Finnish Finnish Phrases 01 Alphabet/aakkoset (british Pronunciation)

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Marja
Saturday 07th of January 2006 09:47:41 PM
Finnish PHRASES 01: Hei kaikki! Tervetuloa opiskelemaan suomea!
(Hi all! Welcome to studying Finnish!)

ALPHABET
AAKKOSET

The Finnish alphabet is based on the latin alphabet as used in many other European languages with the addition of the characters ä ö and å.

The Finnish alphabet is as follows, using the format:
Letter, [Finnish name] > Letter pronunciation (British)

Aa, [aa] > When short (a), like (u) in [cup], When long (aa), like [a] in [car]
Bb, [bee] > As in English, like (b) in [bun]
Cc, [see] > As in English, like [c] in [cell]
Dd, [dee] > As in English, like [d] in [door]
Ee, [ee] > When short (e), like [e] in [net], When long (ee), like [e] in [net] but twice as long. Try the word [air] without the [r].
Ff, [äf] > As in English, like [f] in [film]
Gg, [gee] > As in English, like [g] in [gate]
Hh, [hoo] > As in English, like [h] in [hat]. Sounds slightly stronger before a consonant.
Ii, [ii] > When short (i), like (i) in [sit], When long (ii), like [ea] in [seat]
Jj, [jii] > Like English [y] in [yes]
Kk, [koo] > Softer than English [k]
Ll, [äl] > As in English, like [l] in [late]
Mm, [äm] > As in English, like [m] in [man]
Nn, [än] > As in English, like [n] in [now]. When paired with [k] or [g] (nk or ng), it is a
nasal sound eg. [ng] in [singing].
Oo, [oo] > When short (o), like [o] in [rot] but more open, When long (oo), like [au] in [taught] but more open.
Pp, [pee] > Softer than English [p]
Qq, [kuu] > Pronounced like English [k]
Rr, [är] > Rolling sound as in English [brrr] when shuddering with cold.
Ss, [äs] > As in English, like [s] in [stereo]. Slightly hissing in Finnish.
Tt, [tee] > Softer than English [t]
Uu, [uu] > When short (u), like (u) in [full], When long (uu), like [oo] in [boom] but longer.
Vv, [vee] > As in English, like [v] in [video]
Ww, [kaksois-vee] > In instances where it occurs, it would be pronounced like [v] but perhaps a little softer.
Xx, [äks] > Pronounced like [ks] in [locks]. Often just written as [ks].
Yy, [yy] > When short (y), like the first (u) in French [bureau], When long (yy), like the first (u) in French [bureau] but twice as long.
Zz, [tset] > Pronounced like [ts] in [lots]. Often just written as [ts]
Åå, [ruotsalainen oo] > Pronounced like Finnish long [oo]. Only occurs in names and place names (usually of Swedish origin)
Ää, [ää] > When short (ä), like [a] in [cat], When long (ää), like [a] in [cat] but twice as long.
Öö, [öö] > When short (ö), like [er] in [better], When long (öö), like [ur] in [fur].

Please note that consonants b, c, f, w, x and z only usually appear in words of foreign origin.

DIPHTHONGS
DIFTONGIT

ai > like (i) in [bike]
ei > like [ei] in [eight]
ui > like French [oui]
oi > like [oi] in [voice]
yi > like [ui] in French [suis] but Finnish y is less rounded than French u
äi > [ä] followed by a short (i) in the same syllable
öi > [ö] followed by a short (i) in the same syllable
au > like [ow] in [cow]
eu > [e] followed by a short (u) in the same syllable
iu > (i) followed by a short (u) in the same syllable
ou > like [o] in [so] but more rounded
äy > [ä] followed by a short [y] in the same syllable
öy > [ö] followed by a short [y] in the same syllable
ie > like [ie] in Spanish [bien]
uo > (u) followed by a short [o] in the same syllable
> [y] followed by a short [ö] in the same syllable

If anyone feels I have missed something out, let me know and I will sort it.


Jakee
Saturday 07th of January 2006 11:26:59 PM
Are Finnish k, p and t really softer than the English ones? To me the Finnish ones are harder :)



Marja
Sunday 08th of January 2006 12:38:08 AM
It's supposed to be more to do with aspiration. In english we aspirate when pronouncing those letters which makes them seem 'harder' because when pronouncing them in Finnish, you're not supposed to do that.

In one of the books I have somewhere, it gives an example of holding a piece of paper infront of your mouth and saying the letters. In english pronunciation the paper will move with the aspiration. When saying them in Finnish the paper shouldn't move. Hence why they are said to be softer.

Although I think they do sound harsher in Finnish when you are pronouncing a double consonant because you are emphasising that there are the two not just the one.

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