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mike111
Thursday 17th of January 2008 09:35:15 PM
Foods / Recipes: I'm felt the necessity to begin a new thread for "Recipes/Food"! So post what ever info you would like.

BTW - I would love to try some Romanian Recipes.

Since we have discussed halupki and halushki in another thread I looked up some recipes and info on them.

[Quote: (Halupki) "These are much better the second day." ]
My wife recently made halupki and I had said the same thing!

Halupki - 4 variations

These are a common Eastern European dish, called halupki in Slovak, galumbki in Polish, and also known as stuffed cabbage rolls. There is also a Middle Eastern dish like this, you can make this recipe and then just add yogurt to the sauce after you put them on the plate. I originally looked at a recipe for these in a Polish cookbook by Mariana Olszewska Heberle, but by now it's so different, I think this version is really something I just channeled from a Slovak foremother.

* 3 heads cabbage
* 2 ½ pounds meat - beef, pork, or a combination
* 1 ½ cup cooked rice
* 3 cans beef broth
* 1 big can V-8 vegetable juice

Get the cabbage ready by cutting out the core completely. Dunk one head at a time into a big pot of boiling water, and take off the leaves one-by-one with tongs as they separate. Lay each leaf flat and slice off the top of the tough stems in the middle of the leaves so they are more flexible to roll.

Mix the meat and the rice together with your hands.

Roll the cabbage leaves by taking about 2 tablespoons meat, depending on the size of the leaf, and placing it at the top in the middle. Roll the leaf over once, covering the meat, then fold the sides in, and roll the rest of the way.

Use the very little, and very big leaves to line the top and even the bottom of the pan, it's delicious by itself.

Put the halupki in a big roaster in layers and add the beef broth and V-8. Bake at 325 for 2 ½ hours, basting regularly. These are much better the second day.

Halushki
Noodles, Cabbage and Onions - Halushki

There must be dozens recipes out there, all made by their grandmother's and mother's, who were Polish,Ukranian, Hungarian, Russian or from other's who have some other Eastern European background, but I decided I would add mine which my grandfather, from Rumania, used to make with me in our home in Cuba. My father would just melt when I made this and we served it with brisket and gravy, not that the dish needed anything else. In spite of what the directions may seem this is a quickie noodle dish. UPDATE: 12/27/07 just made this again and I used microwaveable(sp) turkey bacon(special request)and I used crushed red pepper flakes and it was great! We enjoyed it so much and I still would like more since I am only allowed a bite!!!

time to make 30 min 10 min prep
Change to: servings US Metric
1 head cabbage
1 1/2 cups broad egg noodles
1 1/2 cups onions
4 tablespoons unsalted butter or unsalted margarine, and
4 tablespoons virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons minced garlic
1/2 teaspoon brown sugar or Splenda sugar substitute, brown blend
salt, to taste
fresh coarse ground black pepper, to taste

Not the one? See other Noodles, Cabbage and Onions - Halushki Recipes

* < 30 mins Main Dish
* Low Protein Main Dish
* Pasta Main Dish
* Hungarian Main Dish
* Comfort Food Main Dish

1. Variation #1:.
2. Cook broad noodles according to package instructions and drain.
3. Cut up cabbage, onions, add butter, garlic and brown sugar and water.
4. Cook until cabbage is done, making sure no water remains, 5-7 minutes.
5. Pour cabbage over noodles and mix well.
6. Add salt & pepper, to taste.
7. This is a more rustic looking recipe.
8. Variation #2:.
9. Cook the noodles according to package instructions and drain.
10. Cut the cabbage up any way you like, slices or shredded, do the same with the onions, I prefer sliced onions & shredded cabbage.
11. Heat a large pan on medium-high heat.
12. When the pan is hot, add butter/oil combo, or 'grease' of your choice.
13. When the butter & olive oil are hot, add cabbage and onions and saute for a few (about 5 minutes), then add garlic and sugar.
14. Turn down the heat to medium and cover the pan.
15. Let this cook until the cabbage is soft, about 3 more minutes.
16. If you want the cabbage browned more, remove the lid and turn up the heat once again.
17. Add the butter/oil combination as you need it.
18. Add the cooked noodles and serve.
19. Variation #3:.
20. Use 1/2 of the butter/oil combination and turn heat to medium-high, when it is hot; add the onions.
21. Saute the onions with sugar or substitute for about 10 minutes, until they start to caramelize, then add garlic for another 30 seconds to 1 minute.
22. Cook noodles according to package directions, and drain.
23. Place cabbage in large saute pan with 1 Tablespoon of the butter/oil combination and saute until lightly browned.
24. Add the caramelized onions, garlic, cabbage & noodles and marry them for about 1 or 2 minutes, then add salt & pepper, to taste .
25. Serve.
26. *The amount of ingredients you use depends on how much halushki you want to make. Experiment!




