Icelandic Interested In Icelandic Looking For An Icelander To Help

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ScottM
Sunday 21st of August 2005 12:01:24 PM
Interested in Icelandic: I'm interested in learning Icelandic. I hope to go there as a missionary one day, so I'm interested in learning the language and more about the country. If anyone could help me, I'd appreciate it.


kimmerz2
Tuesday 13th of December 2005 02:30:01 PM
why would icelanders need a missionary?


BurningShadow
Tuesday 13th of December 2005 04:10:02 PM
Did you plan to go out, and knock on peoples doors, and/or stop them on the streets?
If so, then you are no better than Jehovah Witness.
It's very arrogant, and very christian, to think you got the right to treat people, like that.


schneelocke
Wednesday 14th of December 2005 05:43:36 AM
Originally posted by ScottM
I'm interested in learning Icelandic. I hope to go there as a missionary one day, so I'm interested in learning the language and more about the country. If anyone could help me, I'd appreciate it.

Almost 95% of all Icelanders belong to one christian church or another already, actually. ^_~ But then, I'm not sure if you're actually talking about christianity, of course (even though the previous poster seems to have assumed so).

That being said, if you want to learn more about Iceland, its [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iceland]Wikipedia entry may be a good starting point, as well as [url=http://www.iceland.org/]the website of the Icelandic foreign service and Iceland's [url=http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/print/ic.html]CIA World Fact Book entry.

As for the Icelandic language, there's a [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Icelandic_language]Wikipedia entry for that as well which you might find helpful, and which also includes further links.

I can't really comment on whether it'd make sense or be a good idea to go to Iceland as a missionary, but I *can* say that Icelandic is a beautiful language that's very worth learning, so I'd recommend checking it out in any case. :)


einhar
Wednesday 14th of December 2005 08:03:41 AM
Yeah, and third of those 95% are strong believers, another third are passive believers and the last third are non believers!
I reckon there are some American missionaries here in Iceland from diffrent christian churches.
Good luck to you ScottM, but I'm pretty sure you won't turn many Icelanders.


ScottM
Wednesday 14th of December 2005 11:40:26 AM
I can do no better than my best. The call of God is not a call to save men. Only He can do that. It is a call to tell them.


einhar
Thursday 15th of December 2005 06:29:38 AM
There is no lack of the Word of the Lord here in Iceland.

And you can even see that we followed the Word of the Lord by banning dead penalty by law in 1928. And no one has been excuted here since 1830.


Ulven
Saturday 17th of December 2005 05:03:10 PM
Especially @ Einar or anyone who has visited Iceland...

I had the impression that Iceland was very Pagan and/or Heathen. Though, I don't doubt there are plenty enough with a long-standing tradition in the Lutheran culture.
I read statistics suggesting that Lutheran religion accounts for 85%, but I think religious statistics are totally pointless, as the census fails to consider whether or not people from religious ancestry are actually religious themselves. eg. My family and I would be represented in the census as Protestant despite that not being the case in reality. I'm curious, are the Pagan/Heathen and Christian traditions in Iceland very evident in everyday life, or are the statistics, as in my country, just empty statistics not refelcting real lifestyles within the country? It seems, from my outside perspective, that Iceland is quite passionate in its folk traditions. Its Pagan roots (Viking related, I suppose) are much more publicized than its Lutheran roots.

As for missionary activity...
So long as the individuals approaching the door are respectful and are willing to learn something from the householder, and not expect just a one-way street, I'm fine with it. I've had a couple of nice conversations mixed between encounters with 'pushy salesmen', shall I say, who really weren't spiritual at all. It all depends on the attitude of the individuals on both sides of the door. Atheists and Christians really know how to pi@@ one another off, don't they?:)lol


einhar
Sunday 18th of December 2005 01:59:42 AM
Most Icelanders are brought up in christanity and although some of them has lost or never believed in God, their morality is christian.
The Lutheran church has over 90% followers. You cant just look at statistic saying that the Lutheran state church has 85% because over 5% of the others are in Lutheran churches also.
The Heathens are called Asa Faith Society and had 872 follovers in 2004.
A good description I've heard from Scandinavians about Icelandic culture compared to Scandinavian culture is that the Icelandic culture is more US American. And I believe that there is some truth in it, though I've never been in the USA myself.

Here are some offical statical facts about Iceland:

http://www.statice.is/?pageid=1180&src=/temp_en/mannfjoldi/trufelog.asp


ScottM
Sunday 18th of December 2005 09:15:50 AM
Originally posted by Ulven


Especially @ Einar or anyone who has visited Iceland...

