Tagalog A Couple Of Questions?

Phrasebase Archive

Return to the TAGALOG Archive
Forward to the Current TAGALOG Discussion


Sk8More
Sunday 22nd of January 2006 04:35:08 AM
A couple of questions?: The interrogatives are considered like adjectives/modifiers right? I've noticed that they can take a ligature attachment.


NG and ANg used together in a sentence must NG come before ANg in order not to confuse the sentence. Or does one understand either way.

Example:
lumusob ang ibon ng lalaki.

Won't persons get confused on if the bird is attaking or the bird of the man.




Dawnlorraine
Monday 23rd of January 2006 07:30:46 AM
Sk8more, ang is an article. Ng as used in the sentence in your example is another article. Let's take a look at your example:

Example:
lumusob ang ibon ng lalaki.

If translated to English, your example should mean:

The bird of the man attacked.

If your verb conjugation uses um as you did in this example, sa should be used after ang instead of ng.

Instead of lumusob ang ibon ng lalaki., You can say: Lumusob ang ibon sa lalaki - The bird attacked the man.

Or if you want to say it in passive form, ng comes before ang..it goes this way:

The bird attacked the man. The tagalog verb conjugation should use 'ni', as shown below:

Nilusob ng ibon ang lalaki.

ng comes before ang if the sentence is in passive form. If your sentence is in the active form, ang should come before ng.

Example:

Ang lalaki ay nilusob ng ibon.
The man was attacked by the bird








Sk8More
Wednesday 25th of January 2006 12:50:32 AM
Alright thanks that clearified the second question.

A couple more if you don't mind??

I have a book. The book suggest that the use of pareho be used to show equal comparison. It doesn't specify how but gives a rather breif example. Whats the correct way to use pareho?

There is a form of Magkakasing for three subject comparisons. Is there one for Kasing?

Can? Magkasing and Kasing can both be shortened to Sing?



Dawnlorraine
Wednesday 25th of January 2006 06:33:07 AM
No, no... I don't mind at all.

I agree. Pareho shows equal comparison. It means 'both', and sometimes 'the same'in English. So needless to say, it's an adjective in the comparative degree. It also has its plural form, pare-parehowhich is used in comparing more than two people, places, events or objects. In terms of application, it's mostly used like the way you use 'both' and 'the same'in English.

Here are some examples:

A. Using pareho as 'the same':

1. Nakatanggap sila ng parehong regalo nitong Pasko. - They received the same gift this Christmas.

2. Nagbigay sila ng parehong pahayag tungkol sa sakuna. . - They gave the same oipinion about the accident.


B. Using pareho as 'both':

1. Iniwan nila pareho ang kaklase nilang maingay. - They both left their noisy classmate.

2. Parehong nalungkot ang kambal sa pasiya ng kanilang ama na mangibang-bayan. The twins were both saddened by their father's decision to go abroad.



or you can even say: (only that it sounds redundant)

Pareho silang nakatanggap ng parehong regalo nitong Pasko. - They both received the same gift this Christmas




Dawnlorraine
Wednesday 25th of January 2006 06:52:40 AM
Oh by the way, yes, you can shorten magkasing and kasing to sing if it is followed by an adjective word that is starting with a vowel or any of the following letters: g, h, k, l, m, n, p, r, s, w, and y. Use sin if the adjective starts with letter d or t.

Examples:

sing:

singkapal - as thick as
sing-ingay - as noisy as

sin

sintaba - as fat as
sindami - as many as

You can also use either sing or sim for adjectives starting with letter b or p.

Examples:

singbabà/simbabà - as low as
singpangit/simpangit - as ugly as





Sk8More
Wednesday 25th of January 2006 09:41:34 PM
Ok cool. The more I look at my notes I seem to develop more questions.

1_I've notice that the word "medyo" doesn't seeem to need a ligature. Ture?

2_Also the number 100 is it Saandan or is it isang daan? I'm thinking the first might be contraction of the second. Still on the same question when the number grows past 100 does the last "n" of saandan drop off before the addition of "at('t")"?

3_Reduplication of any color producecs and immediate prefix of "DarK + (the color) right? Or are there exceptions also.

4_Is their a requirement of an "AT" for every thing being linked in a sentence as in English like:
daga at aso ,at ibon
or is it
daga, aso, at ibon

5_There are some one where the letter "R" morphs to a "D"
(Marumi;madumi
karanasan;kadanasan)
what are the requirements for this to happen?