Avaldi
Thursday 17th of January 2008 09:56:38 PM
The post I needed! Every weekend me, my best friend (she is Romanian)and more friends cook Romanian food and we have supper before going party. So we are looking for new recipes :)

My pen pal by letter from Slatina, Romania always send me new recipes, so I'll post some of them later. :D


mike111
Thursday 17th of January 2008 10:27:15 PM
Thanks Avaldi. Glad you like the topic. I look forward to trying your recipes.


Avaldi
Friday 18th of January 2008 01:45:36 AM
[color=red]Sarmale cu varza dulce[/color]

[img]http://www.buongiorno-romania.ro/Image/sarmalute.jpg[/img]

My favourite one! :)

Ingredients:

1 large cabbage
1 3/4 lb. (750g) ground meat(pork and beef mixture is best)
4 large onions
2 Tbls. rice
1 bread slice
3 Tbls. lard
5-6 tomatoes or 1 Tbls. tomato sauce
salt
pepper
chopped dill
1 liter sauerkraut juice
sour cream

... and how to cook it

Grind the meat with the crustless bread slice (previously soaked and squeezed dry) and a raw onion. Place in a bowl and mix with rice, dill, pepper, salt, and finely chopped onion slightly fried in 2 Tbls. lard. Mix everything well.
Core the cabbage with a sharp thin knife and then blance it with borsh. Then, carefully, remove the cabbage leaves, one by one, so that they do not tear. Cut larger leaves in 2-3 pieces. Then place a little meat in each cabbage piece and roll inside. The smaller the rolls are, the tastier they are.
Place a layer of rolls in a deep pan, then cover with a layer of chopped (julienned) cabbage, then a layer of thinly sliced tomatoes. Do this layering until all the rolls are made. The last layer must be tomato slices or add tomato sauce. Add a heaping Tablespoon of lard, pour the borsh and let simmer on top of the range for 30 minutes. Then place in the oven so that the liquid is reduced. Serve with sour cream.


My mother cooks it other way, one day my friend and her were speaking about food so my friend gave her the recipe for "sarmale". She tried to cook it, but:
We didn't have sauerkraut juice, and we changed the pork meat for mincemeat. We tried it and... delicious.
My mother cooked it today again, so maybe later I'll take a photo with my mobile and I'll post it here. Salutãri din Spania! :)


mike111
Friday 18th of January 2008 02:47:07 AM
I found this on wikipedia, thought it would be fitting for this thread...


An existential Romanian question is: We eat to live, or live to eat? A great number of proverbs and sayings have developed around the activity of eating. From the innocent child's saying of thanks:

Merci mult pentru masă,
c-a fost bună şi gustoasă,
şi bucătăreasa frumoasă

Thank you for the meal
it was good and tasty
and the cook lady was beautiful

to the more philosophical:

Mulţumescu-ţi ţie Doamne
c-am mâncat şi iar mi-e foame

Thank you Lord
for I have eaten and I am hungry again

and Dragostea trece prin stomac (Love passes through the stomach); or the simple Pofta vine mâncănd (Appetite comes while eating); or the sarcastic Porcul mănâncă orice, dar se-ngraşă pentru alţii (The pig eats anything, but it gets fat for others); or a total fulfillment saying Mâncat bine, băut bine, dimineaţa sculat mort (Ate well, drank well, in the morning woke up dead).




Avaldi
Friday 18th of January 2008 03:14:38 AM

Your proverbs are so good!! We have similar things in our country, in Spain! :)

The photo I promised:

[img]http://www.freewebtown.com/spanishcourse/Imagen051.jpg[/img]

How do you find it?


mike111
Friday 18th of January 2008 03:39:13 AM
The proverbs?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romanian_cuisine


Avaldi
Friday 18th of January 2008 05:03:08 AM

Mulțumesc mult, Mike! :)


Lina
Saturday 19th of January 2008 02:45:36 AM
Ce se întâmplă aici?/What's happening here?