I had the impression that Iceland was very Pagan and/or Heathen. Though, I don't doubt there are plenty enough with a long-standing tradition in the Lutheran culture.
I read statistics suggesting that Lutheran religion accounts for 85%, but I think religious statistics are totally pointless, as the census fails to consider whether or not people from religious ancestry are actually religious themselves. eg. My family and I would be represented in the census as Protestant despite that not being the case in reality. I'm curious, are the Pagan/Heathen and Christian traditions in Iceland very evident in everyday life, or are the statistics, as in my country, just empty statistics not refelcting real lifestyles within the country? It seems, from my outside perspective, that Iceland is quite passionate in its folk traditions. Its Pagan roots (Viking related, I suppose) are much more publicized than its Lutheran roots.

As for missionary activity...
So long as the individuals approaching the door are respectful and are willing to learn something from the householder, and not expect just a one-way street, I'm fine with it. I've had a couple of nice conversations mixed between encounters with 'pushy salesmen', shall I say, who really weren't spiritual at all. It all depends on the attitude of the individuals on both sides of the door. Atheists and Christians really know how to pi@@ one another off, don't they?:)lol

You're exactly right, Ulven. I'm a firm believer in the old adage, "A man convinced against his will is of the same opinion still." I will tell the message to anyone willing to listen, but I will not try to force it on those that don't want to hear.


schneelocke
Monday 19th of December 2005 02:30:59 AM
Originally posted by ScottM
You're exactly right, Ulven. I'm a firm believer in the old adage, "A man convinced against his will is of the same opinion still." I will tell the message to anyone willing to listen, but I will not try to force it on those that don't want to hear.

You'd still be preaching to the choir, though. :)


ScottM
Monday 19th of December 2005 02:56:31 AM
Not necesarilly, you'd be surprised who is willing, sometimes eager to listen.


nochnaya_vedma
Saturday 24th of December 2005 06:03:05 PM
i've heard of asatru, but i'm curious to know what are icelanders' opinions regarding it, or heathenism in general (any kind, ranging from the incense-candles-dance-around-a-campfire kind to something like den norske hedenske front)?

i read this once and it amused me greatly, even though i can't verify it personally: "the average scandinavian goes to church three times in their life, and twice they're carried in."


ScottM
Sunday 25th of December 2005 08:11:10 AM
Originally posted by nochnaya vedma
i read this once and it amused me greatly, even though i can't verify it personally: "the average scandinavian goes to church three times in their life, and twice they're carried in."

Like you, I don't know if it's true, but I've heard similar statements, also. Einhar or someone could probably tell you more about the truthfulness (or lack thereof) of that statement.


BurningShadow
Sunday 25th of December 2005 08:38:54 PM

"the average scandinavian goes to church three times in their life, and twice they're carried in."

To illustrate the point, of that, I've made a list of the times, I've been at church.
My own baptism ( < is this the English term for trying to drown the baby?). (Forced to. i was less than 1 year old)
My mothers sisters wedding. (Forced to. i was only 6 years old)
My brothers baptism. (Forced to. i was only 6 years old)
I had to go to church five times, prior to confirmation. (Did it, to make my mother happy)
My confirmation. (Did it, to make my mother happy)
My brothers confirmation. (Did it, to make my mother happy)
My mothers sisters body-recycling. (Did it, to help carrying the coffin. Like myself, she wasn't even a christian)

That's eleven times, and I'm only 26 years old...


einhar
Sunday 25th of December 2005 09:37:49 PM
Well guys, I can't tell how often Icelanders goes to church, but I don't go often, last time I went was Nov 27th 2005. Usually, I go for similiar reasons as BurningShadow. As I've said before I'm raised up in Christianity and in that way I'm Christian. One can argue about if I'm Christian or not.

Anyway, I can agree to most of this:

Fyrsta boor
skalt eigi ara gui hafa.

Anna boor
skalt eigi leggja nafn Drottins Gus ns vi hgma.

rija boor
Halda skaltu hvldardaginn heilagan.

Fjra boor
Heira skaltu fur inn og mur.

Fimmta boor
skalt eigi mann deya.

Sjtta boor
skalt eigi drgja hr.

Sjunda boor
skalt eigi stela.

ttunda boor
skalt eigi bera ljgvitni gegn nunga num.

Nunda boor
skalt eigi girnast hs nunga ns.

