Romanian Romanian Traditions Celebrate Like A Romanian!

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zeering
Monday 10th of December 2007 02:22:52 PM
Romanian Traditions: I thought this thread might be helpful for several reasons, it being the holiday season & all, including a chance for some exposure to a bit of Romanian Yuletide tradition as well as some useful words & phrases pertinent to the time of year.

For example, "Cracuin Fericit" means "Merry Christmas" in Romanian; I discovered that, as well as many other interesting things, here: http://www.ehow.com/how_10785_celebrate-romanian-christmas.html , including that "Mos Cracuin" is the romaneste for Santa Claus.

What got me to that site was a search for information about St. Nicholas Day, which is December 6, and marks the "official" beginning of the season. I like the part about leaving gifts in the boots or shoesmy Romanian friend was fretting until the last minute about what to get to put in her Mama & Tata's bootsI wish it were included in the general American way of doing things.

And maybe that page at ehow, in the comments section, might be an apt spot to thrown in an "ad" for this site as well as make a relevant contribution about Cracuin Romaneste-style?

Next, I found this while searching for colinde (Romanian Christmas carols) to listen to:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s5l3DQR286o

"On Christmas Eve, groups of children or men go to the
other village houses and sing traditional carols named
colinde. These carols have kept until our days the
oldest form of the Romanian folk poetry. These songs
communicate wishes of health, good harvests, handsome
young men and beautiful working girls, marriages,
success in various occupations the major problems of
the peasant's life.

The name of colinda comes from the Latin calendae. At
Romans, the calendae were the first days of each
month. Calendae Ianuarii marked the beginning of the
new administrative year. On this occasion, wishes were
sent, gifts were given and the future was predicted.
In the Eastern Roman Empire especially, people
disguised themselves."

Lastly, on December 1 Romania celebrated Ziua Nationala and one of my friends who lives in Bucharest attended this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XbzpGWPlmYE&feature=related in the Piata Unirii, which I thought was pretty cool.


mike111
Tuesday 11th of December 2007 11:34:32 AM
Great links zeering! That was some spectacular fireworks show. We have some pretty good firework shows over here in Pennsylvania for the 4th of July and so forth. But the one thing that it lacks, which I now understand is music! As in the youtube link.


Lina
Wednesday 12th of December 2007 06:34:34 PM
Hi zeering, I'm glad to see again!

What I find extraordinary is the fact that we, Romanians, keep alive our customs. Everything is passed on from generation to generation and I am certain we will never give them up!
Customs are exceptionally beautiful! Indeed, on the night of 5th December, children prepare their boots, get them cleaned and make them shine. Boots must look sharp, because St. Nicholas will place the presents inside them. Meanwhile parents go through a real spectacle trying to set everything in order.
When I was child I used to fear St. Nicholas. He has a stick with him!! Children must recite a poem, and I used to shake when it was my turn to say the poem:) Good children receive presents; bad children don’t!
As they grow up, around the age of 8 or 9, children find out that Santa is only a legend. You can’t even imagine the disappointment and how upset children get.
Anyhow, the tradition goes on. Even as grown-ups, they still receive gifts and prepare their boots. Later on, they will organize everything for their children and this is how the tradition lives on!
There are so many stories to tell! Next time I will tell you about how we carol since very young and what carols mean to Romanians!





Lina
Thursday 13th of December 2007 04:57:20 PM
zeering, please correct the thread's title "Cr?ciun Fericit" and try to giving some details in the "description" field.
I would like everyone to share with us the Christmas traditions specific to their country. Thanks:)




zeering
Thursday 20th of December 2007 02:17:00 PM
Hi Lina, you know I changed the thread title's spelling but I did want to point out that the words are spelled differently depending on where I lookfor example it is 'Craciun' at http://www.dictionare.com/english/dictionary.htm so I'm not really sure which is correct.

I have found this on many occasions, especially when trying to follow chats or read blogs written in Romanianspellings are often very, um, "unstandardized" might be one way to put it, ;) .


Lina
Sunday 23rd of December 2007 03:31:54 AM
I know, I have found on different sites the incorrect spelling for the word Cr?ciun, also. Don't worry, I have changed the title already!


zeering
Sunday 23rd of December 2007 02:28:12 PM
(Multumesc foarte mult, Lina.)

Craciun foarte fericit si An Nou Fericit to all.

http://www.miscarea.net/posteuca-poveste-de-craciun.htm

http://i159.photobucket.com/albums/t122/buckvault1/_craciun_fericit_01.gif

Jack


Lina
Sunday 23rd of December 2007 05:37:29 PM
Jack, este foarte frumoas? povestea de Cr?ciun ?i felicitarea!


Pentru c? mâine este vremea colindelor vreau s? v? introduc în atmosfera de basm specific? în aceasta perioad? la români.

http://www.crestinortodox.ro/Datiniobiceiuri-si-superstitii.html

http://www.crestinortodox.ro/Colinde

http://www.crestinortodox.ro/colinde_audio.html


http://www.romanianvoice.com/culture/colinde/index.php



Christmas traditions and customs


Winter holidays induce a certain fairy atmosphere for Romanians. During this time of year, especially in the countryside, customs are well preserved. One of the most common customs is caroling. Hereby, on Christmas Eve troops of carolers, dressed up in traditional costumes, wish health, happiness and good fortune, the fulfillment of every desire for the year to come.
Since very small, children carol and learn by heart these extraordinary beautiful carols. It is said that anyone who does not welcome carolers in his house will experience misfortune and hardships the following year.