Se mănâncă, se spun poveşti, se învaţă lecţii noi, se joacă! Nu ştiu cine vă mai poate urmări:D

/You eat, read, learn new lessons, play. I don't know who can keep up with you all.

It's great to see your receipts and pictures, as well. Many will get hungry just by looking at them!

Mike, you asked the good question, but reading the receipts and looking at the pictures, one may think the purpose of life is eating;)
I always like to hear the first proverb after a good meal! But we use to say "săru'măna(kiss your hand) pentru masă" not Merci!

I can't believe it! A thread about food and receipts! Well, the only thing for me to do now is to "cook" a specific Romanian meal. Let's see: "mămăligă". Does anyone know what it is or how it is prepared?


mike111
Saturday 19th of January 2008 04:34:33 AM
Salut Lina,

This is from wikipedia....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C4%83m%C4%83lig%C4%83

Mămăligă (/mə.mə'li.gə/, cornmeal mush) is a Romanian dish made out of yellow maize. It is better known to the rest of the world in its Italian form, polenta.
Mămăligă
Mămăligă

Mămăliga is one of the main traditional dishes of Romania. Historically a peasant food, it was often used as a substitute for bread or even as a staple food in the poor rural areas. However, in the last decades it has emerged as an upscale dish available in the finest restaurants.

Traditionally, mămăliga is cooked by boiling water, salt and cornmeal in a special-shaped cast iron pot called ceaun. When cooked peasant-style and used as a bread substitute, Romanian mămăliga is supposed to be much thicker than the regular Italian polenta to the point that it can be cut in slices, like bread. When cooked for other purposes, mămăliga can be much softer, sometimes almost to the consistency of porridge. Because mămăliga sticks to metal surfaces, it can be cut with a string into slices, and is eaten by holding it with the hand, just like bread would be.

Mămăliga is often served with sour cream and cheese on the side (mămăligă cu brânză şi smântână) or crushed in a bowl of hot milk (mămăligă cu lapte). Sometimes slices of mămăligă are pan-fried in oil or in lard, the result being a sort of corn pone.

Since mămăliga can be used as an alternate for bread in many Romanian dishes, there are quite a few which are either based on mămăligă, or include it in some way. Arguably, the most popular of them is sarmale (a type of cabbage rolls) with mămăligă.

Its analogue in Bulgaria is called kachamak (качамак) and is served mainly with white brine cheese (сирене; sirene) or fried pieces of pork fat with parts of the skin (пръжки; prăzhki).

Another very popular Romanian dish based on mămăliga is called bulz, and consists of balls of mămăligă filled with cheese and butter and roasted in the oven.
Mămăligă with sour cream and cheese
Mămăligă with sour cream and cheese

Balmoş (sometimes spelled balmuş) is another mămăligă-like traditional Romanian dish, but is more elaborate. Unlike mămăligă (where the cornmeal is boiled in water) when making balmoş the cornmeal must be boiled in sheep milk. Other ingredients, such as butter, sour cream, telemea (a type of feta cheese), caş (a type of fresh curdled ewe cheese without whey, which is sometimes called "green cheese" in English), urdă (a type of curdled cheese obtained by boiling and curdling the whey left from caş), etc., are added to the mixture at certain times during the cooking process. It is a specialty dish of the Romanian of old shepherds, and nowadays very few people still know how to make a proper balmoş.

Mămăligă is a versatile food: various recipes of mămăligă-based dishes may include milk, butter, various types of cheese, eggs, sausages (usually fried, grilled or oven-roasted), bacon, mushrooms, ham, etc. Mămăliga is a fat-free, cholesterol-free, high-fiber food. It can be used as a healthy alternative to more refined carbohydrates such as white bread, pasta or hulled rice.


Avaldi
Saturday 19th of January 2008 05:12:44 AM
Originally posted by LinaCe se întâmplă aici?/What's happening here?

Se mănâncă, se spun poveşti, se învaţă lecţii noi, se joacă! Nu ştiu cine vă mai poate urmări:D

/You eat, read, learn new lessons, play. I don't know who can keep up with you all.

Lina, that's how this forum should be: Romanian is a great language and you, Romanians, are great people and hard-working people. Go Romanians and Romania! :)


... NEXT ROMANIAN FOOD ...

[img]http://www.buongiorno-romania.ro/Image/Mititei.jpg[/img]

Mititei or mici (Romanian for little or small - plural) is a traditional Romanian dish, a kind of grilled minced-meat rolls made from beef (usually mixed with mutton and pork meat), which contain garlic, black pepper, savory and sometimes a touch of paprika. Sodium bicarbonate is also added. It is best served accompanied by mustard and beer. The mititei are very popular in Romania.

