
Eres perfeccionista.[/quote]
Suspiro... sí, lo admito... ¡para mejor o para peor! :(