Besides religious carols, one can enjoy some secular carols that have survived along the years: Capra, Ursul, Calutii. These are actually dances and people performing them wear masks and special costumes. The idea is to make mockery of negative characters existent inside this medium.

Comparative-historian researches have been undertaken related to the contents and phraseology of Christmas carols and Vedic hymns. Taking into consideration Romanian carols as a whole, one can associate them with Indian dharma (the unwritten Indian religious law) when performed in public.

When discussing carols, Al. Rosetti himself explained that Romanian language adopted a Latin term calendae. This term has been preserved till nowadays in the north-west of Ardeal and conserves the original phonetic aspect : corinda, a corinda and corindatori. Corinda comes from carinda, mixed with colinda, from Slavic.
The presence of carindar in Dacian-Roman language confirms the existence of carinda. In addition, one may clearly observe that terms such as carinda - corinda, corindatori, carindar, connected to Christmas, are still preserved nowadays, these terms come from Dacian-Roman period, before the common Slavic epoch. Carinda-corinda is also associated to another Dacian-Roman term lerui - Lord, ler the liturgical refrain sang in corinde. This refrain emerged from the Hebraic Halleluiah (give praise to the Lord), transposed in Latin into alleluia. By transforming, alleluia has become alleruia, leruia, shorten lerui, ler.


The etymology of Christmas is one of the most debated in Roman linguistics. So far a general agreement hasn't been attained. Latest studies led to the conclusion that two Latin terms: calatio and creatio are entitled to explain the origin of the word Christmas, taking into account both form as well as meaning.


During New Year’s Eve, one can hear the well-wishing known as Plugusorul, usually associated with hope of fertility:

May you house be your home
May your table be plenty
And may the following year
Find you blossoming
As apples
As pears
In mid summer
As rich autumn
Which is self-sufficient.


The custom of Plugusor reveals an archaic legendary fact: the effort of emperor Traian (villager Traian) to augment to the maximum agriculture in conquered Dacia, which had to become Roman Empire's garner. It is considered a mythical legend transposed in verse. Plugusorul celebrates the benefits of intensive wheat planting - a Roman habit, instead of mash planting that used to dominate Dacian cereal cultivation at the beginning of our era. Plugusorul unfolds the tradition of wheat cultivation.


Dintodeauna, in seara de ajun, poarta casei mele este tot timpul deschis? ?i colindatorii vin s? ne colinde pân? la miezul noptii! Sunt foarte fericit? s?-i primesc ?i s?-i ascult. Este cel mai frumos obicei al nostru!


?i acum primi?i în dar colinda mea preferat?!

http://www.crestinortodox.ro/Asculta__Deschide_usa_crestine-1182.html


Cr?ciun fericit tuturor!


Lina












mike111
Tuesday 15th of January 2008 08:54:15 PM
I must apologize, I had written this a couple weeks ago and saved it on my desktop without ever posting it.

Those are wonderful custom Lina. It is hard to follow such a well written post! ;)

In America, Christmas, at least to me, does not as interesting and traditional as it sounds in Romania. Most people spend horrifying amounts of money on gifts for people who, shamefully in my opinion, often return for something else. I don't intend to sound so negative about it, but that sums up its reality.

On the lighter-side, Christmas Eve is an exciting day for children. The idea of Santa Clause is every bit magical to them. Awaking on Christmas Day very early to run downstairs to see the decorated Christmas Tree packed with presents. They rip at the wrapping paper with such innocent glee to see each surprise.

Christmas Day is generally spent with family for food, drink and great company also with family and friends you might not get the chance to see frequently. Also a chance for people to exchange presents with one another.

I'm not sure about the rest of the country, but New Years Eve on the east coast watches the "ball" drop every year at Time Square in NYC. The countdown of the last 10 seconds of the year are usually followed by banging of pots by children and Happy New Years greetings between everyone. We don't have big firework shows but random households typically fire off smaller ones.


Dominick_Korshanyenko
Wednesday 16th of January 2008 05:54:21 AM
Christmas for me is really wonderful! I enjoyed hearing about what is done in Romania. My family does give gifts to eachother but usually because of my sister and I (who are the world conscientous ones in the family) bring many new traditions to do every year. Some different traditions we do are:

- We make a Roscón de Reyes (Cake of Kings). These cakes are made in honor of the three magi kings that visited Jesus. Every person takes a slice of cake until there is none left. Hidden in one of the pieces is a doll or figurine. If you find it then you are declared king or queen of the party and must host the next party next Christmas. (I got this tradition from Spain)

- Some years we also go caroling. Although this is done in many countries that makes it no less special here. I'm afraid that America has no traditional costumes, but we are happy just to spread the joy of the season.

