All Languages Same Words Different Meanings Between Various Languages

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jeff
Friday 13th of August 2004 08:46:43 PM
Same Words Different Meanings: I just learned that in Thai Language, the word for "UGLY" is pronounced "Key-day". Interestingly, in Japanese, Key-day spelled kirai in romanji, means "BEAUTIFUL". I find it interesting how the same word can have such different meanings across various languages.

Another one I remember is that "Jin-Jin" in Japanese means "Penis", but in Italian, it means "Cheers".

Does anyone else know of such cases? The words don't have to be pronounced 100% exactly the same between the two languages, but just need to be close enough.


Maryam
Saturday 14th of August 2004 12:29:39 AM
Well, for example, when I was in Haiti it was a bit difficult (in the beginning) to say "money" in the popular way: cho-cho. Money is "kob" in creole, but popularly, in the markets and the countryside it is said "cho-cho" . And the same word exists in Spain for the female sex in a rude way of talking.

Also in spain we say "concha" to express a shell; in Argentina "concha" is "again" the female sex in a rude way.

"Bollo" in spanish means a kind of bread for hamburguer. In cuba is the female sex and etc etc.

As for other words: in arabic there is the word "barra" that means "out!" , and in spanish means bar like chocolat bar. I should sit down and start thinking but I am sure there are many more words.


Mohamed
Sunday 15th of August 2004 03:20:27 AM
left and left :): it's really an interesting subject Jeff, here's one :
"left" is a known word in english, its pronouncation is the same as the arabic name of the TURNIP :).

regards.



Mohamed
Sunday 15th of August 2004 04:00:32 PM
another 2 words:
"Feel" verb is pronounced the same as the arabic name of "Elephant".
"Clap" ::= "dogs" in arabic (so be careful ;))


alicja
Monday 30th of August 2004 10:50:57 PM
In Polish 'czerstwy' means 'stale' (when talking about bread), but in Czech 'czerstwy' (these words in both languages are pronounced the same but there is a small difference in spelling; in Czech it's written without 'z' but with a little sign above the letter 'c') means 'fresh' also talking about bread. :)
So when a Pole goes to the Czech Republic he must look for a 'stale' bread in the shop!
And a Czech can't be suprised when we say that we don't eat 'fresh' bread.


bambi
Wednesday 01st of September 2004 06:07:38 PM
You're right about Jin - Jin (we write it cin cin though and pronounce it more or less as cheen cheen), and I can tell you that from my own very experience..
A few years ago we were having a "formal dinner" with a group of 30 Japanese businessmen and when it was time to propose a toast, my grandmother, who was quite excited to have guests from so far away, stood up and said "Cin cin!"
All the Japanese flushed, then they started giggling helplessly, much to my granny's amazement... it was only when the interpreter told her what she had just said that she too flushed and started apologising in anyway she could! it was a funny scene...

One more example for this topic: "dai!" in Italian means "come on!".. the only problem is that it is pronounced exactly like the English "die!"


Marta
Thursday 02nd of September 2004 10:58:18 PM
my examples:D: i want to tell you about my funny discoveries:)
For example Romanian word "dupa" (doopa) means just "after" while in Polish that's "bum":D
And when you say "Good morning" in Dutch, you say sth like "goetje morgen" (i'm not sure if i wrote it correctly, maybe sb can check that...?:) ) and first word is pronounced like "hooye", which written in Polish "chuje" means penis in a vulgar way (actually that's plural - penises...? )
quite funny, isn't it?
:D


phoenix07
Tuesday 07th of September 2004 03:47:22 PM
cant find any good ones right now.. :O
persian "man" means "i am"..
the "too" means "in" or "at"..
"sang" means "stone"..
"beeni/beany" means "nose"..
"soozan" means "needle"
persian "setare" means "star" but in written arabic it means "curtain"..
i'll type more later, my brain is currently out of service :")


Branco
Monday 20th of September 2004 09:09:54 PM
Hi Marta,
the Dutch word for good morning is goede morgen of goeie morgen. And i'm not sure if you mean that "hooye" is Dutch as well, but "hoi" means hi, if that's the word you mean.

