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ArteumMonday 17th of January 2005 09:02:50 AM
IF-expressions in Swedish - Hello, my Swedish-speaking freinds :-)

My Swedish textboook does not particularly expand on the usage of different if-expressions in Swedish, and I'd like to learn these expressions.

There are four main types of expressions which I would like somebody to translate into Swedish:

1) "If you drive me I will attend the party."
2) "If you drove me I would attend the party."
3) "If you had driven me I would have attended the party."
4) "If you have driven me here, you have to drive me back."

Does Swedish have any other usages of "IF" which are absent in English?

Thank you.

Arteum


HoogardMonday 17th of January 2005 08:23:36 PM
- Ok, I'll make a try. The Phrases within ( ) are what i would have used instead of the literal translation.

1) "If you drive me I will attend the party."
Om du kör mig (om jag får skjuts) så kommer jag att närvara vid festen (så kommer jag på festen)

2) "If you drove me I would attend the party."
Om du körde mig (om jag fick skuts) så skulle jag närvara vid festen (så skulle jag komma på festen)

3) "If you had driven me I would have attended the party."
Om du hade kört mig (om jag hade fått skjuts) så skulle jag närvarat vid festen (så skulle jag kommit på festen)

4) "If you have driven me here, you have to drive me back."
Om du (+nu) har kört mig hit så får du (+även) köra mig tillbaks.
Ps. the (+ ) was just to make it sound better)



"Does Swedish have any other usages of "IF" which are absent in English?"

Yes. The swedish word for If, "om", is also used in situations like.

Det är mörkt om natten (it is dark during the night)
meaning: sort of like during

Det doftar om maten (the food smells (not bad, often good^^))
meaning: sort of like "from". but it's more like an attribute you assign to the food in this case.

if think many of these cases can be from the swedish word "omkring" which means around.
eg
Hålla om någon (to hold/hug somebody)

There are probobly more ways you can use "om".
Note that in all these special cases you are not forced to use "om". You could easily use another word instead.
eg.
Det är mörkt på natten (it is dark in the night. almost the same thing)

If you have more questions or I just didn't make any sense at all, please let me know =)
ArteumTuesday 18th of January 2005 02:39:08 AM
- Hoogard, thank you, that is a great help!

It's even more than I asked!
HoogardTuesday 18th of January 2005 05:51:36 AM
- no problem. just hit me with new questions =)
JadokesaTuesday 18th of January 2005 11:06:39 PM
- The word "om" does also begin subordinate interrogative clauses, like "if":

Regnar det?
Is it raining?

Han undrar om det regnar.
He wonders if it is raining.
HoogardWednesday 19th of January 2005 01:24:09 AM
- [quote]Originally posted by Jadokesa
The word "om" does also begin subordinate interrogative clauses, like "if":

Regnar det?
Is it raining?

Han undrar om det regnar.
He wonders if it is raining.[/quote]

I don't get this really. is there any diffirence in the "if" here and the "if" in the earlier cases? You seem to know more about languages than I do =)
JadokesaWednesday 19th of January 2005 01:38:05 AM
- Haha. There's no real difference, but it is another case when you use "om". Subordinate interrogative clauses are different from usual interrogative clauses in some languages, so it is good to know. I didn't know it at the top of my head, but I checked in Svenska Akademiens Språklära for other uses of "om".

Om du kommer på någon bättre översättning av "frågebisats" än "subordinate interrogative clause", berätta :p
HoogardWednesday 19th of January 2005 02:40:06 AM
- jag har faktiskt ingen aning =)
Thursday 20th of January 2005 05:21:12 PM
- Arteum points out (in another thread) that when 'om' is used in those sentences, 'så' starts the next clause in all of them. Are there any other words besides 'så' that would be just as appropriate? If there isn't, it makes it quite easy. No confusion.
Thursday 20th of January 2005 05:22:19 PM
- Arteum points out (in another thread) that when 'om' is used in those sentences, 'så' starts the next clause in all of them. Are there any other words besides 'så' that would be just as appropriate? If there isn't, it makes it quite easy. No confusion.
Is 'så' or its equivalent evr omitted?
Thursday 20th of January 2005 05:23:02 PM
- Arteum points out (in another thread) that when 'om' is used in those sentences, 'så' starts the next clause in all of them. Are there any other words besides 'så' that would be just as appropriate? If there isn't, it makes it quite easy. No confusion.
Is 'så' or its equivalent ever omitted?
JadokesaThursday 20th of January 2005 07:50:26 PM
- The sentence is a bit wrong. A good translation of "I've been thinking about you" would be "Jag har tänkt på dig". "Jag har tyckt om dig" is "I've liked you", and gives the impression of that you liked the person you speak to, but you don't anymore.

"Tycka" is always used together with "om" when you say "I like" (jag tycker om). "Tycka till" is more like "to sound your opinion". I can't find a translation of it in my dictionary, so I daren't give an example.

It isn't my signature, it was a message to Hoogard :)
I don't think that my message is totally correct at grammar, but it is the form I prefer. Let's take a sentence like:

Om du kommer på något bättre, så berätta!

As you said, it is a bit of dramatic - if I say it aloud, I make a pause between "bättre" and "berätta", and therefore I often skip the "så". If I say it fast, I don't (it feels un-natural). If I would say it more "friendly" and non-dramatic, it would be:

Om du kommer på något bättre så får du gärna berätta för mig.

I'm a bit dramatic when I speak :)
I have to go now, but when I come home I'll check in my book and see if it has an explaination.
UlvenSaturday 22nd of January 2005 12:29:35 PM
- For the simply straight forward comment "I like it", would you need the om; "Jag tycker om det". Becuase I'd have omitted it and just said "Jag tycker det". Are their really any strict rules about when tycka means like and when it means just think, or is is just context and common sense.
Because in English, 'think' and 'like' can put across a huge mixed messages. Though, one would never say "I think you". They'd have "I think about you". Maybe it's the same in Swedish. Does 'tycka' generally not cause any ambiguity?
JadokesaSaturday 22nd of January 2005 05:12:30 PM
- Yes, you need the 'om'; "Jag tycker det" simply means "I think so" and not "I like it". In general, "tycka om" is like and "tycka" is think (keep in mind that "tänka" also is think - but in a different context).

I think about you is "Jag tänker på dig".
teknogeekTuesday 01st of February 2005 07:40:15 AM
- This information may be beneficial in the Swedish Study Group too! Would any of you like to post this as a lesson there?
JadokesaTuesday 01st of February 2005 09:41:52 PM
- I think this is too advanced of a topic, yet. But later on, when you have advanced, it might be a good lesson. I'll see if I've got the motivation to make it a lesson later :)