... AND A PROVERB ...

Peştele cel mai bun, tot porcul rămâne

The best fish will always be the pork


mike111
Sunday 20th of January 2008 05:52:13 AM
Avaldi, Your pictures make my mouth water. I've got to try to cook something soon!


Avaldi
Sunday 20th of January 2008 06:14:26 AM

Yes, Romanian food is delicious :)


Dominick_Korshanyenko
Monday 21st of January 2008 10:42:02 AM
So many posts so little time! :D These all look really good by the way.

Thanks for the recipes,

Kenny


Lina
Monday 21st of January 2008 01:25:05 PM
I didn't even know this much about polenta. If I had to write the recipe, I would have said that it is a thick mush of cornmeal, sliced with the help of a string and that Moldavians are the best at preparing it:D

In the summer, during week-ends, we go "la iarbă verde - green grass"(picnic). We use to say that we go into the forests, because forests are everywhere in Romania!
On most occasions we prepare "mititei"(mici) on barbecue. One can find "mici"(small) already prepared in any market. Indeed, this meal is so good, you can't get enough of, as you can see in Avaldi pictures! All you have to do is place this meat on a barbecue.
Another thing which I enjoy very much is to fry bacon on ember. The only thing you need is a stick, and you can find one anywhere since you are in a forest! You can also bake potatoes on ember. Men are preparing the fire but also the food! Women prepare a salad, at the most, but they take sun-baths and eat the food prepared by men:ho
Youngsters like to go camping and spend the night in the woods. Usually they gather round the fire and play the guitar! It is absolutely great! People stay up until the fire burns out. Of course, plum brandy and wine is drunk;) Many touristic resorts offer foreign visitors all of these!





mike111
Tuesday 22nd of January 2008 09:14:28 PM
In America also, men usually cook on the barbecue. I always felt that it was because we get to play with an open fire! :).


Lina
Friday 25th of April 2008 10:51:27 PM
Să vă dau şi eu o reţetă:D Este o specialitate tradiţională de Paşti!

Lamb tripe/Drob de miel

Ingredients/Ingrediente

- 500 grams of lamb and liver/carne de miel şi ficat
- 2 eggs/2 ouă
- 1 loaf of bread/o felie de pâine
- 1 tablespoon of sour cream/1 linguriţă de smântână
- 1 bunch of parsley finely chopped/o legătură de pătrunjel tocat mărunt
- 2 onions/2 cepe
- salt and pepper/sare şi piper

Method/Mod de preparare

- first boil and then, with the knife, thinly chop the meat and the liver
- add the eggs, the loaf of bread and the other ingredients
- put everything in a pot and cook in the oven over medium heat
- the mixture may be folded in dough made from 1 egg, 150 grams of flour and 1 tablespoon of oil






becky
Sunday 15th of June 2008 02:45:20 AM
Stuffed peppers! I can't believe nobody has mentioned stuffed peppers on this thread! Sadly I don't have a recipe to share with you all. The first time I heard about stuffed peppers, my Romanian friend pronounced it 'stuffed papers' which had me very confused!

And what about some sweet things? Papanaşi! This is a sort of doughnut dessert, but made with cheese, and garnished with smăntâna and dulceaza (fruit syrup). It's a rather heavy dessert, but if you remember to save some room for it, it's a fantastic treat.

Ciorba (soups) of all kinds are also favourite foods in Romania. The influence of all the Romanian cooking I have sampled has actually caused my to turn on my stove over the winter in an attempt to devise my own versions of ciorba, although previously I was famous for avoiding the kitchen.

Romania also has an inexhaustible supply of fine beers and wines to try. In England I would never touch brown beers (perhaps because we have a revolting habit of serving them warm), but in Romania I love Şapte Colina, and others. I live fairly close to the Cotnari vineyards where they make a sweet white dessert wine that is like nectar!


mike111
Sunday 15th of June 2008 12:45:24 PM
I love stuffed peppers though until now, it never occurred to me that they might be eastern europe in origin. Thanks for mentioning it.

I don't know how anyone can drink beer warm. Germany does that to and I'm sure others too. I love beer but it has to be cold. Hmmm, suddenly I am very thirsty. Too bad it is 1:45 am :(.


becky
Monday 16th of June 2008 02:12:42 AM
I know :( It's a bit of a failing we have as a country I think! Although if any 'real-ale' campaigners saw me writing that, they'd have something to say!