6_Is there a morph with "p" and "k" also?
napapagod->nakakagod




Dawnlorraine
Thursday 26th of January 2006 06:52:45 AM
Okay here are my answers:

1. Yes, the word medyo has no affixes.

2. Right again. sandaan is the contraction of the words isang daan (100), so if you say either isang daan or sandaan, they are both correct.

If the number grows past 100, let's say 101, you can only use sandaa't if the next word is the last word of the number :

sandaa't isa, until you reach 120 (sandaa't dalawampu). 121 should besandaan dalawampu't isa; 140 - sandaa't apatnapu; 141 - sandaan apatnapu't isa; 150 -sandaa't limampu; 151 - sandaan limampu't isa

3. I don't quite get what you say in number 3. Do you mean to say this?:

mamula-mula - reddish (from the root word pula (red)
manilaw-nilaw - yellowish (root word dilaw (yellow)

4. The usage of at (and) is very just like the way you use and in English. So it should be daga, aso at ibon (rat, dog and bird)

5. Marumi (dirty), marami (many), karanasan (experience), maramot (selfish) are all prefixed except for karanasan, which is both prefixed and suffixed words whose root words start with letter d:

marumi - dirty, from the word dumi - dirt
marami - many, from the root word dami - quantity
karanasan - experience, root word danas - to experience(noun)
maramot - selfish, root word damot - to be selfish

Most root words starting with letter d change in form when affixed, and d is replaced with r. Since the root words start with letter d, some people still say madumi instead of marumi, madamot instead of maramot, madami intead of marami. In all these, the correct way to say words starting with letter d when affixed should be the one with r instead of d (so marumi, marami, maramot, karanasan are the correct words)

6. nakakapagod cannot be changed to nakakagod. Otherwise it doesn't mean tiresome anymore. Rather, the meaning changes to being grated (nakakagod), and it's not even a tagalog word anymore, but an erroneoulsy affixed Cebuano word.



Sk8More
Thursday 26th of January 2006 07:37:21 PM
Ok Thanks Miss Dawn.

3_I wanted to know if you reduplicate a color. Does it automatically get a prefix of "Dark" for any color that is reduplicated. Or are their exceptions?

berdeng-berde Dark Green
pulang-pula Dark Red

4_ Is it like Spanish also where the last "AT" doesn't need a comma?

5_ You may have missed me, I meant to ask when do the "R"s change to "D"s . Like in the words

Marumi > Marumi
Kadanasan> Karanasan

Alright, and Thanks thats all I should have for a while.


Dawnlorraine
Friday 27th of January 2006 06:12:44 AM
Okay, I got you now

3_I wanted to know if you reduplicate a color. Does it automatically get a prefix of "Dark" for any color that is reduplicated. Or are their exceptions?

For color words that end with a vowel like berde, pula, you are right. Just add ng to the first word before duplicating, as what you've done in your examples berdeng berde, pulang pula. But if the color word ends with a consonant, you have to use na.

Here are some examples:

dilaw na dilaw - dark yellow
asul na asul - dark blue

4. Yes, Sk8more, you don't need a comma before the word at

5. Grammatically, "R"s should not change to "D". You cannot find any Filipino Grammar book that uses "D" instead of "R". Using "D" mostly happens in informal writing and daily Tagalog conversations.





Sk8More
Wednesday 01st of February 2006 07:36:29 PM
thanks for answering that all I have for now.


Dawnlorraine
Thursday 02nd of February 2006 08:47:16 AM
No problem, Sk8more. Come back anytime you have questions. I'm sure there will always be someone who will be glad to help you.


Qcumber
Friday 28th of April 2006 05:09:42 AM
um-V ang A sa B > V-in ng A ang B: Dawn Lorraine wrote:"Instead of lumusob ang ibon ng lalaki., You can say: Lumusob ang ibon sa lalaki - The bird attacked the man. [...] Nilusob ng ibon ang lalaki."

Generally verbs whose indirect complement is introduced by _sa_ have their form focused on the complement in _-an_
e.g. The man helped the woman
Tumúlong ang mamâ sa babáe. > Tinulúngan ng mamâ ang babáe.

In your example, the verbal form focused on the indirect object introduced by _sa_ in an -in form.
Do you know other verbs where we have mag-V / um-V ang A sa B > V-in ng A ang B?





Sk8More
Friday 28th of April 2006 05:57:41 AM
Barely am able to comprehend. If you could lower the usage of the involute linguistical terminology.