I have some examples as well.
The Portuguese word 'puxar' (pronounce x as sj) which you find written on doors means 'pull' compared to English 'push' which means the exact opposite.

The German word 'einladen' means to invite, but in Dutch the word 'inladen' means to load something into a truck.
So when you say: ich habe meine Grossmutter eingeladen, then many Dutch children translate this as: I have loaded
my grandmother into a truck.


fleur_flower
Monday 04th of October 2004 07:53:22 AM
Originally posted by Marta


i want to tell you about my funny discoveries:)
For example Romanian word "dupa" (doopa) means just "after" while in Polish that's "bum":D
And when you say "Good morning" in Dutch, you say sth like "goetje morgen" (i'm not sure if i wrote it correctly, maybe sb can check that...?:) ) and first word is pronounced like "hooye", which written in Polish "chuje" means penis in a vulgar way (actually that's plural - penises...? )
quite funny, isn't it?
:D

Hi Branco!
Another dutch? ;)
I think I know what Martha means. She wrote "hooye" to pronounce "goeie" instead of "goede".
A polish colleague told me about that too this week. That's why she never says "goeie", She just can greets someone with that word because she knows what it means in another language :p

Jeff!
I think I still have another word for you.
We say "Nee" in dutch for "No" while it means "Yes" in greece.

have fun!


Stine
Sunday 10th of October 2004 05:16:49 AM
The English word "lord" is in Danish sometimes pronounced as the Danish "lort" (shit)
The word "fart" means in Danish "speed, pace"
When you in Denmark take the elevator, it will sometimes say "i fart" ["i fart" = "in speed/pace"]. "I fart" means something else in English ;)


Anonymous
Thursday 21st of October 2004 06:48:23 PM
a lot of strange simularities.

"tease" in english the same pronounced in Lebanon is "TIZ" which means "ass" in english.

Give me a "Kiss" in english.
If you say "kiss" in lebanon . that means Female genetic organ.

usualy when girls are angry. you can Hear the phrase
"kiss me again" which intended "no f__king way"!

strange world.:)


rbruma
Tuesday 09th of November 2004 09:40:43 PM
Just wanting to point out that Eng. 'boss' is pronounced exactly as the Latin 'bos', meaning 'ox'. One might wonder whether the concepts themselves are not strongly related...


karesz
Wednesday 10th of November 2004 04:20:20 PM
The English pronounced "fuck" means "trees" in Hungarian (written: fk).

The pronounced Spanish rude word "chocho" (fem. sex) in Hungarian is the name of a game (table football, written: csocs). In Hungarian it has no bad meaning at all. It turned out when i wanted my friends to play this game with me. I didn't know the name of this game in Spanish so i called them to play "chocho". They looked at me in a strange way...

The pronounced Spanish word "duda" (=doubt) means two things in Hungarian:
1. horn (claxon)
2. boobs
Once my Spanish boss told me that she had a doubt (una "duda") and wanted my help, first i was surprised.

In Hungarian the pronounced English word pussy (written: puszi) means a kiss that is not given on the lips (generally it is a kiss on the face). There is an urban legend about a newbie female teacher who welcomed the English visitors with a big hello and offered a big kiss on their face: "... and let me give you a real Hungarian puszi!" Just imagine their confused faces...

The spanish word "mar" (sea in English) is pronounced the same way like the Hungarian "mr", that means "already". The English word "sea" is pronounced like "sz". The slang of "suck" is "sz" in Hungarian. The English word "sea" is pronounced almost like "s". "S" means "yes" in Spanish.

The English word "all" is pronounced like "l" in Hungarian, that means "pound" (place where you keep your animals like pigs, dogs, etc).

The pronounced letter "A" means "night" in Hungarian (written: j).
The Spanish word "mi" (my ...) means "we" in Hungarian (written: mi).
"Root" means ugly in Hungarian (written: rt).