- Unfortunately in Florida we don't have snow at Christmas but we make up for it by going ice skating every year in downtown where a large and beautiful tree is set up twinkling in the night sky.

- Also my sister and I play traditional Christmas songs from many countries as well as ours on the piano, oboe, saxophone, etc. Christmas is particularly special to me because I get to see all of my family and have some of the greatest times of the year.

- Probably the most silly tradition we have is every year a special present is bought usually chocolate or food. This present is wrapped in at least 15 layers of paper. Everyone sits in a circle and takes out a pair of dice and a pair of mittens. One person tries to open the gift with the mittens on and the others try to roll doubles on the dice. Everytime doubles are rolled the gift and the mittens are passed on until someone opens it and wins.

Besides these and countless more that we try (I just mentioned the usual ones) we do all of the regular things American families do on Christmas. We hang stockings, we decorate our house with lights, candles, holly, nutcrackers, bells, and other decorations, and we wrap gifts to give to eachother on Christmas day.

Oh, and I guess this isn't Christmas related but its close! I have several Jewish friends as well who celebrate Chanukka. I find it really interesting to go to their houses and watch as they light the menorah, say the three blessings, and play the dreidel game.

For New Years my family sets off hundreds of fireworks over the calm lakes of Florida. We also go to many parties in homes, picnics in parks, and celebrations on the beaches. We like Mike always watch the ball drop and toast wine(grape juice for me) for good luck in the coming year. We usually eat BBQ, hamburgers, hotdogs, chips, and all of the other junk food that America has come to love. The final thing we do in the year though is to make resolutions(goals) for the new year. We write them down and lock them away for a year so that on December 31 we can see if we kept our promises to ourselves or completely forgot.

The entire winter season to me is the most beautiful thing int he world. It is the only time it's EVER cold in Florida it is full of happiness brought by holidays like Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's. I truly would not trade it for anything in the world.

I wish everyone had a wonderful Christmas and a great new year to come.


mike111
Wednesday 16th of January 2008 08:49:44 AM
Very nice post Kenny. Though I can assure you something you probably already know; Wine goes over much better than grape juice for the holidays! ;)

It always interests me how, although we are American, how different we celebrate the holidays. Many of the customs that your family do are things I have never heard of. May I ask what origin your family is?

Mike


Dominick_Korshanyenko
Wednesday 16th of January 2008 09:05:55 AM
I'm two generations of American on both sides. Beyond that my Dad's side is Brittish as far back as possible and my mother's side is Slovak as far back as possible.

Not much variety huh? :ha

But to give you an idea my family loves to keep traditions and borrow others. My mom still knows how to make my family's favorite Slovak dishes halupki and halushki.


mike111
Wednesday 16th of January 2008 11:56:03 AM
I love halupkis! Halushkis too, although I didn't know that that is what it was called until a quick google search.


Lina
Wednesday 16th of January 2008 04:33:52 PM

Halupki and halushki!In what language are you speaking?/In ce limba vorbiti%}
I particularly like this thread!It's very interesting and funny what you have written!

It would be great if we'll talk here about all traditions during the year. Soon, we'll celebrate an old tradition : Babele(old women). I'll post what I know about this subject.

Tell me, please, if you think it is necessary to translate in Romanian these articles. We can do the translation together.
We can post in both languages all the articles about customs in Phrasebase Blog, which has more traffic. What do you think?








Dominick_Korshanyenko
Wednesday 16th of January 2008 06:00:09 PM
It doesn't surprise me that you know what htey are Mike the part of Pennslyvania that you live in is full of tons of Eastern European Immigrants.

And Lina It's slovak. ;)

I'd be glad to talk about other traditions, etc. I can't wait to learn about Babele.

Kenny


mike111
Thursday 17th of January 2008 09:23:46 PM
I'm sensing a new thread...


Lina
Saturday 19th of January 2008 04:29:35 PM

Ei Kenny, dac? m? gândesc de unde vii de fapt, înteleg de ce ?tii s? faci de toate, bine ?i repede;)Glumesc, dar ce mic? e lumea!

The largest community of Slovaks in Romania is the little town named Nadlac, located in the west of Romania, 50 km from Arad, where I live. Nadlac is the gate to enter Romania, next to the Hungarian border. In Nadlac live 8000 people, but more than half are Slovaks, more than Romanians.
I know a Slovak family. They speak Slovak at home, even the youngest have a specific accent when they speak Romanian!
The Slovaks keep their old traditions and customs and speak their language.
An old custom has been kept till nowadays. At the Evangelist church, four buglers announce what time it is.

Speaking of recipes, Slovaks have a tasteful traditional salami, but no one knows the recipe! They keep it a secret.
It is a salami that is good to eat all year long. It is an ancient recipe, send from generation to generation. Each butcher knows the secret of how to conserve and prepare it. This particular salami is prepared in November with sweet and peppery paprika, caraway, salt, pepper, and fresh pork only.


Dominick_Korshanyenko
Monday 21st of January 2008 11:01:17 AM
Cool Lina! I've never heard of Nadlac before but that's awesome that its mostly Slovak. I really would like to speak Slovak but there aren't many resources for it and I am already learning too many languages. ;)


"located in the west of Romania, 50 km from Arad, where I live"

:ha that took me a while to realize that 50 kilometers is about 31 miles!