Particularly, why do you have the comparison keys inserted in this:

"In your example, the verbal form focused on the indirect object introduced by _sa_ in an -in form.
Do you know other verbs where we have mag-V / um-V ang A sa B > V-in ng A ang B?"
If this is directed to me; what does this 'A' and 'B' stand for? Thx.






Qcumber
Friday 05th of May 2006 07:10:59 PM
verbs like lúsob: A and B in the formula mean anything you want.
OK, I'll try to put my question in very simple terms.

If your verb conjugation uses um as you did in this example, sa should be used after ang instead of ng.

Dawn Lorraine wrote: "Instead of lumusob ang ibon ng lalaki., You can say: Lumusob ang ibon sa lalaki - The bird attacked the man."

Could you please give other verbs whose construction is the same as that of _lúsob_?

Lumúsob ang íbon sa laláki. > Nilúsob nang íbon ang laláki. "The bird attacked the man."

P.S. By "you" I mean any forum member, Sk8More, but Dawn Lorraine in particular since she is the one who suggested this construction.



Sk8More
Friday 05th of May 2006 08:00:53 PM
I think it probrably deals with actions that are transitive and connote the feeling of transfer this action "to" something, similar to Spanish, although in Spanish it tends to have limited usage so it might be limited in Tagalog too. I would actually like to get a confirmation of this so help us out if you know.


Qcumber
Saturday 06th of May 2006 03:05:36 AM
um-V ang A sa B > V-in nang A ang B: Sk8more, I'm puzzled by this problem. I hope Dawn Lorraine will provide some other verbs of this category to draw out some conclusion ... if possible.


Sk8More
Saturday 06th of May 2006 09:49:26 PM
You could IM Dawn.
You could also try emailing a professor at the seasite.niu site?


Dawnlorraine
Wednesday 24th of May 2006 06:24:00 AM
Okay, sorry this is the first time I read this. Sk8, I still maintain the first translation I made.

The sentence was in an active form:

The bird attacked the man.

So I also translated it into an active voice:

Lumusob ang ibon sa lalaki.

If the sentence was in a passive form:

The man was attacked by the bird.

the translation should be:

Nilusob ng ibon ang lalaki.

Quite honestly, I don't understand what Qcumber is trying to say. What I noticed though is his erroneous usage of the Tagalog stresses. The words 'lumusob' or 'nilusob' definitely do not need any stress at all because they are in the 'malumay' form.

Let me further point this out:

Originally quoted by Qcumber:

Lumúsob ang íbon sa laláki. > Nilúsob nang íbon ang laláki. "The bird attacked the man."

Nang in the sentence as used by Qcumber should have been spelled 'ng' (which means 'by' in the passive voice and 'sa' in the active voice). Nang is an adverb of time (which means 'when').

Okay going back to the translation of the sentence: The bird attacked the man, I am hoping that Sk8 and the rest of the Tagalog learners are not anymore confused.





Sk8More
Thursday 25th of May 2006 01:18:49 AM
No prob, Miss Dawn Thanx. This was a question asked by Qcumber (whom probrably already left) although I think you answered it with this:

Nang in the sentence as used by Qcumber should have been spelled 'ng' (which means 'by' in the passive voice and 'sa' in the active voice).

My questions which were deleted, I asked on the Seasite MB and some guy sorta answered some at http://www.seasite.niu.edu/discgroup/
Thanx.


Sk8More
Monday 05th of June 2006 10:26:17 PM
Here's that post that got deleted here, but was answered on Seasite.

[font size=8]
1)With a multiple modifiers to a word does each modifier take a respective ligature?
Ex: May malinaw na malamig na purong tubig ako.
I have clear,cold,pure water.
Could one just say:
May malinaw,malamig,at purong tubig ako.

2)What if I add a second noun with the word “ng”, then it takes no ligature, correct? As in:
May malinaw na malamig na purong bote ng tubig ako.

-
3)Since all subject's are unfocused within a recently completed action, Will it be understood that there's a distinction between the object and the doer in a intransitive sentence. Such as the sentences.
Kapagbabasa lang ng kape sa pupitre.
Kapagbabasa lang ng papel.

Which one is correct?
In sentence no.1 is it able to be understood that “the coffee just wet the desk/”?
And in sentence no.2 that “the paper just got wet in the second.”?

4)A negative sentence of recently completed action with a prononun is as so?
Hindi nita kapagbibili lang ng disco.