Lyddi
Thursday 02nd of December 2004 03:46:25 PM
Serbian: puta
Serbian multiply
Portuguese prostitute

briga
Serbian concern, care, worry
Portuguese fight, quarrel

stanica
Serbian - station
Croatian cell



Former_Member
Saturday 01st of January 2005 03:38:06 PM
Originally posted by Freja


The English word "lord" is in Danish sometimes pronounced as the Danish "lort" (shit)
The word "fart" means in Danish "speed, pace"
When you in Denmark take the elevator, it will sometimes say "i fart" ["i fart" = "in speed/pace"]. "I fart" means something else in English ;)

In swedish, a driveway would be marked with a sign saying "in fart". My brother and I found this quite funny when visiting there. Also, lord in english would be "lort" in Swedish, meaning sounds. For example, "how does it sound" would be "hur lort de" (phonetically, regretably, I can not write Swedish :-/)


Jadokesa
Saturday 01st of January 2005 10:42:56 PM
Between Swedish, Norwegian and Danish you will find a lot of same word different meanings.

The word "laugh" (verb) is a bit strange:
Swedish: Skratta
Norwegian: Le
Danish: Grine

"Att le" in Swedish means "to smile", and "att grina" means "to cry".

Originally posted by Nine
In swedish, a driveway would be marked with a sign saying "in fart".
Actually, it is one word: "infart".

Originally posted by Nine
Also, lord in english would be "lort" in Swedish, meaning sounds. For example, "how does it sound" would be "hur lort de" (phonetically, regretably, I can not write Swedish :-/)

Lort has the same meaning as in Danish (shit), just a bit milder. I guess you are refering to the verb "lter", which could, depending on the dialect, be pronounced a bit like lort.

"Hur lter det" is the correct spelling. I would say "Hu lt'ere". But I speak a version of the northern Swedish dialect :)


sandman
Friday 21st of January 2005 10:21:34 PM
in all romance languages 'idiotism' (with slight differences in writing) means 'idiom' while in russian this word means 'idiocy' %)

gift in english, but poison in german (Gift)


sandman
Sunday 23rd of January 2005 03:57:43 PM
well, i recalled some more %)

- 'rock' in english but 'skirt' in german (Rock) and 'fate' in russian (рок )
- 'bright' in english but 'wide' in german (breit)
- 'pian' in romanian (piano) but 'drunk' in russian (пьян )
- 'cerdac' in romanian (basement) but 'garret (loft)' in russian (чердак )
- 'preservative' in english but 'condom' in russian (презерватив ) and romanian (prezervativ), whereas the word that apparently comes from english 'condom' in russian is very rude
- 'popa' in romanian (the priest) but 'bottom' (not rude, more neutral or children's) (попа ), whereas 'priest' in russian is 'pop' (поп )
- 'ja' in german (yes) but 'I' in russian (я ) and 'she' in romanian ('ea')
- both 'nu' (no) and 'da' (yes) in romanian mean 'yes' in russian (ну, да )
- 'beach' in english but 'whip' or 'weif' in russian (бич )
- 'dura' in latin (hard) but 'fool (female)' in russian (дура )
- 'cony' in english mean 'horses (male)' in russian (кони )
- 'dome' in english but 'house' in russian (дом )
- 'clean' in english but 'wedge' in russian (клин )
- 'trup' in romanian (body, trunk) but strictly 'corpse' in russian (труп )
- 'vlaga' in romanian (the blood) but 'moisture' in russian (влага )
- 'spit' in english but '(he/she) sleeps' in russian (спит )
- 'pot' in english but 'sweat' in russian (пот )

well, it seems i can go on endlessly %)
just a couple of interesting facts
- in chinese and japanese there are two hieroglyphs, one of them means 'spouse' in chinese but 'lover' in japonese, with the other it's just the other way round %)
- in chinese there're several words which sound like the most foul words in russian. even long phrases can be composed in chinese which consist almost only of such words. i know a chinese proverb of that kind. but i think, i should not post it here %)
- once i've seen a site where was collected a lot of phrases in different languages, which sound rude, funny etc. in russian. i don't remember the link, but the most of the stuff was very vulgar. one example - english phrase 'chop is dish' sounds like 'why are you telling lies/nonsence/talking too much ?' in a very foul russian language