We drink blond beers cold - lager and so on. But milds, ales, and bitters are served at room temperature. I'm not an expert though - I could stand to be corrected!


zeering
Monday 16th of June 2008 04:48:33 AM
Ohhhh, it may have been a mistake for me to finally click on this thread...

Okay, so what is the Romanian term for "stuffed peppers"?

And now I am going to have to educate myself about brown vs light beers & serving temperatures, as well as these Cotnari vineyards mentioned above.

The photos you people are posting with the recipes have spoiled me forever. I am now convinced that my first visit to Romania must be planned for considerably longer than just a couple of weeks, and am rejiggling my schedule etc accordingly.

The mititei, the drob de miel...oh my God. And that papanaşi...I am drooling at the thought of having it melt in my mouth.

Is the plum brandy a special Romanian variety/method of preparation, too?


mike111
Monday 16th of June 2008 09:28:17 AM
You and me both! :D

When are you planning to go?


zeering
Tuesday 17th of June 2008 12:30:18 AM
Originally posted by mike111You and me both! :D

When are you planning to go?

Nu stiu, acum; poate maine. ;p
(I don't know, now; maybe tomorrow.)

Vreau să fie capabil să rămână suficient de lungă pentru a vedea o schimbare de sezoane.
(I want to be able to stay long enough to see a change of seasons.)

Poate cã va arata intr-un apartament de inchiriere undeva.
(Maybe I will look into renting an apartment somewhere.)


becky
Tuesday 17th of June 2008 04:31:45 AM
Well, I can highly recommend Iaşi for a visit. It is off the beaten track of the Dracula trail which is popular for many visitors, and not in the mountain area, which is very beautiful and also worth visiting. But Iaşi is in the region of Moldavia, famous for its fabulous painted monasteries, and only a stone's throw from Moldova if you wanted to tick off another country on your visit. The city itself has some very beautiful churches, and the fabulous (though rather overstated!) Palace of Culture, which is sadly closed for renovation right now, although still very impressive from the outside. And I can recommend a restaurant that does fabulous papanaşi! :)


becky
Tuesday 17th of June 2008 04:33:12 AM
And I think stuffed peppers are 'ardei umplut' - something like that anyway!


mike111
Tuesday 17th of June 2008 05:26:40 AM
Originally posted by zeeringOriginally posted by mike111You and me both! :D

When are you planning to go?

Nu stiu, acum; poate maine. ;p
(I don't know, now; maybe tomorrow.)

Vreau să fie capabil să rămână suficient de lungă pentru a vedea o schimbare de sezoane.
(I want to be able to stay long enough to see a change of seasons.)

Poate cã va arata intr-un apartament de inchiriere undeva.
(Maybe I will look into renting an apartment somewhere.)

I've looked into short-term apartments in Bucureşti. They were pretty reasonable though I don't remember the average cost.


daniela
Wednesday 25th of June 2008 09:15:25 PM
I do not know the price of apartments in Bucharest but
I think at least 150 euros
Nu ştiu preţurile apartamentelor în Bucureşti, dar trebuie să fie cel puţin 150 euro

Romanian recipes coming
Apar şi reţetele

I love salads , so...
Îmi plac salatele, deci...

Here is one salad recipe:
Urmează o reţetă de salată:

Salata de ardei copti
Ingrediente:
1,5 kg ardei gras, 1 kg rosii, 150 ml ulei, 1 leg. marar verde, 75 ml otet, 30 g sare.

Preparare:
Se coc ardeii pe plita incinsa. Dupa ce s-au copt se aseaza in castron, se presara sare si se mentin acoperiti pina ce se racesc. Se curata de coaja si se spala, apoi se adauga uleiul, otetul, sarea si se amesteca. Se portioneaza cite doua bucati la portie. Se asaza in salatiera; deasupra se pun rosiile taiate rondele si marar taiat marunt. Sosul rezultat se toarna in fiecare salatiera.
Timp Preparare: 1 h
Complexitate: medie


No English, only Romanian. I know you will manage because you know Romanian very well






daniela
Wednesday 25th of June 2008 09:17:13 PM


What other recipes would you like to know?
Ce alte reţete mai vreţi să ştiţi?