5)Is there a definitive way to know which rootwords can take which affixes.

6)Are idioms and phrases injected into a sentence, as so?
Siya ay maitim ang budhi.
Maitim ang budhi si Kaleisha.

7)What about an existensial?
May maitim ang budhi siya OR May siyang maitim ang budhi.

8)How would you use one to a certain tense? I've actually seen the Mag- affix attached to one. Such as:
Nagtatawang-aso siya sa iyo. He's sneering at you.

If so would this also be correct....

Magmamainit ang ulo siya kung mapapansin niya ang kanyang ex-nobya kasamang lalaki(ng) diyan. (May need correction)
He will be angry if he notices his ex with that guy there.
-
9) Is there a difference detonation-wise,connotation-wise, or otherwise between kapit and hawak.

Thanx in Advance!

P.S. Do you know any other fun idioms,that, I may be able to use in English. I especially love to say “Sure, I'll buy that...when ravens turn white” or “He's so rich he s**ts cash.” I even used the first one in Spanish.
[/font]
Reply
Carlo 5/22/2006 1:06:40 PM RE: Long List of Questions Here's my attempt to answer what I can:

1) Your second sentence is more correct than the first. To say "malinaw na malamig na purong tubig" is awkward, because "malinaw" seems to describe "malamig" with the "na" between them.

Though your second sentence appears grammatically correct, it sounds better to say "Mayroon akong malinaw, malamig at purong tubig."

2) Like my answer in the first question, it sounds better to say, "Mayroon akong bote na may malinaw, malamig at purong tubig."

(I'm not a teacher of Filipino, by the way, so I can't accurately suggest the proper rules. I just speak the language and write it from experience.)

3) I know the answer, but I can't clearly explain why.

4) Please give your sentence in English first, thanks. It's a bit unclear.

5) Not sure what the question means. Are you talking about verbs?

6) Yes. "Siya ay may maitim na budhi." "Maitim ang budhi ni Kaleisha."

7) "Mayroon siyang maitim na budhi."

8)For the second question, it's "mag-iinit" or "iinit" ("will become hot"). "Magmama-" suggests "will attempt to be". As in "magmamarunong" ("will attempt to be knowledgeable") or "magmamalinis" ("will attempt to be clean (of guilt)").

9) Basically, "kapit" is "to hold on to" wherein contact is already established. "Hawak" is simply "to hold" where there is still no contact. So if you're rescuing someone who's clinging to the side of a cliff, you first shout "Kapit!!" Then you reach out your hand with "Hawakan mo ang kamay ko!"

Other idioms:

Balat-sibuyas (onion-skinned) - emotionally sensitive. "Ang nanay ko."

Kainin mo ang...! (Eat your...!) - Very common retort to reject something offered or suggested. Commonly used in a humorous, bitchy manner.

Peter: "Maria, mahal kita!"
Maria: "Kainin mo ang pagmamahal mo!"

Sorry I couldn't help more. I hope I didn't add to your confusion. :-)

Sk8More 5/24/2006 1:38:16 PM RE: RE: Long List of Questions Nope, I really wasn't confused by anything you said., and Thanx that was very helpful to me understanding the grammar more.

Now to clear up the misunderstandings.

4)A negative sentence of recently completed action with a prononun is as so?

Hindi nita kapagbibili lang ng disco.
~~I didn't just by the dsic for you.~~

I mean to say if I use a negative recently completed action does the pronoun still go after 'hindi' typically.

5)Is there a definitive way to know which rootwords can take which affixes.

Yes, I mean verbs., and understanding which affixes like (UM,MAG,MAKI,PAG, etc..) can go to a rootword, because sometimes it seems like alot of places use ones that aren't listed in my dictionary.

8) I'm slightly confused on this one. I was trying to ask how one would use an idiom in a certain aspect/tense.

So this is correct ,right?
Nagtatawang-aso siya sa iyo. He's sneering at you.

If so would this also be correct....

Magmamainit ang ulo siya kung mapapansin niya ang kanyang ex-nobya kasamang lalaki(ng) diyan. (May need correction)

He will be angry if he notices his ex with that guy there.

The idiom like "mainit ang ulo" I think means to be mad or upset. So I was wondering if it was alright to say "he will be mad" by treating the idiom as a regular rootword/verb:

MAG/MA/mainit ang ulo.

Although, I sorta now understand what you are saying,that maybe I have to get rid of the adjective maker MA- before adding the MAG prefix. Although, if you are suggesting that then that contrasts with what I have seen before with another idiom "Mahabang dulang" or to that effect with the affix MAG-

Magmamahabang dulang siya.
~~She is getting married.