kea
Monday 24th of January 2005 03:37:07 PM
in Estonian: there is something quite dirty about Estonian language for English speaking people. Maybe I shouldn't write it here but it just is pretty funny and gives foregners a good laugh always here in Estonia:
'cheers' in estonian is 'terviseks' which pronounced sounds a lot like 'terrible sex' in English
'12 months' in Estonian is 'kaksteist kuud' which in pronounciation is exactly the same as 'cocks taste good' ;)



rienn
Friday 18th of March 2005 12:51:33 AM
pusing - in malay it means "goes in round" or "turn around" but in indonesian it means "headache"

kabur - in malay it means "blurry" but in indonesian it means "run away"

sarang - in malay it means "nest" but in korean it means "love"

bab - in malay it means "chapter" but in korean it means "rice"

dos - in malay it means "dosage" but in spanish it means "two"

selamat - in malay it means "safe" or if combine with another word it will be a greeting eg. "selamat pagi" (good morning), but in tagalog "salamat" (take note of the spelling difference) means "thank you"


i believe there are more but can't remember them right now.. will add up as i find them..




wanda_45
Saturday 26th of March 2005 09:39:58 AM
words: serbiam...kurva (whore)
spanish...curva (curve).....both same pronunciation

brazil....Lula (Brazilian president)
pakistan..lula (penis)....It was funny when Mr. Lula
visited Pakistan

in Argentina.....cajeta (means xxx..bad word)
in Mexico........cajeta ( means milk jam)




vetbook
Thursday 14th of April 2005 07:16:33 AM
for thai: Do-fun =
(in english) Do fun
(in thai)watch the teeth
jin-jin
(in japanese) penis
(in thai) really!

eg. "I really need (it) to use." in thai is "Shan tongkarn shai jin jin." Japanese in Thailand will understand like "I want to use penis."


chudori
Saturday 04th of June 2005 07:08:32 PM

Indonesian SAMA means the same but SAMA in Tetum means to step

Indonesian TERUS means to continue but TERUS in Tetum means to suffer

Also in regard to rienn's post concerning the word KABUR, it also means blurry in indonesian, same as malay.



Ulven
Saturday 04th of June 2005 07:34:18 PM
I think it would amuse me if I was a cashier, and a swedish person said "Hur str det till?" (Swedish for "How are you?") , I'd find it funny. Because on my cassette, the Swedish lady sounds like she's saying "Who stole the till (cash resister)?" in a foreign accent. I'm almost inclined to try it, whilst vaguely gesturing toward the till with an ambiguously animated look on my face. But no, I'm a grown-up.:D

I find it amusing when I confuse Swedish 'but' with French 'but', because there's no consequence, as they're pronounced similar enough that the listner doesn't know I messed up languages. < an example of the opposite of 'different meanings for same words'.


Mery
Saturday 04th of June 2005 09:57:51 PM
French: This topic makes me think of a good example in French :D I went to the zoo with my Canadian friend a few weeks ago and he asked me how to say 'a seal' in French. I replied un phoque. He found it funny because 'phoque' has the same pronunciation as the word f***.

Hmm there's also the word bite in French which has the same pronunciation as 'bit' in English, but it means something completely different 8-) une bite = a cock

I'll think of other examples :D


fiamma_gt
Sunday 12th of June 2005 10:32:05 AM


Rata means rat in Spanish and installment in Italian


bisaya
Thursday 01st of December 2005 12:32:16 AM
talking about differences, we have lots of those here.

in tagalog "langgam" means "ant" in cebuano it means "bird"

then the word "palit" for a tagalog it means "to exchange", and for a visayan it means "to buy" but it's not surprising though coz the trade during ancient times is through barter where you exchange goods and not trade in peso and dollars. so, "to buy" is "to exchange". (kinda related and kinda make sense)

but there are other words that have very different meaning in each language. same words but different meaning.