Daniela


mike111
Thursday 31st of July 2008 12:24:32 AM
Hey!!! I finally found a Romanian Resturaunt in NY! It is in Long Island, NY which is a bit of a hassle to get to, but maybe I'll go to check it out one of these days. Too bad this isn't closer to where I work.

http://acasany.com/menu.php?news_id=6&start=0&category_id=&parent_id=&arcyear=&arcmonth=


daniela
Thursday 31st of July 2008 04:17:50 AM
Originally posted by mike111Hey!!! I finally found a Romanian Resturaunt in NY! It is in Long Island, NY which is a bit of a hassle to get to, but maybe I'll go to check it out one of these days. Too bad this isn't closer to where I work.

http://acasany.com/menu.php?
news_id=6&start=0&category_id=&parent_id=&arcyear=&arcmonth=


Wow! Wonderful! I can hardly wait for you to visit the place and tell us how it was. It is a good chance for you to practise your Romanian.




daniela
Thursday 31st of July 2008 04:24:49 AM



Apropo, fiind vară, ce salate mai mâncaţi?
Eu prefer salata de roşii, ardei gras, ceapă şi castraveţi.
Poate şi salate de vinete, dar mai ales de ardei copţi.

Salata de castraveţi cu usturoi e grozavă, ştiaţi? Cu puţin oţet de mere, ulei şi puţină apă.



mike111
Friday 01st of August 2008 04:08:25 AM
Bună Daniela, I tried to translate your post. How did I do?

quote by daniela
Apropo, fiind vară, ce salate mai mâncaţi?
Eu prefer salata de roşii, ardei gras, ceapă şi castraveţi.
Poate şi salate de vinete, dar mai ales de ardei copţi.

Salata de castraveţi cu usturoi e grozavă, ştiaţi? Cu puţin oţet de mere, ulei şi puţină apă.

By the way, being summer, what salad (mai) you eat? I prefer red salad, pepper (gras), onion and cucumber. Maybe salad, but (mai) choice ripe pepper.

The Cucumber Salad with garlic is awful, you know?. With a little apple vinegar, oil and some water.


daniela
Saturday 02nd of August 2008 12:07:56 AM


Ce drăguţ!
How nice!

By the way, being summer, what salad do you still eat? I prefer tomato salad with green peppers, onion and cucumbers. Maybe aubergine salad, but especially baked green pepper salad.

The Cucumber Salad with garlic is great, you know?. With a little apple vinegar, oil and a little bit of water.





mike111
Saturday 02nd of August 2008 01:34:31 AM
Not too bad. I relied much on dictionare.com though. I'm getting better though. :D I had a feeling that grozavă was not "awful", but that made sense from the other options from dictionare. Thanks for the correction :).

Can you explain "mai" (...ce salate mai mâncaţi?) a little please? I am not understanding how this guides the sentence to say "...what salad do you still eat?"

Mulţumesc,
Mike


daniela
Saturday 02nd of August 2008 02:03:57 AM


You are doing very well. Excellent.

'Mai' means the following: when summer comes salads are very popular and the most common salads are the ones I told you about. I used the word 'mai' to say apart from these salads what other new salads do you eat, what else.

So 'mai' could be 'other' or 'else'.

I am sorry about 'still'. It wasn't the best idea.




mike111
Saturday 02nd of August 2008 02:34:04 AM
Thanks for the explanation. I see on dictionare.com when I search English->Romanian for "else", mai is returned as an adverb. This makes sense. Thanks again! :)


daniela
Sunday 03rd of August 2008 01:53:29 AM



Cu plăcere
You are welcome

'Mai' este adverb
'Mai' is an adverb

Ai dreptate.
You are right


You are mostly welcome





mike111
Monday 04th of August 2008 05:58:53 PM
So, aside from apple vinegar and oil, what other salad dressings are popular in romania?


Lina
Tuesday 05th of August 2008 12:08:00 AM

Mike, I haven't seen this link until now! It would be great for you to try Romanian cuisine. The Menu sounds good!
I recommend you "Beef soup", "Beans with smoked pork", "Stuffed cabbage rolls" and "Fried Cheese Donuts".

Mike, nu am văzut această adresă până acum. Ar fi grozav să încerci bucătăria românească. Meniul arată bine;)
Îţi recomand Supa de văcuţă, Fasole cu ciolan, Sarmale în foi de varză, Papanaşi.

Poftă bună!