Este adev?rat! Ce mic? e lumea! Although I wish it was small enough that I could walk to Romania! ;)


Lina
Wednesday 23rd of January 2008 02:24:02 PM

Ai dreptate(right), prea(too)multe limbi deodat?(at once).

Dac?(if)vrei s? vizitezi România, într-o zi(one day)se va întampla asta(it will happen):)

Da, m?sur?torile(measures)sunt altfel(different). Avem pentru greutate(weight)gram, pentru distan??(distance)metru, pentru volum(volume)litru, pentru temperatur? grade(degrees) Celsius.


Dominick_Korshanyenko
Sunday 27th of January 2008 07:11:16 AM
:)

I know all about the metric system it just surprises every time I see someone use it automatically. I'm used to everywhere seeing things in feet, miles, cups, pounds, farenheit, etc. It just proves how stubborn America is. Did you know America has tried many times to switch to the metruc system and every single time the people voted against it?

Da, vreau s? vizitez România! Dar nu pot acum! Poate pot a convinge p?rin?i ai mei a c?l?tori acolo curând. :D


Lina
Saturday 23rd of February 2008 04:28:48 PM

Bun? tuturor:) Ce mai face?i? Sunte?i bine? Avem ceva de s?rb?torit!


I told you about "Babele". It is said that the Old Ladies are mean and bring snow, rain, dampness and cold. It is a celebration which usually lasts for 7 days. These days mark the end of winter and the beginning of spring.
It is a know fact that the weather in March is unpredictable. Therefore, people choose one of these 7 first days from March and if the weather is fine that particular day, it is considered that the whole year will be a good one, and vice-versa, if the weather is bad, than it is thought that the whole year will be a bad one:D

In order to celebrate like Romanians do, I'll have to ask you to pick a day between the first and the seventh of March. Afterwards, I'll tell you whether your "old lady" was good or bad.

I pick the 7th of March!




Lina
Saturday 23rd of February 2008 05:59:28 PM

Tomorrow we'll celebrate "Dragobete", the equivalent of Valentine's Day, the beginning of spring, feast of birds!

This celebration comes from a time when February was considered a spring month, and 24th of February meant the beginning of the agricultural year. Sometimes, the day when the bear comes out of its cave!
It is a unique moment, when nature awakens, birds look for a place to built nests, and people amplify this atmosphere by experiencing the same feelings.

Who is Dragobete? Dragobete is a mythological god, the same as Eros or Cupidon. He is considered to be the son of Dochia, a handsome but also a passionate man. He is not so gentle like St. Valentine!

Dragobete is the god of well-humor, plenty of parties being held on this particular day, providing chances for people to get to know one another, fell in love and eventually marry.

For Dacians, he is the cosmic godfather who officiates all weddings taking place between animals. The people assimilated the tradition. Like birds, on Dragobete's Day, girls and boys get together so that their love lasts the whole year. It is said that birds are the "messengers of gods/mesagerele zeilor", "messenger from the sky/mesagerul cerului"

In the countryside, there is a saying "Dragobete kisses girls/Dragobetele ?uc? fetele"

Which are the customs related to Dragobete? In the morning, dressed up in their best clothes, youngsters met in the middle of village or in the front of the church. They walked together towards the forests or plains, singing, looking for snowdrops and other miraculous plant, used for love incantations.
In the forest, around the fire, young boys and girls spend their time speaking. Girls pick up violas, which they kept at icons. Afterwards these flowers were used for love- spells. There were also places where girls collect snow or strawberry flowers. This water was later well taken care of because it was said that it had magical powers and could make girls more beautiful and more loving.
At lunch time, girls ran in the village. This running is called "flying". Each boy followed the girl he liked. If the boy was fast enough and the girl like the boy, a long kiss followed in front of everyone, symbolized their engagement.
In the afternoon the party was held. Everybody had to dance, sing and feel good, because it was said that those who did not celebrate Dragobete, won't find a partner for the year to come!

It was firmly believed that Dragobete protected and bear luck to those in loved, to youngsters in particular.
Dragobete is a real Romanian Cupidon!


Dominick_Korshanyenko
Sunday 24th of February 2008 02:26:42 AM
Wow Lina Babele and Dragobete sound wonderful. :)

I pick the 3rd of March!


Lina
Wednesday 27th of February 2008 06:24:53 PM
Well, it looks like Mike and Avaldi are afraid by superstitions;).
You have to know that Romanians have more traditions and superstitions! I would like to share all of them with you, even I'm not a superstition person:)
Anyhow, "Babele" haven't any connection with the vampires...of course, there is an ugly old lady called - Baba Cloan?a Cotoroan?a(cannot be translated) - who eats people:D, but this is another story!


Lina - 7 Martie
Kenny - 3 martie



mike111
Wednesday 27th of February 2008 06:52:00 PM
It's not so much the superstitions I am afraid of as much as it is the singing and dancing! :D


I rented a movie the other day that I wanted to recommend to students of Romanian language. The movie is called "12:08 East of Bucharest". It's a Romanian movie with english subtitles but what is beneficial is there were many very basic dialogs between characters which (with the subtitles) were quite easy to follow. I am not sure of the rating but the worst that I noticed was cursing.