Thanx
-
Hmmm... If there are other experienced Filipino speakers and writers in the house, please feel free to add or correct me. I am a Filipino and I write and speak Filipino, so I may have the "native speaker's curse."

What I can answer for now...

4) Generally, yes, but the pronoun is that of the doer of the action.

"Hindi ko kabibili lang 'yung disc para sa 'yo."

Though the above sentence is more or less gramatically correct, it is a bit unwieldy. Normally, when someone asks, "Kabibili mo lang ba 'yung disc para sa akin?" the normal answer would be "Hindi, kanina pa." ("No, [I bought it] a while ago.")

Additional:

Kabibili ko lang ng disc para sa iyo. "I just bought a disc for you." ...This sounds correct.

To say "the disc" instead of "a disc", we would have to change "ng" to "ang", HOWEVER the resulting sentence ("Kabibili ko lang ang disc...") would sound awkward. We would say "Kabibili ko lang 'yung disc para sa iyo" wherein "'yung" makes a direct referral to the existing disc that was just bought. "'Yun" comes from "ayun" or "iyon."

Also, "kapagbibili" as a word is incorrect. But as two words "kapag bibili" is correct, meaning "if (pronoun) will buy"

5) UM - usually used with verbs starting with vowels

MAG - generally used as a prefix of command with the root verb unchanged. As in "Maglinis ka ng kuwarto." ("Clean the room.") as opposed to "Maglilinis ka ng kuwarto." ("You will clean the room.")

MAKIKI - generally to suggest an exchange or of giving favor, or joining someone in the same action. "Makikikanta" ("will sing along with"); I don't recall MAKI as a prefix in itself.

PAG - generally to transform a verb into a noun. As in "Sumabog ang tenga ni Pedro dahil sa pagkanta ni Maria." ("Pedro's ears exploded because of Maria's singing."

8) You have a good point on this one. I 'm trying to think of a rationale, though this MIGHT be one of those "mouse-mice, house-houses" cases...

Sk8More 5/26/2006 9:59:34 AM RE: RE: RE: RE: Long List of Questions A! Maraming Salamat.

4) Thanx. I understand now. Although, that raises one more simple question. I actually had the wrong conjugation of "Kapag" ,but you now say that 'Kapagbibili' isn't a word. So how would one say 'I just sold'.

Bumili to buy Kabibili
Mag-bili to sell ??????

5) By this question I actually meant how am I suppose to know that this verb only takes this affix , but not that affix?

8) Yeah, probrably just one of those exceptions
To sell is "benta"

I just sold - kabebenta ko lang

5) It's tricky...I had that problem when I was growing up since I was reared mostly on American children's shows. I had to allow the proper use of affixes to assimilate. I wish I could give you concrete rules here, but I don't want to give wrong advice. Maybe the other experts here can give good answers.

Robert 5/30/2006 4:23:47 PM RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Long List of Questions 5) That is truly one of the hardest parts of learning Tagalog. While you are still learning, you can conjugate everything with 'mag-', and natives will correct you, so you'll learn which verbs take which conjugations. However, here are some basic rules. Remember that for every rule there is an exception (or lots).

Mag- is usually used for verbs where the action drastically modifies the noun.
Um- is usually used for verbs that have internal action.
Remember that i- is the object-focus counterpart to mag-, and in- is the object-focus counterpart to um.



Sk8More
Monday 05th of June 2006 10:28:18 PM
What are the slang/informal/colloquial words for ito.iyan,iyon. All I know are:

to ,yan, yon, yun,
dyan,dyon

Are there anymore?

Also is this the typical Teen Tagalog way of typing:

From praning.com

guys.. ganto xe un,...mei gf me..kso ang arte arte nia in all ways..alm nmn nia ung mga ayaw at gs2 ko. ayw na ayaw ko tlg ng maarteng tao. alm nia lht un. kso ung iba gngwa pa dn nia. gya n lng pg dating sa pananamit, ayw ko ng sexy na damit kso minsan sinusuway nia. pasaway tlg e! pti sa pag gamit ng make ups! sb ko ayw ko sa gf ung maxadong may make-up sa muka, pro minsan gngwa pa dn nia. nkkaswa na dn kc minsan. pa uulit ulit n lng. tska, feeling ko di nia ko kayang i-prioritize... hayy! wat can i do ba..