Originally posted by mike111Hey!!! I finally found a Romanian Resturaunt in NY! It is in Long Island, NY which is a bit of a hassle to get to, but maybe I'll go to check it out one of these days. Too bad this isn't closer to where I work.

http://acasany.com/menu.php?news_id=6&start=0&category_id=&parent_id=&arcyear=&arcmonth=


Lina
Tuesday 05th of August 2008 01:04:53 AM

Mike, te-ai descurcat foarte bine!


Originally posted by mike111Bună Daniela, I tried to translate your post. How did I do?

quote by daniela
Apropo, fiind vară, ce salate mai mâncaţi?
Eu prefer salata de roşii, ardei gras, ceapă şi castraveţi.
Poate şi salate de vinete, dar mai ales de ardei copţi.

Salata de castraveţi cu usturoi e grozavă, ştiaţi? Cu puţin oţet de mere, ulei şi puţină apă.

By the way, being summer, what salad (mai) you eat? I prefer red salad, pepper (gras), onion and cucumber. Maybe salad, but (mai) choice ripe pepper.

The Cucumber Salad with garlic is awful, you know?. With a little apple vinegar, oil and some water.


mike111
Tuesday 05th of August 2008 04:11:48 AM
Bună Lina, Thanks for the menu tips. When I find time to go, I was going to ask you Romanians for suggestions.


mike111
Tuesday 05th of August 2008 11:42:52 PM
Great news! I was wrong about the location of the Romanian Restaurant. It is only about a 25 minute subway ride for me in Queens! I'm planning to go in a couple weeks with some friends from work. I hope I am confident enough to talk in Romanian! It will be my first attempt saying Romanian words with someone who might understand. I worry about my accent. Hopefully it wont sound like gibberish. :(


daniela
Wednesday 06th of August 2008 01:36:40 AM


Mike,

este grozav.
it is great.


Sa nu iti faci griji pentru pronuntie. Vorbeste si gata.
Te vei descurca minunat.

Do not worry about pronunciation. Just speak. You are going to be great.


Abia astept sa ne spui ce succes ai avut.
I can hardly wait for you to tell us of your success there.




mike111
Wednesday 06th of August 2008 04:37:00 AM
Thanks for the vote of confidence Daniela. I hope you are right.


Lina
Thursday 14th of August 2008 02:16:09 AM
Mike, you must be confident! Don't think at the accent. Give your order, eat:D and try to make a conversation!


mike111
Thursday 14th of August 2008 02:49:08 AM
Another discouraging thing that I notice is that even if I know what I want to say in my mind, it doesn't come out right because I am not used to verbally saying a given word. An example would be the word "foarte". I had the hardest time spitting this out one day. Even today, I need to say it a few times before being satisfied with its sound. Plus the rolled 'r' is something that I have never needed with English. Some days it sounds great, others it doesn't. I just need to work at this more and more but I'll get it.


daniela
Thursday 14th of August 2008 04:49:23 AM


It is just a 'r'
Don't worry


mike111
Tuesday 19th of August 2008 09:33:56 AM
Well, I've completed eating my first romanian meal. I had the stuffed grape leaves which were outstanding and then finished off with the fried donuts with jam. I was more than pleased with my meal. I had built up enough courage to talk romanian. I felt confident. I was ready. The place wasn't too packed either which I thought was perfect. I opened by asking the waitress what part of romania is she from in english. She said, the capital and walked away immediately. I lost my momentum in an instant. I was devistated. I lost my opprotunity. Oh well, I'll have to prepare better for next time. At least I ate good food! :)


mike111
Tuesday 19th of August 2008 06:50:12 PM
And also..I remembered what everyone had said and that really helped me gain the confidence. Thank you all for the support. Next time I will speak romanian.


anda
Tuesday 19th of August 2008 09:23:40 PM
You go, Mike!!! It's great what you've been saying here. It's like I can't hardly wait for you to get another chance at speaking Romanian.
You know, I suggest you start with a Romanian line next time, something like: Ce e bun aici?(What's good here?) sau Ce bine îmi pare să fiu din nou aici(I'm so glad to be here again).
I don't know how the people at the restaurant will react (hopefully well), but I must admit I find it quite flattering when a foreigner addresses me in my own language.


mike111
Tuesday 19th of August 2008 11:07:33 PM
Thanks so much Anda. I can't wait either. I don't know when I will go back. Eventually. Next time I will start out with something in Romanian.


daniela
Sunday 24th of August 2008 04:33:03 AM


Ai putea începe cu 'bună ziua'
You could start by saying 'bună ziua'


Când mergi a doua oară, ai putea spune 'Mi-a plăcut mâncarea dumneavoastră foarte mult'
When you go there the second time, you could say 'I liked your food very much'

Do you know the names of the dishes you ate?
Ştii cum se numesc felurile pe care lea-i mâncat?