Lina, have you seen this movie?


Lina
Saturday 01st of March 2008 07:45:25 PM
Originally posted by mike000It's not so much the superstitions I am afraid of as much as it is the singing and dancing! :D


I rented a movie the other day that I wanted to recommend to students of Romanian language. The movie is called \"12:08 East of Bucharest\". It's a Romanian movie with english subtitles but what is beneficial is there were many very basic dialogs between characters which (with the subtitles) were quite easy to follow. I am not sure of the rating but the worst that I noticed was cursing.

Lina, have you seen this movie?

No, I haven't seen the movie. After I'll watch the film we can discuss about it:)

Nu, nu am v?zut filmul. Dup? ce îl voi vedea putem discuta despre el.


Lina
Saturday 01st of March 2008 07:52:12 PM

1 Martie - Ziua Mar?i?orului

Today is a special day for us! We celebrate the arrival of spring in an unique way!

In the old Roman calendar, the 1st of March was the first day of the year and festivities called Matronalia were being held in the honor of Mars, the god of nature, spring and agriculture.

Many archeological findings from Romania revealed Mar?isoare as old as 8000 years. Small river stones painted in white and red. The red color of fire, blood and sun, was linked with life, therefore woman. The white was the color of the waters and clouds and associated to man's wisdom.

Iat? legenda m?r?i?orului...Odat? soarele coborî într-un sat, la hor?, luând chipul unui fecior. Un zmeu l-a pândit ?i l-a r?pit dintre oameni, închizându-l într-o temni??. Lumea se întristase. P?s?rile nu mai cântau, izvoarele nu mai curgeau, iar copiii nu mai râdeau. Nimeni nu îndr?znea s?-l înfrunte pe zmeu. Dar într-o zi, un tânar voinic s-a hotarât s? plece s? salveze soarele. Mul?i dintre p?mânteni l-au condus ?i i-au dat din puterile lor ca s?-l ajute s?-l biruie pe zmeu ?i s? elibereze soarele. Drumul lui a durat 3 anotimpuri: vara, toamna ?i iarna. A g?sit castelul zmeului ?i au început lupta. S-au înfruntat zile întregi pâna când zmeul a fost doborât. Sl?bit de puteri ?i r?nit, tânarul elibera Soarele. Acesta se ridica pe cer înveselind ?i bucurând lumea. A reînviat natura, oamenii s-au bucurat, dar viteazul n-a ajuns s? vad? primavara. Sângele cald din r?ni i s-a scurs în zapada. Pe când acesta se topea, r?s?reau flori albe, ghioceii, vestitorii prim?verii. Pâna ?i ultima pic?tura de sânge se scurse în z?pada imaculata. Muri. De atunci tinerii împletesc doi ciucura?i: unul alb ?i unul ro?u. Ei le ofera fetelor pe care le iubesc sau celor apropia?i. Ro?ul înseamn? dragoste pentru tot ce este frumos, amintind de culoarea sângelui voinicului. Albul simbolizeaza s?n?tatea ?i puritatea ghiocelului, prima floare a primaverii...



Aceste mar?isoare sunt lucrate manual din os, m?rgele sau ceramic?!
These "m?r?i?oare" are hand made from ceramics, bead and bone.












Lina
Monday 03rd of March 2008 02:27:27 PM
Originally posted by Dominick_Korshanyenko
I pick the 3rd of March!

Kenny, la sfâr?itul zilei î?i voi spune cum este vremea în ziua aleas? de tine! Zilele de 1 si 2 Martie au fost friguroase ?i ploioase, a b?tut vântul. Sper s? fie ast?zi mai frumos:)



mike111
Monday 03rd of March 2008 09:46:11 PM
Originally posted by LinaOriginally posted by mike000It's not so much the superstitions I am afraid of as much as it is the singing and dancing! :D


I rented a movie the other day that I wanted to recommend to students of Romanian language. The movie is called \\\"12:08 East of Bucharest\\\". It's a Romanian movie with english subtitles but what is beneficial is there were many very basic dialogs between characters which (with the subtitles) were quite easy to follow. I am not sure of the rating but the worst that I noticed was cursing.

Lina, have you seen this movie?

No, I haven't seen the movie. After I'll watch the film we can discuss about it:)

Nu, nu am vazut filmul. Dupa ce il voi vedea putem discuta despre el.

Lina, I believe the movie I mentioned above is called "A Fost Sau n-a Fost?" in Romania.


Lina
Monday 03rd of March 2008 11:15:50 PM
Originally posted by LinaOriginally posted by Dominick_Korshanyenko
I pick the 3rd of March!