Tunda boor
skalt eigi girnast konu nunga ns, jn, ernu, fna n nokku a sem nungi inn .




kimmerz2
Tuesday 27th of December 2005 11:35:51 AM
The awful Icelandic language: okay so enough about that and I am sorry to skalt eigi leggja nafn Drottins Gus ns vi hgma. but I thought that this article was very funny and very appropriate for all of us trying to learn icelandic.

I have posted it here...

The Awful Icelandic Language

By Brendan Glacken

People set out to learn Icelandic for various reasons, most of them highly dubious. Some people, not content with their own back gardens, come to Iceland for the sake of adventure, and fall to learning the language for no better reason than an idle curiosity to know what other people are saying. Others will tell you that they wish to read the famous Icelandic sagas in the original, which is hard to believe, since anybody who knows anything can tell you that they are quite sufficiently incomprehensible in translation. Some people of course are satisfied with being mystified in their own language.

Many other people who attempt to learn Icelandic do so because; as they will proudly tell you it is related to their own tongue: it belongs, they claim, to the same language family. All I can say to this is that in every family there are some very suspicious characters, and the less said about them the better.

At heart I suspect all learners of Icelandic of being no better than a sort of literary mountaineers. The are interested in it only because it is there.

Cod-fish is Masculine

Icelandic is a Germanic language. This fact alone should serve as sufficient warning for most people, but no so. Icelandic grammar is so complicated as to make it more Germanic than German itself. Consider, for instance, the question of grammatical gender. In Icelandic, a man is masculine and a woman is feminine. So far so good. But after this, common sense disappears. A pork chop is male, while a Mars bar is neuter. A barber is masculine but his shop is feminine. A cat is masculine, a catalogue feminine, and a child neuter. A Coca-Cola, presumably because of the shape of the bottle is feminine. A bus is masculine, and presumably you understand by now why I often feel like leaping on him and letting him take me as far away as possible from where the Icelandic language is spoken.

Last week I visited the main post office in Reykjavik. My errand was a very simple one, and I spoke entirely in Icelandic. The conversation went as follows:
I would like to post a dainty little parcel to my Aunt Caramelia.
I see. Where is he, and where is he going to?
A long pause ensued at this point, while I looked vacantly around the office. At last I gave up:
Who?
The little parcel, about whom you have spoken.
Another pause, and finally understanding dawns.
Oh him! Why, here he is!
I almost forgot to collect my change (masculine plural).
But to continue: an aerodrome is masculine, while an aeroplane is feminine. Coffins and oil are feminine, but a cod-fish is masculine. A leg, if unspecified, is masculine, but a leg of mutton is neuter. Shoe-laces are feminine, as are vacuum-cleaners, but shoes and vacuum flasks are masculine, and trousers are feminine plural.

Consider, then, the difficulties that face you as you sit down to order your Icelandic breakfast. Though a chicken is masculine, and a hen feminine, an egg of either fowl is neuter. Now, while both coffee and bread are, by a totally unexpected stroke of grammatical logic, completely sexless, a cup of coffee is masculine, and a slice of bread is feminine. Furthermore, after the best Icelandic traditions, all these items are of course grammatically declined. Now I have no intention of lowering the tone of this article by an unnecessary discussion of Icelandic grammatical declensions, but I will say this, that in a friendly land I consider it an unpardonable breach of hospitality that anyone should be asked to decline a cup of coffee, or even an egg regardless of its gender before two p.m. at least in the afternoon. It is enough to give one indigestion before even beginning ones meal.

Six or Sex?

But there is an even more hair-raising problem involved in the superficially simple act of ordering breakfast in Iceland. As if it were not enough to have to decline every adjective, noun, pronoun, personal name and place name, every man, woman and child, every single peice of toast, every pork-chop and every bowl of skyr: the devilish inventor of the Icelandic language has ordained that for the good measure, the numbers from one to four, inclusive, shall also be declined. Nobody who has never tried to speak Icelandic can conceive of the traumas for which this playful little rule is responsible.

Picture yourself sitting at the hotel table. You have carefully learned the Icelandic words for toast and coffee, and the simple discovery that the word for an egg is egg has renewed interest in comparative linguistics, and put you at peace with the world. Along comes the waiter:
Egg you say firmly, taking care to follow your book by putting the stress on the first syllable.
How many? says he.
You are trapped. How were you to know that egg can mean more than one egg? So if all you want is one, is it einn, ein, or eitt egg? Two cups of coffee do you ask for tveir, tvaer or tvo? Thrir, Thrjar or thrju slices of toast? Well, which is it? You dont know?
Of course you dont. I dont know either. In fact, at this stage I dont even care. I assume the appearance of a deaf mute, and I use my fingers for counting, as sensible people did before the invention of outrageous languages like Icelandic.

