All Languages How Do You Say "honey" In Your Language?

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jinyi
Saturday 26th of November 2005 09:52:14 PM
How do you say "honey" in your language?: Maybe "honey" would be one of the most sweetest words in the world, especially while being used between couples.
I really would like to know how do you say it in different countries. : )

ok, Here we go!

In Mandarin, its "Tian Xin"or "Bao Bei".
In Korean, its "Jagiya".

... ...





ladysmyrna
Saturday 26th of November 2005 09:55:51 PM
See now I want to eat honey :D

In Turkish honey is "bal" but when you say honey referring to your partner it's "balım." :)




Mery
Saturday 26th of November 2005 10:20:16 PM
In French honey = 'le miel', but you can't call someone 'miel' :D


Mathieu
Saturday 26th of November 2005 10:34:47 PM
"honing" in Dutch.. but again, to call anyone that would be.. offensive, if anything at all :p To refer to someone there's "schat(je)" though that sounds rather common/superficial/sarcastic.. beter forget about it alltogether ;)


joziboy
Saturday 26th of November 2005 10:59:29 PM
Originally posted by Teup


"honing" in Dutch.. but again, to call anyone that would be.. offensive, if anything at all :p To refer to someone there's "schat(je)" though that sounds rather common/superficial/sarcastic.. beter forget about it alltogether ;)

Haha, really? :) In SA both Afrikaners and English-speaking South Africans use Skattie to mean 'mate/pal'. Although I suppose it can be a cute word for someone you like...

Zulu: Honey = uju


Mathieu
Saturday 26th of November 2005 11:09:02 PM
Hehe that's funny, yeah, "schatje" really refers to a loved one, but it's degrading IMO, I'd never use it :D seems the Afrikaans word is alot nicer :) It comes from "schat" by the way, which is "treasure" (which to you is no surprise since "skat" is also treasure in Afrikaans :)).


jinyi
Saturday 26th of November 2005 11:15:52 PM
honey=treasure?
hehe, it sounds really cute!
anyway, the one u call him/her as honey must be someone special to u.. kinda treasure to u:)


Osman
Saturday 26th of November 2005 11:17:10 PM


there is a word in German quite similar to "Schatje".

it was Schatze i think. they also use "meine liebe" to express the similar emotion. ;)

two days ago i had asked a Dutch native speaker about Schatje. He, that dutch journalist, did know Turkish too. pronounciation of Schatje is cool!! :)

you need to get a voice like "r" of "Merci" in French. well i hope i am not wrong :)

in Turkish we also use "tatlım" which also means "sweety".


Mathieu
Saturday 26th of November 2005 11:36:38 PM
jinyi, what do the Korean and Mandarin ones mean literally, if anything? I suppose it doesn't mean "honey" as in that sweet yellow sticky stuff?

Hmm the French 'r' for the Dutch 'g''ch' is one way of interpreting it, I hear a clear difference, but it all depends on your point of view, everone interprets every language differently :) It's actually more in the front of the mouth, like a very sloppy 'k', but the French 'r' is rather close, I think you could get away with it :D


Anya
Sunday 27th of November 2005 12:04:31 AM
In Russian, Мёд (myod) = honey, but just like in French, you really can't call someone that, you'll be misunderstood.

From your question, though, I think you are looking for terms of endearment, which there are TONS and TONS in Russian. They are invented every single day.

The closest one in usage to 'honey' is probably cолнышко (solnyshko) = sunshine.



Jos_
Sunday 27th of November 2005 01:12:01 AM
honey in portuguese: In portuguese it is said: mel


Agnese
Sunday 27th of November 2005 02:11:58 AM
honey?: in latvian the sweet thing you eat is called "medus"
to person...we usually say darling (dārgais) or 'the one whom I love'- mīļais (may be difficult to show pronouncation)


Dolores
Sunday 27th of November 2005 04:12:33 AM
hi,

in Sebian 'honey' - the substance ;) is called ‘med'

- and if you’d like to address someone with an adjective derived from the word ‘honey’ -> ‘meden’ (m), medena (f), that would usually be a baby or a small child, and the real meaning of ‘medena’ would be ‘so cute’ :)


Panos
Sunday 27th of November 2005 05:33:31 AM
hi,
in Greek it is μέλι - meli - the substance (looks like the portuguese ), but not used to call someone like that. But an adjective can be derived from that, 'μελένιος' - 'melenios'. In fact that was the name in Greek for one of the Smurfs (the one that was very narcissist:).
In Greek it is used 'γλυκιέ μου' - 'glikie mu' (for male ), 'γλυκιά μου' - 'glikia mu' (for female ), meaning 'sweetie'.


jinyi
Sunday 27th of November 2005 10:42:58 AM
yeah..the substance called in both Mandarin and Korean sound not that sweet: P
In Mandar: 蜂蜜(feng mi)
In Korean: 벌꿀(baol ggul)



Dawnlorraine
Sunday 27th of November 2005 01:19:39 PM
In Tagalog the word honey (the one from honeybee) is pulot-pukyutan; honeymoon is pulot-gata but you cannot call a loved one pulot-pukyutan:p although the term of endearment mahal which means "beloved" or "love" is often used.


Ana_Drobot
Sunday 27th of November 2005 05:35:49 PM
"Miere" in Romanian, but you can't call someone that. Intead you may use "dulceata" ('sweetie') or simply "dragul meu" (my dear/ masc) - "draga mea" (my dear - fem).


kea
Monday 28th of November 2005 10:42:17 PM
in Estonian: honey = mesi
and we do not call people with that word :p


leobloom
Tuesday 29th of November 2005 02:47:00 AM
In italian miele= honey but we usually say dolcezza (a bit rough though...) = sweetness when referring to people...


majoka
Tuesday 29th of November 2005 04:16:18 AM
In Polish 'honey'=kochanie(I know that my dutch friends write this word as 'kochanje';)).


gzqgzq
Tuesday 29th of November 2005 10:53:59 AM
in chinese
honey have so much means,
it can means sweet food named honey ,we always say:feng mi.
and it can means sweet girl or deer,we always say:qing ai de!


austriae
Tuesday 29th of November 2005 09:42:16 PM
In German we call our honey "Schatz"
The honey from the bees is called "Honig"

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