Kenny, la sfâr?itul zilei î?i voi spune cum este vremea în ziua aleas? de tine! Zilele de 1 si 2 Martie au fost friguroase ?i ploioase, a b?tut vântul. Sper s? fie ast?zi mai frumos:)


Ei bine, ast?zi vremea a fost frumoas?. A fost o zi cald? ?i însorit?. Baba zilei este bun? ?i î?i aduce noroc!
Tradi?ia spune c? vei avea noroc tot anul:)


mike111
Tuesday 04th of March 2008 12:50:57 AM
What are some common greetings or expressions that Romanians use on this day? Ziua Martisorului Ferecit?


Dominick_Korshanyenko
Tuesday 04th of March 2008 10:04:31 AM
Originally posted by LinaOriginally posted by LinaOriginally posted by Dominick_Korshanyenko
I pick the 3rd of March!

Kenny, la sfarsitul zilei iti voi spune cum este vremea in ziua aleasa de tine! Zilele de 1 si 2 Martie au fost friguroase si ploioase, a batut vantul. Sper sa fie astazi mai frumos:)


Ei bine, astazi vremea a fost frumoasa. A fost o zi calda si insorita. Baba zilei este buna si iti aduce noroc!
Traditia spune ca vei avea noroc tot anul:)

Minunat! Vremea aici a fost frumoas? de asemenea. Trei prieteni ai mei au zi de na?tere la trei de mar?ie. Este un zi norocoas?, într-adev?r.

Wonderful! The weather here was beautiful too. Three of my friends have their birthdays on the third of March. It's a lucky day, indeed. ;)


Lina
Tuesday 04th of March 2008 01:39:43 PM


Lina, I believe the movie I mentioned above is called \"A Fost Sau n-a Fost?\" in Romania.

Da Mike, a?a este. Titlul se refer? la Revolu?ia din 1989, dac? a fost sau nu Revolu?ie în ora?ul Vaslui.


Lina
Wednesday 05th of March 2008 04:02:37 PM


Minunat! Vremea aici a fost frumoas? de asemenea. Trei prieteni ai mei au zi de na?tere la trei de mar?ie. Este un zi norocoas?, într-adev?r.

Wonderful! The weather here was beautiful too. Three of my friends have their birthdays on the third of March. It's a lucky day, indeed. ;)

Ce bine vorbe?ti române?te!


Lina
Thursday 06th of March 2008 02:24:01 AM
Originally posted by mike000What are some common greetings or expressions that Romanians use on this day? Ziua Martisorului Ferecit?

Obi?nuim s? spunem/We used to say :

1 Martie c?l?tor, î?i aduce un Mar?i?or!

Î?i doresc o primavar? frumoas?!

Î?i doresc un 1 Martie fericit!




Lina
Saturday 08th of March 2008 06:24:35 PM
Originally posted by LinaWell, it looks like Mike and Avaldi are afraid by superstitions;).
You have to know that Romanians have more traditions and superstitions! I would like to share all of them with you, even I'm not a superstition person:)
Anyhow, \"Babele\" haven't any connection with the vampires...of course, there is an ugly old lady called - Baba Cloan?a Cotoroan?a(cannot be translated) - who eats people:D, but this is another story!


Lina - 7 Martie
Kenny - 3 martie


I forgot to say that yesterday the weather was beautiful! It was nice and sunny!


mike111
Tuesday 22nd of April 2008 09:44:51 PM
Lina, I see that Ziua muncii is right around the corner. Can you tell us a little bit about what this holiday means for Romanians?

In america, we celebrate Labor Day on September 1.

From Wikipedia:

Culture

Labor Day has been celebrated on the first Monday in September in the United States since the 1880s. The form that the observance and celebration of Labor Day should take were outlined in the first proposal of the holiday — a street parade to exhibit to the public "the strength and esprit de corps of the trade and labor organizations" of the community, followed by a festival for the recreation and amusement of the workers and their families. This became the pattern for the celebrations of Labor Day. Speeches by prominent men and women were introduced later, as more emphasis was placed upon the economic and civic significance of the holiday. Still later, by a resolution of the American Federation of Labor convention of 1909, the Sunday preceding Labor Day was adopted as Labor Sunday and dedicated to the spiritual and educational aspects of the labor movement.

Today Labor Day is often regarded simply as a day of rest and, compared to the May 1 Labor Day celebrations in most countries, parades, speeches or political demonstrations are more low-key, although especially in election years, events held by labor organizations often feature political themes and appearances by candidates for office. Forms of celebration include picnics, barbecues, fireworks displays, water sports, and public art events. Families with school-age children take it as the last chance to travel before the end of summer. Some teenagers and young adults view it as the last weekend for parties before returning to school. However, of late, schools have begun well before Labor Day, as early as the 24th of July in many urban districts, including Nashville and Atlanta. In addition, Labor Day marks the beginning of the season for the National Football League and NCAA College Football. The NCAA usually plays their first games the weekend of Labor day, with the NFL playing their first game the Thursday following Labor Day.

Controversies

The Knights of Labor organized the original parade on Tuesday, September 5, 1882 in New York City. In 1884 another parade was held, and the Knights passed resolutions to make this an annual event. Other labor organizations (and there were many), but notably the affiliates of the International Workingmen's Association, many of whom were socialists or anarchists, favored a May 1 holiday. In 1886 came the general strike which eventually won the eight-hour workday in the United States. These events are today commemorated as Labor Day in virtually every country in the world, with the notable exceptions being the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. With the Chicago Haymarket riots in early May of 1886, President Grover Cleveland believed that commemorating Labor Day on May 1 could become an opportunity to commemorate the riots. Thus, fearing that it might strengthen the socialist movement, he quickly moved in 1887 to support the position of the Knights of Labor and their date for Labor Day.