If however you possess a little more nerve than does the ordinary individual, there is another method of crashing the barrier of Icelandic declension of numerals. This consists of avoiding completely the numbers from one to four, and simply asking for five of everything. The Icelandic word for five is fimm, and a part from being easy to pronounce, its great advantage is that it never changes at all.

Cup of coffee, sir?
Yes, five.

Admittedly, when you are eventually confronted by five cups of coffee, five plates of toast, five glasses of orange juice and five hard boiled eggs, you may get the feeling that people are looking your way. You may even be right. But take no notice. Console yourself with the knowledge that had you attempted to grammatically decline any of the items in front of you, you would doubtless have suffered the fate already referred to, namely that of indigestion before even beginning to eat; now, however, you can tackle your meal with relish, and worry about indigestion later on.

A point of humour

While not practicable everywhere, this method of ordering is a singularly effective one in Icelandic hotel bars. I have noticed that even in the most crowded establishments a space is quickly cleared for the individual who orders his drink in the manner outlined above. If nothing else, the five-fold order in Iceland at least engenders respect.

Icelandic is no language for the fastidious. A friend of mine, who has been studying the language for close on ten years, has informed me privately that it contains more Common nouns and Irregular verbs than he would care to mention. I myself heard used, in the presence of ladies, some highly irregular verbs, and some of the commonest nouns imaginable. I have now made it a point of honour with myself, when in mixed company, to leave the room immediately on the utterance of any of these words, and to return only when some semblance of respect for female company has been restored. (In small gatherings my frequent exits and re-entrances scarcely cause any disturbance at all, but at larger affairs, where I have to be formally announced, or rather re-announced up to twenty or twenty-five times, I regret to say that I have occasionally noticed a certain weariness of expression on the face of the butler to whom this duty falls).

Icelandic presents another problem of an even more delicate nature. Now I do not consider myself a prudish person, nor do I easily flinch; but though the Icelandic word for six is a very simple one, and indeclinable, I have never yet been able to bring myself to ask in Icelandic for six of anything. If it is essential that I have, for example, six blood puddings, I ask for five, and then, as casually as possible, I for another. I do no attempt to explain this behaviour. Suffice it to say that where I come from, six has one meaning, and sex another meaning altogether.

Lest anyone think at this point that Icelandic possesses no virtues at all, let me hasten to show that this is not true. In the first place the Icelandic language displays, as English does not, a healthy contempt for euphemism. For example, when an Englishman speaks of the denudation of the country-side, the process referred to sounds no more objectionable than the process of undressing for bed; but when an Icelander speaks of uppblastur we are not only given a mental picture of the process, but also a hint of how the man feels about it. Again, if you didnt know what diabetes was, you could never discover its meaning from itself without knowing Greek; but sykursyki is sugar sickness and no Icelander could mistake it for anything else. Anyone might be forgiven for thinking the English term casuist to be a complimentary one, but a breakdown of the corresponding term in Icelandic shows that an ordaflaekjumadur is precisely that a word-ravelling man.

Some Icelandic words and phrases contain a great deal more meaning than their length would suggest. Such a word is ha, which translates loosely to English as I beg your pardon, Im afraid I didnt quite catch what you just said and would you mind repeating it? Clearly, this is a very handy word to have at ones disposal, and has the advantage of being easy to learn. I myself mastered it within a week. Equally useful is the phrase thad er nefnilga thad. Literally this means no more than that is namely that, but in conversational style it is used to signify complete agreement with what the other person is saying, usually when what the other person is saying is of no consequence whatsoever. Armed with this phrase and the word ha, the learner of Icelandic is adequately prepared for any conversational emergency that may arise.

Icelanders speak very fast. In fact in this respect there are as bad as the French, and everybody knows what they are like. For the person who is unprepared, the speed at which Icelandic is spoken can occasionally lead to highly embarrassing situations. Only last week, for example, a friend of mine was sitting in a Reykjavik restaurant studying the menu when a particularly attractive Icelandic waitress approached, smiled, and said Kata. At least, that was what it sounded like to him. In fact of course, as anyone who has studied the language for only a couple of years or so could easily have told, the waitress said hvad var thad? meaning what was that?, meaning may I get of some assistance? But how could my friend have known all this? Under the circumstances he reacted only as a gentleman could do: without a moments hesitation he leaped up, oferred his hand to the young lady, and shouted Harry.

