Spanish Dialects World-wide Differences In The Spanish Language

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gvdan08
Wednesday 04th of May 2005 12:18:10 PM
Dialects: Give some examples of regional, continental, country-to-country differences in the Spanish language.

try to note some peculiarities in different countries: Chile, Argentina, Colombia, Mexico, etc.


jvz8a
Wednesday 04th of May 2005 12:25:47 PM
Fortunately these differences do not affect seriously the communication among Spanish speakers. But sometimes you can get some surprises:
In El Salvador, prestar means to borrow: "Le presté dinero a mi primo". If you say that in Mexico, everybody would understand that you lend him money.


JMPH
Friday 06th of May 2005 10:45:02 AM
I don't know a lot of spanish. But, one think I learned is that, "andar" which means "to walk". Can in Mexico or possibly other places be used in a sense of friendship or romance. Someone would say, "¿Quieres andar conmigo? Meaning, do you want to be my friend or girlfriend or boyfriend etc.


gvdan08
Friday 06th of May 2005 01:59:17 PM
yeah, i think you're right.


fiamma_gt
Tuesday 31st of May 2005 08:44:13 AM

The word "papaya" is a fruit's name in many countries, included my own, Guatemala. But in Dominican Republic, for example, it means prostitute.


Osman
Saturday 08th of July 2006 05:27:09 PM
hmm.. Thanks to Goran i noticed here :)

as far as i know..

in Latin America (at least in Argentina),

they read yo different than Spanish people. They read y of yo as in s of pleasure.

and whilst they say Méjico, Spanish speakers use México, But to my surprise, prononciation is same :)

what else..hmm...

vale which means ok is not used in central and latin america

please share more if you know :)


pableras28
Sunday 09th of July 2006 09:56:17 PM
In Spain, "coger" means to "pick something", but in some countries of Latin America means "to make love with someone", but I think it has some informal connotations. :D

In some Latin American countries, they say "auto" or "carro" for "car", while in Spain we say "coche".

"Concha" means shell in Spain, but in Latin America, it means the sexual parts of a female. It's a vulgar word in Latin America.

As you see, the majority of the differences are lexical, the grammar remains the same (or almost the same, in case there was any difference I ignore :p).


jvz8a
Sunday 09th of July 2006 10:06:04 PM
Originally posted by pableras28
In Spain, "coger" means to "pick something", but in some countries of Latin America means "to make love with someone", but I think it has some informal connotations.No. We use it also as "to pick something". For what you mean, it'd be a double sense... more in the meaning of to fuck (the sexual meaning).
In some Latin American countries, they say "auto" or "carro" for "car", while in Spain we say "coche".I'd say coche is the most popular in Latin America.
"Concha" means shell in Spain, but in Latin America, it means the sexual parts of a female. It's a vulgar word in Latin America.Not true. In Mexico, there is a kind of pastry that is called that way. And of course, for us concha is a shell. The name of the pastry is beacuase it resembles a shell. It is also a short name for women whose name is Concepción. I think it is the same in Spain.

The words you mention, Pablo, are used only in that double sense that is present also in English (which I am NOT going to mention). Those are NOT vulgar words. They can be used as such, yes, but I think all languages can do the same with perfectly innocent words.
[unless you try to convince me that pajarito is a word for a little bird in Spain and some other thing for us perverts in Latin America]


maximus852
Sunday 09th of July 2006 11:17:21 PM
My mother is from El Salvador, and she has a tendency to say "doblar" when she means to say "crusar" or "segir recto." She knows it's incorrect and often catches herself doing it. She says she got the habit from her mother, but now I'm wondering if that is common in Central America or just a familiar trait?

As an aside;

Originally posted by jvz8a



In El Salvador, prestar means to borrow: "Le presté dinero a mi primo". If you say that in Mexico, everybody would understand that you lend him money.

My mother also does this, but my father is American and learned grammatically correct Spanish in a classroom setting, so whenever she says that, my dad gets irritated! Although, since I grew up hearing Spanish primarily from my mother, it sounds correct to my ear.

[color=blue]-cruzar
-seguir recto[/color]


pableras28
Monday 10th of July 2006 03:57:49 AM
That's only what I've heard. However, I did not say those were the only meanings of the words. And by the way...what does pajarito mean? :D


jvz8a
Monday 10th of July 2006 04:00:44 AM
shhhh!!! little kids come in this pages too! :D
lol let's keep it to the real differences.


leobloom
Monday 10th of July 2006 04:26:39 AM
pajarito es chick, no? Como en inglés, las chicas muy guapas son las chick, no? =o)


jvz8a
Monday 10th of July 2006 09:06:45 PM
lol no :D forget my comment, Vito, please :D It was only to make a point.


leobloom
Wednesday 12th of July 2006 06:07:44 AM
ah, ok Jaci :D I hadn't get it, God, I need some holidays! Btw, talking about accents in Spanish, is it only me or Argentinians tend to skip the [z] and [s] sounds by pronouncing them as an h I've been watching some Argie tv online lately and Iìve noticed their way of pronounciation =o)


jvz8a
Wednesday 12th of July 2006 06:58:00 AM
There was a coment about that [url=http://www.phrasebase.com/discuss/read.php?TID=11060]here. Is that what you are talking about?


leobloom
Wednesday 12th of July 2006 07:20:16 PM
yep, exactly :D I hadn't seen that threead for a long time! It was nice to have differences among the Spanish variaties.

bt, I've found a great podcast about Argentinian Spanish, to me sounds so cool =o)

http://desdeelbano.blogspot.com/


jvz8a
Wednesday 12th of July 2006 10:11:39 PM
I prefer the way Chileans speak. A different way from Argentinians.

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