How can I be effective at this? Seems like all I need to do is delete some vowels.


Dawnlorraine
Tuesday 06th of June 2006 03:16:57 PM
Hi Sk8! A bit colloquial, and yes informal and sometimes a bit of contraction.

For:

'ito' (this) - 'to, ire
'ganito' (like this) - ganto, ganire
'diyan' (there) - dyan, dyaan
'doon' (there) - dun
'dito' (here) - dine, todits

and yes, a lot more.

Typing like the one from praning.com is not really encouraged. The reason why most people here do that in text messaging is to save space.

It should have been written this way:

Guys, ganito kasi 'yon. May girlfriend ako, kaso and arte-arte niya in all ways. Alam naman niya 'yung mga ayaw at gusto ko. Ayaw na ayaw ko talaga ng maarteng tao. Alam niya lahat 'yun. Kaso 'yung iba ginagawa pa din (should have been 'rin'). Gaya nalang pagdating sa pananamit, ayaw ko ng sexy na damit kaso minsan ginagawa pa din (rin) niya. Pasawaytalaga eh!. Pati sa paggamit ng make ups! Sabi ko ayaw ko sa gf yung masyadong may make up sa mukha, pero minsan ginagawa pa din (rin) niya. Nakakasawa na din (rin) kasi minsan. Paulit-ulit nalang. At saka, feeling ko hindi niya ako kayang i-prioritize... hay! What can I do ba (Anong bang magagawa ko?)








Sk8More
Thursday 08th of June 2006 10:16:25 PM
Okee-dokey, Thanx.
I must say that is way easier to read, although if I post on praning I don't wanna seem square and like a lamer.

Is that a common mistake of not changing thd 'd' to 'r' after vowels?


Dawnlorraine
Friday 09th of June 2006 06:01:53 AM
Are you referring to the colloquials?


Sk8More
Friday 09th of June 2006 10:51:32 PM
No, just in general. Is it common to forget to change it.
Is it frowned upon also?


Dawnlorraine
Saturday 10th of June 2006 08:38:35 AM
I'd say yes.People tend to destroy the language even before they learn it.


Sk8More
Sunday 11th of June 2006 12:44:04 AM
Haha! What'd you mean by that?

Why and When does "kong" of something like "Gusto kong lumayag" chang e to "kung"?




Dawnlorraine
Tuesday 13th of June 2006 06:58:33 AM
Okay. What do I mean by that? Simple. Some people tend to misuse the language by making funny shortcuts and all, even at a time when they have not yet fully understood the language. Example: Alis na me (should have been 'Aalis na ako')- I have to go. or Asan na u? (Nassan ka na?) - Where are you?

Kung could mean either when or if

Kung as an adverb of time, means when.

Example: Kung - when:

Kung wala ang pusa, naglalaro ang daga.
When the cat is away, the rat plays.

Kung can also be used as a conjuction 'if'.

Example:
Kung - if:

Uuwi akong maaga kung magluluto ka ng hapunan.
I will go home early if you cook dinner.

Kong, on the other hand is a contraction of the possessive pronoun ko (my, me) and the conjuction na (that/who [is]).

Example:

Ang kamag-aral kong matalino ay pumasa sa pasulit.
My intelligent (my classmate who is intelligent) classmate passed the examination
or:

Ang damit kong itim ay bigay sa akin ng nanay ko.
My blue dress (or my dress that is blue) was given to me by my mother.










Haru-kun
Wednesday 25th of October 2006 06:18:12 PM
about Sk8more's question 5...: i dunno if it was answered.. but... we had a lesson 'bout that, last year, while i was 2nd and 1st year highschool...

it's all about phonemes... hmm.. uhh how should i say this... in Filipino it is "Ponemang malayang nagpapalitan"... in english literally, it is "Phonemes that change freely".. hehe... well, it's importance is to make the sound smooth and the conversation fast..

Sk8more's examples are..
...re some one where the letter "R" morphs to a "D"
(Marumi;madumi
karanasan;kadanasan)... hmm...dun forget madiin -> mariin..

oh... not only "R" and "D"...

Babai -> babae
lalaki -> lalake..
...

this is just 1 of 5 in our lesson... others are "Asimilasyon", "Metatesis" (hardest to think of an example, hehe), "Pagkakaltas ng Ponema", and "Paglilipat-diin".. :) hihi


Return to the TAGALOG Archive
Forward to the Current TAGALOG Discussion

Archive