The Icelandic language displays a highly ambiguous attitude towards the human body. Where as for example in most languages the parts of the human body are accorded the dignity of being governed by Possessive Pronouns, in Icelandic they are governed by that most ignominious of all grammatical terms, the Preposition. Again, Icelandic nouns are differentiated not only on the basis of gender, but also with just as little discrimination on the basis of whether they are strong or weak, so that no matter how healthy you are the Icelandic doctor inspecting your tongue will always see it exactly as he sees his grandmother - Feminine and Weak. And if nothing else will teach you humility, consider the following: in Icelandic your eyes, ears, lungs and kidneys are lumped together into the tiny class of nouns derisively referred to as Weak Neuters, where to my knowledge they have for company only hnodu: and bjugu, or balls of yarn, and sausages.

Icelandic grammar affords more consolation to the afflicted than to the healthy. Though a man be in the final stages of some devastating disease, let him come to Iceland and take heart (no joke intended): his knees, his liver and his legs remain Strong.

Oh, Dear Lord

Oh, but see the clock! She lacks only ten minutes to eight, and I must fly! My dinner waits, he grows cold, quickly must I eat him. Then comes my friend, together shall we see the film she must be good! Homewards intend I then, to read the Icelandic book, hardly indeed can I wait. So entertaining she is, my Icelandic grammar, so full of funny things, of outrageous constructions like these for example, and nothing she at all of appropriating a sex to an inanimate log of wood or a sheepskin or a carrot. Oh, I must study her more, must practise myself, as she so engagingly puts it. And so finally will come the day, or so she promises, when the Icelandic language I shall speak like a native, though a native of what country she declines to specify; when I shall speak it so well and so fast that Icelanders will understand me perfectly, and I shant know at all what I saying myself; when at last oh happy day I shall have a completely mastered the Icelandic language; but oh dear me, oh, my poor nerves, oh dear Lord oh Christ AT WHAT COST AT WHAT COST!

Brendan Glacken is an Irish Student at the University of Iceland. This article was passed on to my during my first Icelandic Course.








schneelocke
Thursday 29th of December 2005 12:41:09 AM
Strange article, that. Maybe the author doesn't realise, but English is a Germanic language as well - so that alone is no guarantee that there'll be grammatical gender and declination in a language (not that English is free of that, anyway: pronouns at least are still declined in English).

Besides, what's wrong with these things, anyway? Declination at least generally allows for a less strict sentence structure, which in turn leads to more expressiveness, a kind that's difficult to replicate in a language lacking these things and relying on sentence structure for semantics (to give an example from German, just try translating to English things like "ich bin jetzt hungrig", "jetzt bin ich hungrig" and "hungrig bin ich jetzt", all of which mean "I'm hungry now", preserving the differences in meaning ^^).

Anyhow.. I do realise it's a tongue-in-cheek article, of course, but still, these things just rub me the wrong way. The fact that a language is different from the one you're used to doesn't make it quirky or strange; it just means it's a different language. (And if you take a look at all the world's languages, you'll quickly realise that no matter which one's your native one, most of the world will still use others that substantially differ from yours). :) Not all languages are as bland as modern English... :)


einhar
Thursday 29th of December 2005 02:19:47 AM
Originally posted by schneelocke


Strange article, that. Maybe the author doesn't realise, but English is a Germanic language as well - so that alone is no guarantee that there'll be grammatical gender and declination in a language (not that English is free of that, anyway: pronouns at least are still declined in English).

Besides, what's wrong with these things, anyway? Declination at least generally allows for a less strict sentence structure, which in turn leads to more expressiveness, a kind that's difficult to replicate in a language lacking these things and relying on sentence structure for semantics (to give an example from German, just try translating to English things like "ich bin jetzt hungrig", "jetzt bin ich hungrig" and "hungrig bin ich jetzt", all of which mean "I'm hungry now", preserving the differences in meaning ^^).

