Welsh An Excellent Resource For Beginners Of Welsh A Well Explained Beginner's Course With Audio!

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Anonymous
Friday 24th of November 2006 05:07:38 PM
An excellent resource for beginners of Welsh: Cli Clic Cymraeg is the best free beginner's course I have found online. You can find it here: http://www.menai.ac.uk/clicclic/default.htm . It starts off with the very basic of the language and works up, explaining each word individually first and then shows you how to put them together to found sentences. But don't listen to me, see for yourself!

BBC Welsh: http://www.bbc.co.uk/wales/learnwelsh/ is also an excellent resource, but perhaps for those who have already a lil Welsh. It has interactive games, audio conversations and phrase lists.


Ivan16
Friday 12th of January 2007 03:41:09 AM
How many ppl do speak Welsh? I think more than Irish, right?


Anonymous
Friday 16th of February 2007 08:57:19 PM
Originally posted by Ivan16


How many ppl do speak Welsh? I think more than Irish, right?

Welsh probably has more fluent and native speakers than Irish for whatever reason (perhaps something to do with Welsh Nationlism) but as to the total number of speakers for both languages it's very hard to measure and sources like the census are very subjective.


krake
Sunday 18th of February 2007 03:41:58 AM
According to my book "Welsh - word by word": 500,000 people speak Welsh in Wales, furthermore people in South America (Patagonia), North America and Australia. Within Wales, it is more widespread in the northern part (75%).


Anonymous
Sunday 18th of February 2007 04:15:31 PM
Originally posted by krake


According to my book "Welsh - word by word": 500,000 people speak Welsh in Wales, furthermore people in South America (Patagonia), North America and Australia. Within Wales, it is more widespread in the northern part (75%).

Yes I know the statistics but it's just extremely important what they are based on, how they are complied and what they really mean.

According to census figures out of the Republic's 4.2 million residents, there are approximately 1.6 million who regard themselves as competent in Irish. Of these, 350,000 reported using Irish every day, 155,000 weekly, 585,000 less often, 460,000 never, and 30,000 didn't state how often. Of the 350,000 who were reported to use Irish every day, the majority are schoolchildren who use it during their classes in Irish. The number of people in the Gaeltacht region of Ireland who use the language as their daily mother tongue has been variously cited as 70,000 and 83,000. (http://www.cso.ie/newsevents/pr_prelcen_02vol11.htm)

In the case of Irish when you say "speak" what are you really asking? Fluent, native, passable, language usage, learning, the few words? It's very hard to measure the number of speakers of a language when it is a minority language in a country and is spoken also as a minority language in other areas around the world and even more difficult when the number of learners is greater than the number of speakers. There are around 70 million "Irish" people in all corners of the world today.

Now of there are 70,000 native speakers in the Republic, some in northern Ireland and some in other parts of the UK and world (Canada for example) the size of possible learners is ENORMOUS compared to the actually native everyday speakers. (1,000 times greater!!) Imagine if Irish had as many speakers as there are "Irish people" in the world it would no longer be a minority or even small language.

It is depressing that a 2,000 year language, which was the language of Ireland and the Irish people and had in and around 4 million monolingual Irish native speakers at the Act of Union (Ireland) 1801 when Irish was forcefully dragged into the UK now has but 70,000 native speakers and all in that group (above the school going age of 4 and 1/2 years) speaks English also.

I'd say an realistic figure for Irish speakers who do use the language and have a solid grasp of it is about 100,000.

*f***ing big sigh*

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