English "i Dig It" What Does This Mean?

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Ana_Drobot
Wednesday 29th of November 2006 12:52:21 AM
"I dig it": Could anyone tell me please what does the phrase "I dig it" mean?
I have an example below:

"I Dig It When You Have A Smile On Your Face" (Van Morrison)



Danial
Wednesday 29th of November 2006 01:40:12 AM
Usually, "I dig it" can mean either

"I get it", "I understand it" or "I like it"

So in this context it mean,

"I like it when you have a smile on your face."

Hope this helps :)
Danial


stefan616
Wednesday 29th of November 2006 11:19:54 PM
"I dig it", has a much stronger meaning than "I like it" in this context. The phrase is similar to "dig deep down" which means to find/search for something that is hidden inside yourself, maybe you found strenght inside of yourself during a crisis, that you did not know you had. In this instance, he not only "likes" the smile, he feels very strongly about it also, it "digs" into him, meaning he feels it in a spiritual way. I do not like this phrase myself, or the usage of "dig" in this manner. The first time I heard this "you digg?" I did not understand what it meant. I would generally try to stay away from slang like this. "Dig" can also have sexual connotations, I am sure you can figure out why.



lesombresdeschats
Saturday 13th of January 2007 04:47:31 PM
"dig it" simply means to really like something or think it's "awesome" or "cool" If you said "dig it" in America no one would think anything sexual about it. However, no one really uses the term "dig it" anymore. It is very outdated slang. I am an English native. If you have more questions, please let me know :)

Shawn


Anonymous
Tuesday 20th of February 2007 04:14:04 PM
"A Plum in your Mouth: Why the way we talk speaks volumes about us" by Andrew Taylor (pg.134)

"...the West African language established itself for some time as a common tongue among many slaves in the Southern States. It also brought a few words of its own into the language, often through the medium of black music - the Wolof hipi means to see or be aware, and survives in English as hip, while the slang dig, meaning to like or to sympathize with, comes from the Wolof degg, to understand."

In Ireland we sometimes use 'dig' but it more than likely comes from the Irish phrase: "an dtuigeann tú mé?" (do you understand me? pron.: un digin teu may)

so one might say in English: D'ya dig me? - I dig it! (Do you understand / get it? - I understand / get it!)

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