Labor Day traditions

Since 1966, the annual telethon of the Muscular Dystrophy Association has been held on Labor Day weekend. The telethon, hosted by Jerry Lewis, raises tens of millions of dollars each year to fund research and patient support programs for the various diseases grouped as muscular dystrophy.

Labor Day weekend also marked the annual running of the Southern 500 at Darlington Raceway in Darlington, South Carolina. The race was run at any time during the weekend from 1950-2002. In 2004, NASCAR began racing on Labor Day weekend at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, California.

Chicago's Taste of Polonia, The city's largest Polish themed festival celebration of Polish cultural heritage, traditions, and customs on the grounds of the Copernicus Foundation in Jefferson Park. Bringing in crowds well over 30,000 each year, Taste of Polonia has welcomed notable guests such as President George H. Bush in 1992 and Vice-President Dick Cheney, Mrs. Tipper Gore, and Mrs. Hadassah Lieberman in 2000.

Boomsday, one of the biggest fireworks displays in the Southeastern United States, has been held annually on Labor Day since 1986 in Knoxville, Tennessee; it attracts over 350,000 spectators.

Popular fashion etiquette dictates that white should not be worn after Labor Day. Originally it was white shoes that were taboo— white or "winter white" clothing was acceptable. The custom is fading: "Fashion magazines are jumping on this growing trend, calling people who 'dare' to wear white after Labor Day innovative, creative, and bold. Slowly but surely, white is beginning to break free from its box, and is becoming acceptable to wear whenever one pleases. This etiquette is comparable to the Canadian fashion rule against wearing green after Remembrance Day. In the world of western attire, it is similarly tradition to wear a straw cowboy hat until Labor Day. After Labor Day, the felt hat is worn until Memorial Day."


Lina
Friday 25th of April 2008 01:31:39 AM

I have forgotten about this holiday. Thanks you have reminded me! I'll be back:)

Your article is very interesting. There are a lot of things that I didn't know and I've learned something new.


Lina
Saturday 26th of April 2008 03:19:02 PM

Well, we haven't so many beautiful memories about this holiday. During the communism, the authorities required that the 1st of May should be celebrated by organizing huge manifestations on important boulevards, with workers positioned in formations and shouting slogans and wearing communist placards. After 1990, the importance of the holiday diminished, people still celebrate the event by spending outdoor their free time, having picnics, taking delight in traditional food: cârn?ciori, mici ?i bere.




daniela
Saturday 05th of July 2008 03:14:58 AM
Originally posted by Lina
Well, we haven't so many beautiful memories about this holiday. During the communism, the authorities required that the 1st of May should be celebrated by organizing huge manifestations on important boulevards, with workers positioned in formations and shouting slogans and wearing communist placards. After 1990, the importance of the holiday diminished, people still celebrate the event by spending outdoor their free time, having picnics, taking delight in traditional food: cârn?ciori, mici ?i bere.



Tis is an international holiday, isn't it?



Lina
Saturday 05th of July 2008 03:24:52 AM

[color=red]I WISH YOU A VERY HAPPY 4th OF JULY![/color]


Dominick_Korshanyenko
Saturday 05th of July 2008 03:42:09 AM
Thanks Lina! The celebrations on the 4th of July are always amazing. Tonight we're having a barbecue and setting off fireworks! I can't wait! Does Romania have an Independence Day? And from whom?


Lina
Saturday 05th of July 2008 04:03:54 AM

It's great! Have a nice day:)/Este grozav! S? ai o zi frumoas?!

Our National Day is in the first of December when we celebrate the unification of all Romanian regions in one country!




daniela
Sunday 06th of July 2008 10:55:43 PM
Originally posted by Lina
It's great! Have a nice day:)/Este grozav! S? ai o zi frumoas?!

Our National Day is in the first of December when we celebrate the unification of all Romanian regions in one country!




Here is something about our national day.


The National Assembly in Alba Iulia (December 1, 1918)

Union of Transylvania with Romania was declared on December 1 [O.S. November 18] 1918.

The national holiday of Romania, the Union Day (also called Unification Day[1]) occurring on December 1, commemorates the assembly of the delegates of ethnic Romanians held in Alba Iulia, which declared the Union of Transylvania with Romania. This holiday, set after the 1989 Romanian Revolution, marks the unification not only of Transylvania, but also of the provinces of Banat, Bessarabia and Bukovina with the Romanian Kingdom, in 1918, the Union of Transylvania with Romania being the last event, sealing the unification of the country.