Anyhow.. I do realise it's a tongue-in-cheek article, of course, but still, these things just rub me the wrong way. The fact that a language is different from the one you're used to doesn't make it quirky or strange; it just means it's a different language. (And if you take a look at all the world's languages, you'll quickly realise that no matter which one's your native one, most of the world will still use others that substantially differ from yours). :) Not all languages are as bland as modern English... :)
Very true.
I've heard that there is a tribe in Asia, probably in Indonesia, they lack one word, the civilised world can't be without and there is no thought or anything they have instead. They just don't understand the meaning of it. If I remember it right, this word is, NO!


nochnaya_vedma
Friday 30th of December 2005 05:01:10 PM
somewhere out there exists a very similar article, that's been written about russian and therefore expanded into a small epic novel.


Rikard
Friday 13th of January 2006 03:53:23 AM
I might add, concerning church visits, that neither are we here in sweden known for visiting them scarcely.

Many believe in god, more i suppose do it out of tradition and then there are the atheists who probobly visists church only at weddings and such.

Myself i must have visited church at least 50 times or so during my 23 years and do not consider myself a religious man. In fact, i do not believe in god and consider myself an agnosticist (is that have you say it in english?)

(please excuse my lack up capital letters in my posts. They are quite intentional :))


einhar
Friday 13th of January 2006 05:59:56 AM
Three - Þrír: Once upon a time there was a foreigner living in Iceland and at his work there was a tradition for sending one of the workers for bread.
This foreigner was fairly good in Icelandic but he never learned to pronounce the letter "". His coworkers wanted to make fun of him for that. And when it was his turn to buy some bread, they asked him to buy one bread and three doughnuts (rj kleinuhringi).
The foreigner went to the bakery and said "Good morning, I'll have one bread" and then he hesitated for a moment because he couldn't say "rj", but this was a clever guy and he added "and I'll also have two doughnuts and would you be so kind to add one to the other two"!


suomenjaeger
Thursday 19th of January 2006 09:31:27 PM
Hello,

I am from Iceland, and I hate missionaries. You people are so annoying. If we want to worship god, then we will, if we dont then leave us alone.

Most Icelanders yes, do belong to a church, but don't go to church alot. Many of the older people who are traditional do though, but at least myself and almot all my friends and girlfriend do not even beleive in god or have an interest in religion. We have bigger things to worry about. I am Buddhist though and my friends think its cool and are thinking of doing it to, but see, I didnt ask them, they asked me cause they were intersted in my religion. So stop preaching, its annoying, if people want to find your god they will just ask you!! Dont bring it to Iceland though! Your not welcomed as a missionary, but more than welcomed as a tourist :-)

As for Icelandic, don't worry everyone here speaks English very well, better than most Americans in the southern states :). Hehe..no problem. If you are an english speaker, there is a good book called Colloquial Icelandic, comes with CDs too, get them.

Oh, I should add too, if you come to Iceland for missionary stuff, here is a good phrase in Icelandic you will hear a lot ;-)
Faru rassgat

Kveyja,
Jarrtt



einhar
Tuesday 24th of January 2006 02:52:39 AM
Originally posted by suomenjaeger


Hello,

I am from Iceland, and I hate missionaries. You people are so annoying. If we want to worship god, then we will, if we dont then leave us alone.

Most Icelanders yes, do belong to a church, but don't go to church alot. Many of the older people who are traditional do though, but at least myself and almot all my friends and girlfriend do not even beleive in god or have an interest in religion. We have bigger things to worry about. I am Buddhist though and my friends think its cool and are thinking of doing it to, but see, I didnt ask them, they asked me cause they were intersted in my religion. So stop preaching, its annoying, if people want to find your god they will just ask you!! Dont bring it to Iceland though! Your not welcomed as a missionary, but more than welcomed as a tourist :-)

As for Icelandic, don't worry everyone here speaks English very well, better than most Americans in the southern states :). Hehe..no problem. If you are an english speaker, there is a good book called Colloquial Icelandic, comes with CDs too, get them.

Oh, I should add too, if you come to Iceland for missionary stuff, here is a good phrase in Icelandic you will hear a lot ;-)
Faru rassgat

Kveyja,
Jarrtt
You just have to add in your text "Because I am as I am, I am better and more perfect than the rest of you". There is a word in German that describes you well, it's "BESSERWISSER".
But I'm sure ScottM will forgive for being so childish.
I wouldn't recommend anyone to learn Icelandic from you. This is based on these words in your text: "Faru rassgat" and "Kveyja, Jarrtt".
How can you give your Icelandic knowledge 4 stars when 2 out of 5 of these words are incorrect?



Dr__Zoidberg
Tuesday 24th of January 2006 06:57:09 AM
second: Einar, I couldn't have said it better.

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