like:
"kadjot lang, nalibog ko" to a cebuano it simply means "wait a minute (kadjot or kadiot), i'm confused (libog)!" but to a tagalog it means "i want sex (kadjot) coz i am feeling lust." and so dont be surprised if a cebuano man gets confused why he was slapped by a tagalog lady when he was simply telling the lady to say things slowly.

we also have words like "Sili". to a tagalog it means "chili" but to a leytenhon-samarnon it means "penis". there was even a lady we know who is from manila (tagalog) but married a leytenhon and now lives in leyte, she went to the market to buy "Big Chili" and because she is tagalog she understandably ask for a "Malaking Sili" and she wondered why the people seems to be laughing, well, she didn't know that she was actually asking people if they have a "big penis" and she even describe how it looks like and think about how you would describe a "Big Chili"?!? (it is red, it is long and pointed..)

There was also this funny story by a leytenhon friend who went to cebu and while in cebu he met a cebuano friend who ask him in cebuano "O, naa lagi ka dri?" [ey, why are you here (in cebu)?], and he (the leytenhon) respond with "Kay wa koy libang." and it is so funny because "libang" to a cebuano means "to defecate" while to a leytenhon it means "to have leisurely things to do." so, when our leytenhon friend says "Kay wa koy libang" what he mean was "i have no leisurely things to do [that is why he was in cebu]." but to the cebuano it means "i haven't defecate." making the cebuano presume he (the leytenhon) was taking a walk because he had a problem with getting the content of his intestines out (constipation). our leytenhon friend was a little embarassed when he realized the mistake he made.

There was also this incident when we went to the beach with some tagalog and cebuano friends. we heard the tagalog ask the cebuano: "Napagod ka?" and the cebuano looks at his hands and nodded. and we realized that they probably didn't understand each other because "napagod" to the tagalogs means "to be tired" but to the cebuanos it means "to be scorched/sunburned". so, "Napagod ka?" to the tagalogs means "Were You tired (from swimming)?" but to a cebuano it means "Had you been scorched/sunburned?" or "Are You sunburned?".

the word "uragon" in bicolano is a compliment while to a waray it is an insult.

uragon in bicolano means "someone who have ability and talents and have a great sex appeal." but to a waray it means "someone who is full of lust, someone who is too preoccupied with sex."

"uwat" incebuano means "scar" in waray it means "someone who is an ignoramus. who is low-tech and very rural person."


joziboy
Thursday 01st of December 2005 02:52:18 AM
The Afrikaans word for 'sentence' is sin, pronounced exactly the same as the English word 'sin' :)

The Italian word serve means 'it is useful' or 'it helps' - although the e at the end is said, so it doesn't sound quite like English 'serve'... and then there's the word that always confuses people new to Italian caldo which means 'hot' but is pronounced a lot like 'cold'! :D


leobloom
Friday 02nd of December 2005 12:47:55 AM
Italian words
camera = room =o)
mobile = furniture (a single one) =o)



Dawnlorraine
Tuesday 13th of December 2005 09:44:45 AM
I also found out that there's a word asyn in Afrikaans, which means vinegar.

Spelled differently but pronounced the same, asin in Tagalog means salt.


Mathieu
Thursday 15th of December 2005 06:44:57 AM
Dutch "doen" (to do) = German "machen",
but
Dutch "maken" (to make) = German "herstellen",
but
Dutch "herstellen" (to repair) = German "reparieren"..
sigh.. :p

The Dutch word for "construction worker" is "bouwvakker" (/bAufAk@R/) of that the "vakker" part is pronounced as good as identical to a not so polite English word ;) (to accentuate that a bit I might use an English 'r' in that word :D)
To add some power to a statement, you could add "hoor" (/hO:R/) after a sentence in Dutch. An English speaker will wonder why the speaker addresses him/her with "whore" ;)

And yeah, it is true that you could introduce yourself here as "Dick de Cock" without raising any eyebrows :D

This is not Dutch's problem though; I know of examples the other way around just as well, but let's not go into that :D


Dawnlorraine
Thursday 15th of December 2005 07:53:05 AM
awa in Kurdish means tune

in Tagalog, awa means mercy

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