Dominick_Korshanyenko
Tuesday 08th of July 2008 11:04:18 AM
That sounds great. I don't think America could even have a unification day. There is no such thing as an ethnic American (except for Native Americans but thats another story). I think America should celebrate the unification of the North and the South after the Civil War, though. Sometimes I don't even feel like the United States is united but then again. In times of trouble or economic stress everyone realizes the importance of unification. With the upcoming election coming up in America I beginning to get worried. We need a strong leader and we won't get one for at least another four years. :) I look forward to December first. December was already my favorite month but now it has even more that is special about it.


daniela
Thursday 17th of July 2008 02:59:44 AM
I think 1st December is the most important Romanian official day.


How nice you share with us

Which one is the most important to the Americans?


Dominick_Korshanyenko
Thursday 17th of July 2008 11:47:22 PM
Hmm, probably the 4th of July. :ha On the 4th of July 1776 we declared independence from Britain and if we hadn't or if we had lost the war we would still be English territory. :p


daniela
Thursday 31st of July 2008 10:48:25 PM
Romanians are said to be one of the most welcoming and friendliest people in the world. When you first meet them, you may find them formal by Western standards. This may take the form of old-fashioned behaviour such as a man kissing a woman's hand when they meet. Men usually greet each other with a hand shake and it is not unusual for friends, both men and women, to kiss on both cheeks. In rural areas, it is usual to greet people individually and even to greet strangers! Traditionally, first names are used only by friends and relatives and by adults when they are addressing children.




Do you agree?




Lina
Sunday 08th of March 2009 09:15:49 PM
Originally posted by Lina
1 Martie - Ziua Mar?i?orului

Today is a special day for us! We celebrate the arrival of spring in an unique way!

In the old Roman calendar, the 1st of March was the first day of the year and festivities called Matronalia were being held in the honor of Mars, the god of nature, spring and agriculture.

Many archeological findings from Romania revealed Mar?isoare as old as 8000 years. Small river stones painted in white and red. The red color of fire, blood and sun, was linked with life, therefore woman. The white was the color of the waters and clouds and associated to man's wisdom.

Iat? legenda m?r?i?orului...Odat? soarele coborî într-un sat, la hor?, luând chipul unui fecior. Un zmeu l-a pândit ?i l-a r?pit dintre oameni, închizându-l într-o temni??. Lumea se întristase. P?s?rile nu mai cântau, izvoarele nu mai curgeau, iar copiii nu mai râdeau. Nimeni nu îndr?znea s?-l înfrunte pe zmeu. Dar într-o zi, un tânar voinic s-a hotarât s? plece s? salveze soarele. Mul?i dintre p?mânteni l-au condus ?i i-au dat din puterile lor ca s?-l ajute s?-l biruie pe zmeu ?i s? elibereze soarele. Drumul lui a durat 3 anotimpuri: vara, toamna ?i iarna. A g?sit castelul zmeului ?i au început lupta. S-au înfruntat zile întregi pâna când zmeul a fost doborât. Sl?bit de puteri ?i r?nit, tânarul elibera Soarele. Acesta se ridica pe cer înveselind ?i bucurând lumea. A reînviat natura, oamenii s-au bucurat, dar viteazul n-a ajuns s? vad? primavara. Sângele cald din r?ni i s-a scurs în zapada. Pe când acesta se topea, r?s?reau flori albe, ghioceii, vestitorii prim?verii. Pâna ?i ultima pic?tura de sânge se scurse în z?pada imaculata. Muri. De atunci tinerii împletesc doi ciucura?i: unul alb ?i unul ro?u. Ei le ofera fetelor pe care le iubesc sau celor apropia?i. Ro?ul înseamn? dragoste pentru tot ce este frumos, amintind de culoarea sângelui voinicului. Albul simbolizeaza s?n?tatea ?i puritatea ghiocelului, prima floare a primaverii...



Aceste mar?isoare sunt lucrate manual din os, m?rgele sau ceramic?!
These \"m?r?i?oare\" are hand made from ceramics, bead and bone.











Va amintiti acum de Martisoare?:)


mike111
Wednesday 11th of March 2009 05:15:42 AM
Lina, for some reason, I don't see the images you posted. Anyone else have this problem?


Dominick_Korshanyenko
Wednesday 11th of March 2009 04:47:00 PM
Originally posted by danielaRomanians are said to be one of the most welcoming and friendliest people in the world. When you first meet them, you may find them formal by Western standards. This may take the form of old-fashioned behaviour such as a man kissing a woman's hand when they meet. Men usually greet each other with a hand shake and it is not unusual for friends, both men and women, to kiss on both cheeks. In rural areas, it is usual to greet people individually and even to greet strangers! Traditionally, first names are used only by friends and relatives and by adults when they are addressing children.


Do you agree?



This is one thing I like about foreign countries. Americans are uptight turtles hiding in their shells.

The pictures aren't working. It means that the links are bad.


mike111
Thursday 30th of April 2009 07:30:03 PM
Prietene,

Ai sa un intai mai frumos! :)

Have a nice labour day!


Dominick_Korshanyenko
Friday 01st of May 2009 05:15:36 PM
Bah, humbug. ;)


mike111
Monday 25th of May 2009 06:01:40 PM
happy memorial day: Happy Memorial Day to all of our American friends on phrasebase!

I wish all of us a safe and fun day out of work and school. :-D


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