Cum le numesc ei?
How they call them?

Sărmăluţe în foi de viţă,cumva?
şi gogoşi cu gem?






mike111
Tuesday 26th of August 2008 11:42:02 PM
I don't remember what they were called. But the stuffed grape leaves were delicious as was the "gogoşi cu gem". Two huge pieces covered in a sweet sauce and jam on top. I couldn't finish the second one.

I wanted to ask... They had an item on the menu that said "brains". I'm guessing that it is lamb brains. Can someone tell me how this tastes? I've never eaten this before.


anda
Tuesday 26th of August 2008 11:51:35 PM
It could also be pork or veal brains.
If it is fried in a pan with eggs then it's pretty good. I'm not familiar with other way of cooking it.


daniela
Saturday 30th of August 2008 03:16:33 AM


What you call 'gogoşi' might also be 'papanaşi'. They contain fresh cow cheese, flour and eggs.

The brain is very good. But you have to be careful so it is fresh. It is delicate and it might go bad very quickly.
Ask them in a low voice so they will not get upset and worried about their business. I am suggesting this so you can get the answer you need. This is how I do it in restaurants.

But if it is ok and cooked well, it is very very good, nice, tasty.



mike111
Tuesday 02nd of September 2008 08:43:33 PM
Actually, last week I spoke to someone else about this and they said to make sure it is fresh too. Thanks for the advice. I will try this next time if it is fresh.


daniela
Saturday 13th of September 2008 01:52:36 AM


Mike, you can cook it yourself. You can buy the brain, but make really really sure it is fresh when you buy it and when you arrive home with it.

You have to steam it or boil it a little so the thin film that covers it, can be pilled.
Then you fry it , for example. If you are interested in the details , I can read the recipe in the recipe book and translate it for you.

It will be fried after you cover the piece in a mixture of egg and flour.






mike111
Monday 15th of September 2008 09:20:16 PM
Thanks Daniela,

I'd love to try to cook it, but honestly... I don't have the slightest idea where to buy it. There are no American dishes which include the brain. I'll ask around though. Someone must know.


daniela
Sunday 28th of September 2008 11:04:54 PM


Maybe a place where you can buy meat. Poate de unde cumperi carne.


daniela
Wednesday 05th of August 2009 07:16:48 PM
Originally posted by daniela

Maybe a place where you can buy meat. Poate de unde cumperi carne.

Bună,

Aş vrea să mânânc legume la grătar. Am auzit că sunt bune.Ce gust au? Cât timp trebuie lăsate la grătar? Orice legume?

I would like to eat grilled vegetables. I heard that they were tasty. What is their taste? How long do they need to be ready? Any kind of vegetables?


Daniela


mike111
Sunday 09th of August 2009 01:28:56 PM
Yes, any type of vegetable can be grilled. I ate grilled zucchini today actually. Each vegetable has it's own taste. I usually take them off of the grill sometime before they burn. It's very hard to over-cook them unless you fall asleep while cooking. And you can under-cook them according to taste. I don't know how to explain how long to cook them for. Use your judgment, that's what I do.

I sometimes put the vegetables in a bag or a dish with some oil (i like olive oil, but anything is fine) over them before with some rosemary, parsley, oregano or anything else I'm in the mood for. Some salt and pepper, maybe raw or cooked fresh garlic. I let the veggies sit in there for a bit before cooking.



mike111
Sunday 09th of August 2009 01:29:34 PM
Yes, any type of vegetable can be grilled. I ate grilled zucchini today actually. Each vegetable has it's own taste. I usually take them off of the grill sometime before they burn. It's very hard to over-cook them unless you fall asleep while cooking. And you can under-cook them according to taste. I don't know how to explain how long to cook them for. Use your judgment, that's what I do.

I sometimes put the vegetables in a bag or a dish with some oil (i like olive oil, but anything is fine) over them before with some rosemary, parsley, oregano or anything else I'm in the mood for. Some salt and pepper, maybe raw or cooked fresh garlic. I let the veggies sit in there for a bit before cooking.



daniela
Friday 28th of August 2009 09:54:45 PM
Ce de reţete. Mi-e foame numai când le văd. Am fiert porumb!!!Eeeee!!!

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